century We st V irgin 21st Century Assessment Examples of Practice Clinic Session 9:45 – 11:15 for L earning a ia D ep a rt m en t of E d.

Report
century
We
st V
irgin
21st Century Assessment
Examples of Practice
Clinic Session
9:45 – 11:15
for
L earning
a
ia D ep a rt m en t of E d u c
t i on
century
We
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irgin
for
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ia D ep a rt m en t of E d u c
Deputy Director, Institute of Education,
University of London
Dylan Wiliam on Assessment for Learning
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Formative/Classroom
Assessment for Learning
Defined
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A process used by teachers and students during
instruction that provides feedback to adjust
ongoing teaching and learning to improve
students’ achievement of intended
instructional outcomes.
CCSSO Definition of Formative/Classroom Assessment for Learning
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Needed Improvements to
Realize Gains
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• Increased commitment to high-quality
classroom assessments
• Increased descriptive feedback; reduced
evaluative feedback
• Increased student involvement in the
assessment process
Black and Wiliam, 1989
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What is the Student
Involvement Component?
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 Classroom Assessment For Learning acknowledges the
critical importance of the instructional decisions made
by students and their teachers working as a team.
 Continuous descriptive (rather than evaluative)
feedback is provided
 Assessment becomes part of the learning process by
keeping students posted on their progress and
confident enough to continue to strive.
 Students use evidence of their own progress to
understand what comes next for them and to set goals.
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What is the Student
Involvement Component?
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• Students collaborate with teachers in creating and using
assessments like those they will be held accountable for
later.
• Students become partners in the accumulation of growth
portfolios that reveal the changes in their own
achievement as it is happening.
• Students become partners in communicating about their
own learning success as they rely on concrete evidence
from their portfolios presented in student-led
conferences.
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Seven Strategies of
Assessment for Learning
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• Provide a Clear and Understandable Vision of the
Learning Target
• Use Examples and Models of Strong and Weak Work
• Offer Regular Descriptive Feedback
• Teach Students to Self-Assess and Set Goals
• Design Lessons to Focus on One Aspect of Quality at
a Time
• Teach Students Focused Revision
• Engage Students in Self-Reflection and Let Them
Keep Track of and Share Their Learning
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The Effects of Self-Assessment and
Student Learning
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A key premise is that for students to be able to
improve, they must have the capacity to
monitor the quality of their own work during
actual production. This in turn requires that
students:
• Know what high quality work looks like
• Be able to objectively compare their work to
the standard
• Have a store of tactics to make work better
based on their observations (Sadler, 1989)
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Student SELF-assessment is crucial for feedback to
be used effectively. Students are the ones who
must ultimately take action to bridge the gap
between where they are and where they are
heading.
The transition from feedback to self-monitoring
can occur only when the student comes to know
what constitutes quality.
--Sadler, 1989
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The process of engaging in selfassessment increases students’
COMMITMENT to achieving important
educational goals.
--Covington, 1992
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A Process in Support of
Learning
Support
Learning
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Verify
Learning
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“Teachers involve their students in classroom assessment,
record-keeping, and communication during learning. But,
when it’s time for students to be accountable for what they
have learned, the teacher takes the lead in conducting
assessments OF learning.”
-Richard J. Stiggins
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Examples of Practice
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Is It or Isn’t It Formative Classroom Assessment?
• 5 vignettes
– Read one at a time (outloud)
– Decide whether each represents formative
classroom assessment or not
– If yes, what are the attributes that make it so?
– If not, why not?
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Examples of Practice
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Is It or Isn’t It Formative Classroom Assessment?
• Record your group’s responses on the charts
• Report out
• Check responses against those in handout
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Examples of Practice
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Align
Assess
Achieve
Westerville City Schools
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Table Reflections
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• Big Ideas
• Ideas which speak to you personally
• Questions still unanswered/random thoughts
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The Big Ideas
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MAJOR
POINTS
LEARNED
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Validate My Thoughts
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THESE
IDEAS
SQUARED
WITH
MY OWN
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Questions I Still Have?
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THINGS
STILL GOING
ON IN MY
HEAD
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Lisa Youell
Superintendent’s Center
for
21st Century Schools
[email protected]
304-558-3199
We
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