Elements of Sex Offender-Specific Treatment: Learning Objectives • Identify some of the components of sex offender-specific treatment • Identify the four domains of sex.

Report
Elements of Sex Offender-Specific
Treatment: Learning Objectives
• Identify some of the components of sex
offender-specific treatment
• Identify the four domains of sex offenderspecific treatment
• Identify several ethical issues in the treatment of
sex offenders
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
1
Two Facets of Sex Offender
Management: Addressing both
External and Internal Controls
External Controls:
• Probation/Parole
Supervision
• Polygraph
Testing
• Registration/
Notification
• Use of
Community
Networks
Internal Controls:
External
Controls
Internal
Controls
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
The Four Domains of
Treatment:
• Sexual Interests
• Distorted
Attitudes
• Interpersonal
Functioning
• Behavior
Management
Short Version: Section 3
2
Characteristics of Sex OffenderSpecific Treatment
•
•
•
•
Explicit, empirically-based model of change
Expected to reduce recidivism
Social learning theory-based
Targets factors closely linked to sex offending
(criminogenic needs)
• Cognitive-behavioral techniques
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
3
Treatment is Skills Oriented
• Skills to avoid sex offending
• Skills to engage in legitimate activities
• “Skills oriented treatment” includes:
• Defining the skill
• Identifying the usefulness of the skill
• Modeling the skill
• Practicing the skill
• Giving feedback
• Practicing the skill again
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
4
How Long Should Sex
Offender Treatment Last?
• Until recently, answers to this question were
based only opinion—there is now research that
addresses this question
• Different offenders require different lengths of
treatment
• Higher levels of denial, sexual deviancy, and
risk require longer, more intense treatment
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
5
Monitoring and Quality Control of
Treatment are a Must
• Monitoring of:
• Program activities
• Clients
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
6
Treatment of the Denying Sex
Offender
• Denial is common among sex offenders
• But, admitting is vital to treatment
• Sex offenders who do not admit at some point
can’t be treated
• Therefore, treatment of denial is usually
necessary to make a client ready for sex
offender treatment
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
7
The Four Domains of Treatment
•
•
•
•
Sexual Interests
Distorted Attitudes
Interpersonal Functioning
Behavior Management
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
8
Behavior Management—The
Fourth Domain of Treatment
Sex offending is, by definition, mismanagement
of behavior by the offender. Thus, the purpose
of intervening in this treatment domain is to
assist offenders to manage their behavior in
responsible and non-victimizing ways. We will
discuss two methods:
• Covert Sensitization
• Relapse Prevention
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
9
Goals of Covert Sensitization
• To reduce the attractiveness of sexual assault
by having the offender focus on the negative
social consequences he faces
• To have offenders explore all of the
consequences of their actions—in particular the
negative consequences which offenders so
often refuse to recognize
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
10
Relapse Prevention
• First used in the treatment of alcohol and other
drug abuse
• If behavior could be managed to avoid certain
situations, then relapse was less likely
• Applied now in the treatment of sex offenders
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
11
Rationale for Relapse Prevention
• Sex offenders who believe that treatment will
eliminate their risk for reoffense are more likely
to recidivate
• Offenders who understand that they are never
“cured,” recognize offense precursors, and
avoid high risk thoughts, feelings, and
behaviors are more likely to remain offense-free
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
12
Adjunctive Therapies
• Marital and family therapy
• Family education seminars and couples
groups
• Substance abuse treatment
• Educational/vocational supports
• Individual therapy (usually for other issues)
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
13
Ethical Practice Standards
• Balancing the safety of the community with the
offender’s privacy
• Informed consent
• Association for the Treatment of Sexual
Abusers (ATSA) is the major professional
organization that speaks to ethical practice
standards in this field
• ATSA has issued a “Code of Ethics” as well as
practice standards and guidelines
• www.atsa.com
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
14
A Major Ethical Issue: Informed
Consent
At a minimum, sex offenders entering treatment
should have spelled out to them—preferably in
writing:
• The purpose and nature of treatment
• Its expected duration
• Its anticipated benefits, costs, and risks
• Limitations of confidentiality
CSOM Training Curriculum: An Overview of Sex Offender Treatment for a Non-Clinical Audience
Short Version: Section 3
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