Resident Educator Full Day Orientation for RE*s and Mentors

Report
Resident Educator
Full Day Orientation for RE’s
and Mentors
in Year 2 & 3
{
BCESC
Amanda Blanton & Jackie Miller
SOESC
Kim Adams & Kimberly Douglas
Orientation Agenda
Residency Yearly Outline
 “What do I need to know and do?”
 Who supports Whom?
 What will the Program Coordinator do for the RE and
Mentor?
 What will the Mentor do to support my RE?
Resources to Ensure a Successful “Journey to Excellence”


SMART GOALS
Data Tools
What is Residency?
Residency is a time to practice, refine and gain
a deeper understanding of the art and science of
teaching under the guidance of a certified mentor and
the support of a professional learning community.
Ohio Resident Educator Program
Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession (OSTP)
STANDARD 1:
STANDARD 2:
STANDARD 3:
STANDARD 4:
STUDENTS
CONTENT
ASSESSMENT
INSTRUCTION
STANDARD 5: LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
STANDARD 6: COLLABORATION AND
COMMUNICATION
STANDARD 7: PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY
AND GROWTH
The Focus of Teaching
and Learning
The Conditions of
Teaching and Learning
Teaching as a
Profession
Ohio Resident Educator Program
The Ohio Continuum for Teacher Development delineates
five levels of teacher development.
Level
Describes
Emerging
Pre-Licensure; the teacher education candidate
Developing
Residency; the teacher whose skills are developing
Proficient
The teacher who is applying knowledge and skills
independently
Accomplished
The teacher who is fully skilled and able to integrate
knowledge and experience - in instruction, curriculum and
professional development - into practice
Distinguished
A teacher leader, consistently innovative, contributing to the
professional learning community
Ohio Resident Educator Program
Years 1-3 Formative Assessment
Processes and Tools
Resident Educator Self-Assessment
Assessment of Student Learning
Instructional Planning
Observation (Informal/Formal)
Professional Goal Setting Process
End of Year Formative Progress Review (FPR)
RE – Year 2 Timeline
RE – Year 2 Timeline
Red Expectations:
• Assessment of Student Learning
• Instructional Practices Lesson Study
• Instructional Cycle(s)
RE will
reflect,
analyze
and upload
Yellow Expectations:
their
• Self Assessment (Pre)
evidence to
• Self Assessment (Post)
support
this work
Green Expectations:
in their end
• Observation (Formal and Informal)
of year FPR
(Formative
Blue Expectations:
Progress
• Goal Setting – Using Smart Goal Format
Review)on your FPR
• Mid-Year Goal Review – Refer to this check in when reflecting
• End of Year Goal Review
RE – Year 2 FPR
Important Roles in the FPR Process
Resident Educator:
Submits detailed written responses to Prompts 1, 2, 3
and 4
Mentor:
Develops Questions for the RE that engage the RE into
deeper analysis of the FPR prompts and guides the
collaborative conversation following FPR completion.
Program Coordinator:
Oversees the FPR process to insure that it is completed
and enters completion data in CORE
RE – Purposes of Year 2 FPR
• Synthesize evidence of
practice
• Reflect on communication
and professional growth
in year 2.
• Engage in tasks that
stimulate the Resident
Educator Summative
Assessment (RESA)
Preparation for the
RESA is Key
RE – Year 2 Part 1 FPR
Part 1 (pages 1-4):
Includes 4 prompts to be
completed by the RE:
1. Instructional Cycle (required)
2. Lesson Analysis (Optional)
3. Communication (Required)
4. Professional Growth and
Collaboration (Required)
RE – Year 2 – Part 2 FPR
Part 2 (page 5)
• Invites the Mentor to
facilitate the FPR
through inquiry
• This Inquiry process
engages the RE in
deeper analysis of FPR
responses
RE – Year 2 – Prompt 2 FPR
RE – Year 2 – Prompt 3 FPR
RE – Year 2 – Prompt 4 FPR
RE – Year 2 Mentor Prompt
Inquiry
RE – RESA Tasks
Resident Educator: Years 3-4
During YEARS 3-4 of the Resident Educator Program, the Resident
Educator will
YEAR 3

Prepare for summative assessment
Year 3/4

Successfully complete summative assessment
Year 4



Participate in professional development and leadership roles
Re-take any deficient portions of summative assessment
Complete Resident Educator program requirements then apply for the 5year professional license which includes securing the signatures of the
mentor and superintendent or designee
System of Support
What will the
MENTOR
do to support
the RE?
Mentor
To provide support for the RE program, the mentor will

Attend all required training to obtain certification

Communicate with the Resident Educator, program
coordinator and principal
Respect the confidential relationship with the Resident
Educator and principal


Support the Resident Educator through the use of
formative assessment processes, protocols and tools

Collaborate with the program coordinator to complete
end-of-year Formative Progress Review
Let’s Review (Self Assessment)
Mentor: Year 2 and Year 3 (Non RESA)
Facilitator: Year 3 and Year 4 (RESA)
YEAR 2:

Provide in-depth instructional mentoring of Year 2 timeline
 One-to-one mentoring, co-teaching and/or cohort collaboration
YEAR 3 MENTOR (NON RESA):

Continue in-depth instructional mentoring noted above
Year 3 Facilitator (RESA):

Support the RE in preparing for their RESA Tasks
YEAR 4:


Facilitate and support the Resident Educator to “re-take“ deficient
portions of summative assessment
Facilitate Resident Educator participation in professional development and
leadership activities
Why
SMART Goals?
Goals that state a Desired Future Achievement
SMART Goals assist in “getting focused”
SMART goals help define exactly what the “future
state” looks like
SMART goals measure the progress of achieving the
“future state”
SMART goals demonstrate how work “aligns”
and relates to overall focus
SMART Goals
S – Specific
M – Measureable
A – Attainable
R – Realistic/Relevant/Results Oriented
T - Timely
How To Write
SMART
Goals
S - Specific
• Well Defined, the outcome is clear
• Clear to ANYONE who has basic knowledge of the project
• Provides enough detail so there is no indecision as to what is to
be done
Poor Example
I will lose weight.
Better Example
I will lose 5 lbs by June 1 by
eliminating sugar from my diet
and walking 10,000 steps a day.
How To Write
5 – W’s
SMART
Goals
S - Specific
Who is involved?
When will the
goal be achieved?
What do I want to
accomplish?
Where will the
action take place?
Why is this goal
important?
For Educators link to the bigger picture –
school goals/climate.
How To Write
SMART
Goals
M - Measurable
•
•
•
•
Know if the goal is obtainable and how far way the completion date is
Know when it has been achieved
Identify the measurement instrument to be used
Able to determine if it has been achieved because you can count it or see it
Poor Example
I will lose weight.
Better Example
I will lose 5 lbs by June 1 by
eliminating sugar from my diet
and walking 10,000 steps a day.
How To Write
SMART
Goals
M - Measurable
How Many?
How Much?
To What degree?
How will I know when it is
accomplished?
How To Write
SMART
Goals
A - Attainable
• Agreement with all the stakeholders what the goals should be
• Achievable a goal may be a stretch, but is possible with the current team
and resources
• Clearly defined steps
Poor Example
I will lose weight.
Better Example
I will lose 5 lbs by June 1 by
eliminating sugar from my diet
and walking 10,000 steps a day.
How To Write
SMART
Goals
R - Realistic
•
•
•
•
Who is the main person responsible?
Who are the support people?
What are the urgent needs?
The goal is aligned with the results expected and the direction provided by
the district CSIP and building goals.
Poor Example
I will lose weight.
Better Example
I will lose 5 lbs by June 1 by
eliminating sugar from my diet
and walking 10,000 steps a day.
How To Write
SMART
Goals
T - Timely
• A specific date has been set for achieving the goal
• Time is appropriate for keeping goal performance
focused and on target
Poor Example
I will lose weight.
Better Example
I will lose 5 lbs by June 1 by
eliminating sugar from my diet
and walking 10,000 steps a day.
How To Write SMART Goals
Long Term Goals
~VS~
Short Term Goals
Writing
SMART
Goals
Goal:
Specific
•
•
•
Well-defined, the outcome is clear
Clear to anyone who has a basic knowledge of the project
Provides enough detail so there is no indecision as to what is to be done
Measurable
•
•
•
•
Know if the goal is obtainable and how far away the completion is
Know when it has been achieved
Identify the measurement instrument to be used
Able to determine if it has been achieved because you can count it or see
it
Attainable
•
•
Agreement with all the stakeholders what the goals should be
Achievable; a goal may be a stretch, but it is possible with the current
team and resources
Clearly defined steps
•
Realistic
•
•
•
•
Who is the main person responsible?
Who are the support people?
What are the urgent needs?
The goal is aligned with the results expected and the direction provided
by the district CSIP and building goals
Timely
•
•
A specific date has been set for achieving the goal
Time is appropriate for keeping goal performance focused and on target
How To Write SMART Goals
Improve this goal…..
Example Goal 1:
I will improve my proximity and
attention to students to enhance
student learning by staying focused
on classroom activities and actively
assessing learner engagement.
Now it is your turn…..
Example Goal 1:
I will improve my proximity and attention to students to
enhance student learning by staying focused on classroom
activities and actively assessing learner engagement.
State an
intention to
Engage in
Learning
(action verb)
Describe an
Area of Focus
(What?)
Include the
Relevance
(Why?)
Proximity Enhance
I will
and
Student
improve
attention Learning
Add the
Activities that
will get you
there (how?)
By staying
focused on
activities and
formatively
assessing
Predict a
completion
date
(When?)
Improve this goal…..
Example Goal 2:
I will make explicit connections from
one lesson to the next, to improve
student comprehension of my
content area and show my mentor
evidence of the same at our next
meeting.
Now it is your turn…..
Example Goal 2:
I will make explicit connections from one lesson to the next, to
improve student comprehension of my content area and show
my mentor evidence of the same at our next meeting.
State an
intention to
Engage in
Learning
(action verb)
I will
make
connections
Describe an
Area of Focus
(What?)
Include the
Relevance
(Why?)
Lesson to To improve
student
lesson
comprehension
Add the
Activities
that will get
you there
(how?)
Predict a
completion date
(When?)
By the
next
meeting
Improve this goal…..
This year every student will show
evidence of one year of growth in
mathematics.
Writing
SMART
Goals
Original: This year every student will show evidence of one year
of growth in mathematics.
• SMART Goal: During the 2013-14 school year,
85% of all students will improved their math
problem solving skills as measured by a 1.0 year
gain in national grade equivalent growth from
the 2013-14 to the 2014-15 ITBS math problem
solving sub test.
Now it is your turn…..
State an
intention to
Engage in
Learning
(action verb)
Describe an
Area of Focus
(What?)
Include the
Relevance
(Why?)
Add the
Activities that
will get you
there (how?)
Predict a
completion
date
(When?)
One more thing about goals…..
What are appropriate goals?
What are important goals?
What kinds of goals are worthwhile?
“Helping Teachers Set Goals” by Thomas
McGreal from Ed Leadership 2/80
There are three categories of goals:
Program Goals:
•
•
•
•
To review and make appropriate changes in a 7th grade
ELA program
To introduce the new reading series to the 2nd grade team
To improve articulation between science programs in 4th
and 5th grade
To review the thematic units used in my 5th grade social
studies program
There are three categories of goals:
Learner Goals:
•
•
•
At least 80 % of the students will be able to correctly solve
at least 80% of the problems on a long division test.
The students will be able to demonstrate the ability to write
a descriptive essay by scoring a 3 on a 4 point rubric by
the end of the first semester.
At least 70% of my students will be reading at grade level
by February 15.
There are three categories of goals:
Teaching Goals:
•
•
•
Tailor my questioning style to meet the needs of different
ability groups in my classroom
Develop procedures for increasing the amount and quality
of student-teacher verbal interaction during classroom
discussions
Use formal cooperative learning strategies involving
heterogeneous groups to help students prepare for unit
tests.
SMART Goals Quiz
Reflection of Lesson
Begin by opening your Resident
Educator Folder at:
http://www.southernohioesc.org/
OTES Framework—Professional
Growth Plan
57
What is your Goal?
Self
Assessment
Previous FPR
reflection
Self Assessment
Summary Sheet
Informal
Observation Notes
http://www.ted.com/talks/rita_pierson_every_kid_needs_a_cham
pion.html
Where do I begin?
The Data Measures Inventory tool asks mentors and Resident Educators to
examine basic demographic data and gather formative assessment data to
determine student learning priorities and eventually to monitor student
progress.
Assessment of Student Learning
(Red Expectations)
2012-2013 Report Data
Anywhere Local
Schools
Look By:
District
Building
Assessment of Student Learning
Coming in 2015
• K-3 Literacy
• Prepared for Success
Assessment of Student Learning
(Red Expectations)
District/Subject Value-Added Report:
5 Most
Effective
4 Above
Average
3 Average
2 Approaching
Average
1 Least Effective
Achievement –vs- Value Added Matrix
P.I. Score
Achievement Line
Value Added
Line
Standard
Deviation
Achievement –vs- Value Added Matrix
Learning
Above Value Added
Low Achievement
Lagging
Below Value Added
Low Achievement
Leading
Above Value Added
High Achievement
Lucky
Below Value Added
High Achievement
District Value Added Report
Diagnostic (Building Level)
Diagnostic (Teacher Level)
Drill Down to Student List
Student Projections in EVAAS
Assessment of Student Learning
(Red Expectations)
SUCCESS Website
http://portal.success-odestate-oh-us.info/
Assessment of Student Learning
Pull most current
testing data and
look at student
weaknesses by
strands, etc…
Assessment of Student Learning
Compare your
school performance
to that of the state
Assessment of Student Learning
Get all testing
history on a given
student
Other Data Sources…….
Renaissance Place
AIMSweb
MAP Testing
ProCore
Talk to your administrators….
Class Profile tool empowers Resident Educators with the
information necessary to create a class profile to inform their understanding
of the students’ varied learning needs.
The Intentional Instructional Grouping tool allows
Resident Educators to use data to
intentionally group students for various activities
specific to students’ learning goals.
This data tool allows Resident Educators to identify a
limited number of students and
monitor their learning in depth.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brYB7Du6oj
8&safe=active
Evidence of Big Foot
“Make It Stronger”
Effective teaching is a dynamic mixture of expertise
in a vast array of instructional strategies combined
with a profound understanding of the individual
students in class and their needs at particular
points in time.

Berliner in Marzano (2007) The Art and Science of Teaching
Instructional Planning: Cycles 1, 2 & 3





Translate data gathered into action
Action influences instruction
Explore the “thinking behind the thinking” in instructional
planning
Reflect on the lesson after the instruction
Examine student work to monitor student learning
The Power of Connection
and
Reflection
Reflection and Revision: Analyzing Individual Student Work
enables resident educators to examine their practice through
the indepth analysis of the two students they previously
identified in the Monitoring of Student Learning protocol.
Multiple sources of student artifacts should be collected to
support the analysis of each student’s work.
Review Your Formative
Progress Review
1. Review the highlighted questions
found on Instructional Cycle 1
2. Next, using your lesson plan or a plan
that has been provided to you begin the
reflection process.
3. Record your responses to the
Instructional Cycle Document. Use paperpencil or electronic version.
Guiding Questions for Examining Student Work
Is the work good enough, that is, does it meet our expectations for high
quality work?
What is “good enough,” and how can we illustrate good work for students?
What do the students’ responses indicate about the effectiveness of a
prompt or assignment? Have you attempted this task as written? How might
this assignment be improved to support high-quality student performance?
What does the work tell about how well the student understands the topic
of the assignment?
How does the range of work from a single student demonstrate growth in
(_____) over time? To what extent is the student challenging him-or herself?
In what ways?
Are there patterns and trends that relate to the class profile information?
How will this information be used in future lesson and assessment design?
From Looking Together at Student Work by Blythe, Allen & Powell (1999)
How is it possible for a teacher to include
every element of an effective lesson in a
lesson plan and deliver an ineffective
lesson?
Elements of an Effective
Lesson
Reflection-Mona Lisa Smiles
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9R2MRYwv_Y
Mona Lisa’s First Day
What data is Mona Lisa collecting?
What are some of the data sources?
What does she do with the data?
How does she translate it into meaningful
information to inform instruction?
What deliberate feedback would you give Mona
Lisa that will provide her clear action steps for
progress?
What insights to the first day of school,
annually exhibited by all teachers, does this clip
show?
What attributes of good instruction did Mona
Lisa exhibit?
What elements of complexity of teaching did
Mona Lisa discover on this first day?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2RqJIXFpYw






What preparation did Mona Lisa do to prepare to return to class?
How much of her preparation was listening to advice and being
mentored, and how much was her own individual reflection, study
and planning?
What evidence do you have to support that Mona Lisa knows her
subject content?
Trace Mona Lisa’s action plan according to Bloom’s Taxonomy.
What was the level of learning that the students had mastered in
video clip #1?
Where does Mona Lisa take them according to Bloom’s?
What is the students’ immediate reaction?
How can I be a better educator today than I was yesterday?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5SZ5UcmROY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHCUoDf7KGA
How can I be a better educator today than I was yesterday?



What is she thinking? Trace Mona Lisa’s thinking in each of the
four video clips. How has she pushed her students forward in
their thinking?
Explain the importance of the last clip. How does it relate to
authentic assessment and performance products?
How will you teach differently because of this experience with
Mona Lisa?
SMART Goal Quiz
Goal Number
TYPE
P/L/T?
1
L
P
T
L
L
P
T
L
P
T
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
S.M.A.R.T
Y/N?
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
First Step After Today…..
Set up your SAFE Account
…How can we be reflective practitioners if the
experience from which we’re supposed to be
learning disappears from view as soon as it
happens?
…an answer to this question is “artifacts.”
Artifacts are things– objects, tools, instruments– that
human beings construct because they are needed
but don’t exist in nature. Constructing an artifact is
by definition an unnatural act. And yet, I would
argue that artifacts are the key to learning by
experience.
Lee Shulmann (2002) Forgive & Remember: Launching the Next Generation of Teachers
Both the support of teacher development and the
evaluation of teacher performance require
evidence of practice….
Conversations about teaching must be grounded in
actual events, in actions or statements, in artifacts,
or in decisions teachers have made. Without such
grounding, impressions of teachers’ skills are based
entirely on the observers’ own idiosyncratic views
of teaching and their understandings of what has
occurred and what those events mean….
Mentors and coaches, no less than evaluators,
depend for their work on evidence of practice.
Charlotte Danielson (2008) The Handbook of Professional Practice

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