DOCUMENTING INSTRUCTIONAL EXCELLENCE IDEAS AND EVIDENCE FOR TEACHING PORTFOLIOS & DOSSIERS May 27, 2004 Please email questions, ideas, suggestions, & comments to Eileen Barrett, Professor of English [email protected]

Report
DOCUMENTING
INSTRUCTIONAL EXCELLENCE
IDEAS AND EVIDENCE FOR TEACHING PORTFOLIOS
&
DOSSIERS
May 27, 2004
Please email questions, ideas, suggestions, & comments to Eileen Barrett,
Professor of English
[email protected]
SEVEN BASIC TIPS FROM
SUE SCHAEFER
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START NOW & DON’T STOP
APPEARANCES COUNT
FOCUS ON THE DOCUMENTS
EXPLAIN
USE PROBLEMS POSITIVELY
ASK FOR ADVICE
DON’T DRAW CONCLUSIONS
CURRICULUM VITAE &
EXPLANATORY NARRATIVES
A CURRENT C.V. OR RESUME THAT LISTS YOUR RELEVANT TEACHING
EXPERIENCE
A NARRATIVE OR LETTER THAT DESCRIBES AND EXPLAINS YOUR
TEACHING PHILOSOPHY
TIPS ON DEVELOPING A TEACHING PHILOSOPHY
--KEEP A TEACHING JOURNAL FOR IDEAS
--DRAFT, DEVELOP, REVISE YOUR PHILOSOPHY
--TIE YOUR PHILOSOPHY TO PROGRAM, DEPARTMENT, COLLEGE, OR
UNIVERSITY MISSION
--EXPLAIN HOW YOUR COURSE GOALS SUPPORT THE GOALS AND
OBJECTIVES OF RELEVANT CURRICULUM
--MENTION HOW YOUR PARTICIPATION IN TEACHING WORKSHOPS &
OTHER ACTVITIES INFORMS YOUR DEVELOPMENT AS AN
INSTRUCTOR
--WRITE WITH YOUR READER IN MIND
CLASSROOM EVIDENCE
• SUPPORT YOUR NARRATIVE WITH
SELECTIVE & RELEVANT EVIDENCE SUCH
AS
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SYLLABI
CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
QUIZZES, TESTS, EXAMS
PROJECTS
ORAL ASSIGNMENTS
WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS
SAMPLES OF STUDENT WORK
EVIDENCE OF CREATIVITY IN
COURSEWORK SUCH AS
• INNOVATIVE & RELEVANT VIDEO OR
WEB MATERIALS
• CREATIVE/ UNIQUE CLASSROOM
ASSIGNMENTS
• BLACKBOARD MATERIALS
• SERVICE LEARNING PROJECTS
• CAMPUS & COMMUNITY
CONNECTIONS
EVIDENCE OF MULTIPLE LEVEL &
INTERDISCIPLINARY, & SELFREFLECTIVE TEACHING MIGHT INCLUDE
• RANGE OF UNDERGRADUATE COURSES
• RANGE OF GRADUATE COURSES
• RANGE OF FORMATS—LARGE LECTURE, MID-SIZE
LECTURE/DISCUSSION, SEMINAR, ONLINE OR
PARTIALLY ONLINE
• REVISIONS OF FREQUENTLY TAUGHT COURSES
• THEMATICALLY LINKED CLUSTER MATERIALS
• COLLABORATIVE WORK WITH DEPARTMENTAL,
COLLEGE, AND UNIVERSITY COLLEAGUES
• ATTENDANCE AT DEPARTMENTAL, UNIVERSITY,
SYSTEM OR PROFESSIONAL FACULTY
DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS
PEER EVALUATIONS
• SUMMATIVE EVALUATIONS FROM
COLLEAGUES WHO VISIT YOUR CLASS
• FORMATIVE EVALUATION FROM FACULTY
DEVELOPMENT
• LETTERS FROM COLLEAGUES IN WHOSE
CLASSES YOU HAVE PRESENTED
• LETTERS FROM COLLEAGUES WITH WHOM
YOU HAVE SHARED SYLLABI,
ASSIGNMENTS, OR COLLABORATED IN
OTHER WAYS
STUDENT EVALUATIONS
IMPARTIALLY ADMINISTERED STUDENT
COURSE EVALUATIONS WITH
TABULATED RESULTS FROM OFFICE OF
ASSESSMENT & TESTING
UNEDITED SUMMARIES OF STUDENT
COMMENTS
UNSOLICITED LETTERS OF APPRECIATION
FROM STUDENTS
UNSOLICITED EMAILS WITH SUBSTANTIVE
COMMENTS FROM STUDENTS
INFORMAL FEEDBACK ON
STUDENT LEARNING
• CLASSROOM ASSESSMENT
TECHNIQUES PROVIDE ANONYMOUS
STUDENT RESPONSES TO
QUESTIONS ABOUT
– DAILY LECTURE AND DISCUSSION
– COMPREHENSION OF COURSE MATERIAL
– KNOWLEDGE OF STUDENTS’ LEARNING
PROCESS
See Angelo & Cross, Classroom Assessment
Techniques, for excellent models
USING CHICKERING AND GAMSON’S SEVEN
PRINCIPLES FOR GOOD PRACTICE IN
UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION
See the March 1987 Bulletin of AAHE for
Arthur Chickering and Zelda Gamson’s
original article about these principles.
http://www.aahebulletin.com/public/archive/se
venprinciples1987.asp
1. Good Practice Encourages Contacts
Between Students and Faculty
Frequent student-faculty contact in and out
of class is a most important factor in
student motivation and involvement.
Faculty concern helps students get
through rough times and keep on working.
Knowing a few faculty members well
enhances students’ intellectual
commitment and encourages them to think
about their own values and plans.
Chickering & Gamson
EVIDENCE OF CONTACT WITH
STUDENTS MIGHT INCLUDE
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RECORDS OF OFFICE HOURS
RECORDS OF ADVISING SESSIONS
SAMPLE EMAIL RESPONSES TO STUDENTS
INDEPENDENT STUDIES, INTERNSHIPS, & THESES
SUPERVISION OF STUDENTS’ PRESENTATIONS OR
PERFORMANCES AT CONFERENCES, FESTIVALS,
GALLERIES, MEETS, etc.
SAMPLE LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION
WORK WITH STUDENT GROUPS
ASSISTANCE WITH STUDENTS’ CAMPUS
FUNCTIONS
MENTORING OF STUDENTS
2. Good Practice Develops Reciprocity
and Cooperation Among Students
• Learning is enhanced when it is more like
a team effort than a solo race. Good
learning, like good work, is collaborative
and social, not competitive and isolated.
Working with others often increases
involvement in learning. Sharing one’s
ideas and responding to others’ improves
thinking and deepens understanding.
Chickering & Gamson
POSSIBLE EVIDENCE OF CLASSROOM
COLLABORATION
• ICE BREAKING ACTIVITIES THAT CREATE RAPPORT
AMONG STUDENTS
• DESIGNS FOR GROUP WORK AND PROJECTS
• ORGANIZED ROLE PLAYING, DEBATES, &
PERFORMANCES
• STUDENT GENERATED ACTIVITIES & PROJECTS
• GUIDELINES FOR PEER EVALUATIONS
• STUDY GROUPS AMONG STUDENTS
• USE OF BLACKBOARD DISCUSSION GROUPS
3. Good Practice Uses Active Learning
Techniques
• Learning is not a spectator sport. Students
do not learn much just sitting in classes
listening to teachers, memorizing
prepackaged assignments, and spitting
out answers. They must talk about what
they are learning, write reflectively about it,
relate it to past experiences, and apply it
to their daily lives. They must make what
they learn part of themselves.
Chickering & Gamson
POSSIBLE EVIDENCE OF ACTIVE
LEARNING
• INSTRUCTIONS & STRATEGIES FOR NOTE TAKING
• OUTLINES OF LECTURES THAT SHOW TIME FOR
REFLECTION AND QUESTIONS
• WRITING TO LEARN ACTIVITIES
• STUDENT PRESENTATIONS
• LAB ASSIGNMENTS & ACTIVITIES
• FIELD TRIPS, MUSEUM VISITS
• PERFORMANCE ACTIVITIES
• RESEARCH ASSIGNMENTS
• COURSE PORTFOLIO PROJECTS
• SELF REFLECTIVE LEARNING JOURNALS
4. Good Practice Gives Prompt Feedback
• Knowing what you know and don’t know focuses
your learning. In getting started, students need
help in assessing their existing knowledge and
competence. Then, in classes, students need
frequent opportunities to perform and receive
feedback on their performance. At various points
during college, and at its end, students need
chances to reflect on what they have learned,
what they still need to know, and how they might
assess themselves.
Chickering & Gamson
EVIDENCE OF FEEDBACK AND STUDENT
SELF-REFLECTION SUCH AS
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SCHEDULE OF GRADED WORK
SAMPLE DIAGNOSTIC OR BASE-LEVEL TESTS
SAMPLE QUIZZES, TESTS
GRADING RUBRICS FOR VARIOUS ASSIGNMENTS
COMMENTS ON LECTURE NOTES, READING
JOURNALS, AND LAB ASSIGNMENTS
CUMULATIVE COURSE PORTFOLIOS
SELF EVALUATION ACTIVITIES
SAMPLE COMMENTS ON STUDENT WORK
SAMPLE STUDENT PROGRESS REPORTS
5. Good Practice Emphasizes Time on
Task
• Time plus energy equals learning.
Learning to use one’s time well is critical
for students and professionals alike.
Allocating realistic amounts of time means
effective learning for students and
effective teaching for faculty.
Chickering & Gamson
EVIDENCE OF TIME ON TASK MIGHT
INCLUDE
• DETAILED COURSE CALENDAR WITH
DATES FOR DRAFTS OR PORTIONS OF
PAPERS & PROJECTS
• TIME-MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES—
WEEKLY SCHEDULES FOR STUDENTS
• ATTENDANCE POLICIES
• POLICIES ON LATE WORK
6. Good Practice Communicates High
Expectations
• Expect more and you will get it. High
expectations are important for everyone —
for the poorly prepared, for those unwilling
to exert themselves, and for the bright and
well motivated. Expecting students to
perform well becomes a self-fulfilling
prophecy.
Chickering & Gamson
POSSIBLE EVIDENCE OF HIGH
EXPECTATIONS
• COURSE GOALS AND REQUIREMENTS
• USE OF MODELS OF STUDENTS’ BEST
WORK
• RECOMMENDED READINGS AND
ASSIGNMENTS
• EXTRA CREDIT ACTIVITIES
• ENCOURAGING STUDENTS TO JOIN
PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS & ATTEND
CONFERENCES
• VISITS FROM FORMER SUCCESSFUL
STUDENTS & LEADERS IN THE FIELD
7. Good Practice Respects Diverse
Talents and Ways of Learning
• Many roads lead to learning. Different students
bring different talents and styles to college.
Brilliant students in a seminar might be all
thumbs in a lab or studio; students rich in handson experience may not do so well with theory.
Students need opportunities to show their talents
and learn in ways that work for them. Then they
can be pushed to learn in new ways that do not
come so easily.
Chickering & Gamson
EVIDENCE OF DIVERSE TEACHING
STRATEGIES & RESPECT FOR STUDENT
DIVERSITY MIGHT INCLUDE
• RULES FOR RESPECTFUL CLASSROOMS
• DIFFERENT TESTING OPTIONS
• ASSIGNMENTS THAT TEST DIFFERENT
SKILLS
• USE OF VISUAL, AUDIO, AND WRITTEN
MATERIALS
• ACTIVITIES RELEVANT TO THE DIVERSITY
OF THE STUDENTS
• ATTENTION TO ACHIEVEMENTS OF WOMEN
AND PEOPLE OF COLOR IN THE DISCIPLINE
• POLICY ON STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
YOUR FEEDBACK
TO DEVELOP IDEAS ON CAMPUS FOR
DOCUMENTING HOW OUR TEACHING
ENHANCES STUDENT LEARNING, WE
WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU. PLEASE
SEND YOUR IDEAS,COMMENTS,
QUESTIONS ABOUT THIS PRESENTATION,
THE SEVEN PRINCIPLES, & THE EVIDENCE
YOU MIGHT USE IN A PORTFOLIO OR
DOSSIER TO Eileen Barrett,
[email protected]

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