PowerPoint Day 1

Report
CORE ACADEMY 2013
GRADE BAND 2 & 3
WELCOME!
• My name is _____
• I teach at: _____
• I’ve taught for _____
years.
• My item is _____, and
it represents me
because_____.
• How many years
combined teaching
experience is in this
room?
UTAH CORE STANDARDS
THE STANDARDS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS K -5
THE APPENDICES FOR THE STANDARDS
STANDARDS BASED ON RESEARCH
INSTRUCTIONAL SHIFTS IN THE NEW
STANDARDS
1. Building knowledge through content-rich
informational text
2. Reading, writing and speaking grounded in
evidence from text, both literature and informational
text
3. Regular practice with complex text and its
academic language
THE STRANDS
RF
RI
RL
Foundational
Skills
Reading
Informational
Text
Reading
Literature
L
SL
W
Language
Speaking and
Listening
Writing
LABELING OUR CORE
Reading Anchor Standards – pg 12
Reading for Literature RL - pg 13
Reading for Informational Text RI – pg 15
Reading Foundational Skills RF – pg 17
Writing Anchor Standards W – pg 21
Speaking and Listening SL - pg 25
Language Anchor Standards L - 28
LABELING CONTINUED
In Appendix A - Articles
•
•
•
•
•
•
Text Complexity – pg 3
Foundational Skills – pg 18
Writing Text Types – pg 24
Speaking and Listening – pg 27
Language – pg 29
Vocabulary – pg 33
CLOSE READING
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
Page 12 in key ideas and details number 1
Close reading is not a standard but a practice through
which the standards are achieved.
WHAT IS CLOSE READING?
• Close reading is thoughtful, critical analysis of a text
that focuses on significant details or patterns in
order to develop a deep, precise understanding of
the text’s form, craft, meanings, etc.
• It is a key requirement of the Common Core State
Standards and directs the reader’s attention to the
text itself. [email protected] 2013
CLOSE READING
• Read Article “Close Reading in Elementary
Classrooms” By Fisher & Frey
• Underline key words and phrases that are meaningful.
• What would a “first read” look like with grade level text in
your classroom?
• Close Reading Prezi
SCAFFOLDING STUDENTS IN CLOSE
READING
• While the goal for students is to read complex texts
independently, not all students will be able to
achieve that immediately.
• Scaffolding instruction is a model in which the
teacher supports students and gradually releases
responsibility to the student.
SCAFFOLDING CLOSE READING
• Shared reading
• Interactive read aloud
• Comprehension Toolkit lessons
• Literature circles
• Reciprocal teaching
• Graphic Organizers
• Jigsaws
CLOSE READING INCLUDES:
Using short passages and excerpts
Diving right into the text with limited pre-reading
activities
Focusing on the text itself
Rereading deliberately
Reading with a pencil
Noticing things that are confusing
Discussing the text with others
Think-Pair Share or Turn and Talk frequently
Small groups and whole class
Responding to text-dependent questions
[email protected] 2013
STEPS IN CLOSE READING
• There is no specific sequence in a close read; these
steps are meant to generally guide you in crafting a
lesson that scaffolds students and focuses on
increasingly complex text dependent questions.
• Begin with questions about the big ideas in the text
and gradually ask higher level questions.
[email protected] 2013
FIRST READ: KEY IDEAS AND DETAILS
• Set the purpose for reading and have students read text
as independently as possible.
• Depending on the text complexity and the readers, the
first read may be done independently, as a read
aloud/think aloud, or paired or shared reading.
• The first read should be without building background;
students should be integrating their background
knowledge with the text as they read.
• Focus on the key ideas and details in the text, making
sure that readers know the main idea, story elements, or
key details that the author includes.
• Following the first read, have students Think-Pair-Share to assess
what they have gleaned from the text. By listening to students
as they share, you can determine the focus of the first read,
etc. [email protected] 2013
SECOND READ: CRAFT AND STRUCTURE
• For a second close read, select a portion or chunk of the
text that is “close read worthy.” That is, have students
reread a section that includes complex elements or
ideas that they should explore to arrive at a deep
understanding of the text.
• After rereading, students discuss the text with partners or
in small groups, focusing on the author’s craft and
organizational patterns. This may include vocabulary
choices, text structure, or text features that the author
included.
• Use a Text Dependent Questions to focus or set a purpose for a
close rereading. After students share with partners or in small
groups, have groups share out with entire class to assess
understanding. [email protected] 2013
THIRD READ: INTEGRATION OF
KNOWLEDGE AND IDEAS
• The third close reading of a text should go even
deeper, requiring students to synthesize and
analyze information from several texts or media.
They may record their ideas on sticky notes, graphic
organizers, or thinking sheets.
• Have students journal a response to a Text Dependent
Question. Focus the discussion on text evidence.
[email protected] 2013
TEXT-DEPENDENT
QUESTIONING
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
Page 7: They demonstrate independence.
INCREASED TIME IN TEXT
•
More instructional time spent outside the text means
less time inside the text.
•
Departing from the text in classroom discussion
privileges only those who already have experience
with the topic.
•
It is easier to talk about our experiences than to
analyze the text—especially for students reluctant
to engage with reading or thinking.
•
The Utah Core Standards are College and Career
Readiness Standards.
MYTHS ABOUT TEXT-DEPENDENT
QUESTIONS
•
These are low-level, literal, or recall questions
•
They are focused on comprehension strategies
•
They make front-loading illegal or say we never
access background knowledge
THREE TYPES OF TEXT-DEPENDENT
QUESTIONS
•
Questions that assess themes and central
ideas
•
Questions that assess knowledge of
vocabulary, meaning, and structure
•
Questions that assess understanding of the
author’s claims/argument or relationship to
another text
25
NON-EXAMPLES AND EXAMPLES
Not Text-Dependent
Text-Dependent
In “Casey at the Bat,” Casey
strikes out. Describe a time when
you failed at something.
What makes Casey’s experiences
at bat humorous?
In “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,”
Dr. King discusses nonviolent
protest. Discuss, in writing, a time
when you wanted to fight against
something that you felt was unfair.
What can you infer from King’s
letter about the letter that he
received?
In “The Gettysburg Address”
Lincoln says the nation is
dedicated to the proposition that
all men are created equal. Why is
equality an important value to
27
promote?
“The Gettysburg Address”
mentions the year 1776.
According to Lincoln’s speech,
why is this year significant to the
events described in the speech?
CREATING TEXT-DEPENDENT
QUESTIONS
Step One:
Step Two:
Identify the core understandings and key
ideas of the text.
Start with level 1 questions that target specific
content and details to build confidence.
Step
Three:
Move to level 2 questions. Target vocabulary
and text structure: have students think about
how the information is conveyed.
Step Four:
Ask them level 3 questions: what does the
author want you to believe, how do you know
that, and is there evidence?
Step Five:
Create the culminating assessment.
28
LOOKING AT LEVEL 1
KEY IDEAS & DETAILS
INFORMATIONAL TEXT
LEVEL 1
KEY IDEAS & DETAILS
STARTING A CLOSE READING LESSON
• Choose a text
• Determine the essential question
•
•
•
•
•
Backwards by design
Promotes inquiry
Gets students into the text
Must be a question
Guides and ties the learning together
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
Along with the Key Ideas & Details in the Reading
Strands, we are looking at Science Standards so we
can integrate.
INFORMATIONAL TEXT LESSON
LEVEL 1
• We chose the Moon Book by Gail Gibbons to integrate our
Science content with our Language Arts.
• Looking at the 2nd & 3rd grade Science Standards, we came
up with our essential question to guide our learning.
• What are the characteristics of the Earth and Moon?
• Science & Reading Informational Text Standards
• Observe, describe, and record patterns in the appearance and
apparent motion of the moon in the night sky.
• 2nd Grade Standard 2 Obj. 2
• List the characteristics of the appearance of the Earth and moon.
3rd Grade Standard 1 Obj. 1 (a-c)
• LA Core RI2.3 and RI3.2
LEVEL 1 TEXT-DEPENDENT QUESTIONS
KEY IDEAS & DETAILS
• Where does the moon get its light?
• What characteristics does the text provide that help
us to understand the physical appearance of the
Earth and Moon?
LITERATURE
LEVEL 1
KEY IDEAS & DETAILS
WHERE IS THIS IN THE UTAH CORE?
Page 13 - RL2.2
Page 14 - RL3.3
LITERATURE LESSON LEVEL 1
Essential questions set the purpose for reading the text.
Our essential question for this book was:
• “What did the author, Jaqueline Woodson, want us to
learn about becoming a better citizen?”
• 2nd Grade SS standard 2: Students will recognize and
practice civic responsibility in the community, state, and
nation.
• 3rd Grade SS standard 3: Students will understand the
principles of civic responsibility in classroom, community,
and country.
LEVEL 1 TEXT DEPENDENT QUESTIONS
KEY IDEAS & DETAILS
• What is the genre of this text? What evidence from the text,
including pictures, supports your conclusion?
• What is the problem of the story?
• According to the text how do the characters overcome their
problem?(RL.2.2)
• Look at illustrations and text on pages 5 and 6 (picture of girls
playing jump rope) and pictures on page 25 and 26 (second
picture of jump rope). Use a T chart to compare the
illustrations and the text.
• What sequence of events brought about the change in the
characters represented by the two pictures? (RL.3.3)
WRITING LEVEL 1 QUESTIONS
General Understanding question stem examples:
What does this mean?
What is the main point/claim/argument?
How is information ordered?
Key Details question stem examples:
What are some details that prove/support/define the claim of the
point or argument?
What does the author mean when s/he writes ____________________?
Who? What? When? Where? Why? How much? How many?
CREATE A LEVEL 1 QUESTION FROM
THIS SELECTION
HOMEWORK
• Read your book “Each
Kindness”
• Using a blank close
Reading Lesson Template
for Literature, Develop an
essential question you
want to use for the book
and create at least one
level 1question for the text
• Write your question(s) on
the sheet provided to
share tomorrow
HEARTS AND WISHES
• 3 Hearts are things you will take back, or
that you found helpful.
• A Wish is something you need more
information on or we did not cover.
Something you WISH you knew more
about from today (please don’t comment
on things like temperature etc.).

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