The PowerPoint She Made

Report
Advances in
the PARCC
ELA/Literacy
Assessment
1
PARCC Membership
2
Common Core Assessment Timeline
SY 2010-11
Launch and
design phase
3
SY 2011-12
Development
begins
SY 2012-13
SY 2013-14
SY 2014-15
First year
pilot/field
testing and
related research
and data
collection
Second year
pilot/field
testing and
related research
and data
collection
Full
administration
of Common
Core
assessments
Summer 2015
Set
achievement
levels,
including
college-ready
performance
levels
College- and Career Ready
Determination
4
Meaning of a College- and CareerReady Determination
• PARCC intends to make two College- and Career- Ready
(CCR) Determinations
• Students who earn a College- and Career-Ready Determination in
ELA/literacy will have demonstrated the academic knowledge,
skills and practices necessary to enter directly into and succeed
in entry-level, credit-bearing courses in College English
Composition, Literature, and technical courses requiring collegelevel reading and writing.
5
Benefit of Earning a College- and CareerReady Determination
• Students who earn a CCR Determination will be exempt from
having to take and pass placement tests designed to determine
whether they are academically prepared to enter directly into
entry-level, credit-bearing courses in ELA/literacy, mathematics,
and technical courses requiring college-level reading, writing, or
mathematics skills .
• The CCR Determination is not intended to inform admission
decisions or exempt students from taking tests designed to place
them into more advanced courses than entry-level.
6
Criteria for Earning a
College- and Career- Ready Determination
• CCR Determinations will be awarded to students who achieve Level 4*
on the designated PARCC high school assessments in ELA/literacy and
mathematics.
• In order to achieve Level 4, students will need to demonstrate a strong
command of the knowledge and skills embodied by the Common Core
State Standards assessed on the designated PARCC high school
assessments.
• Options for determining the specific PARCC high school assessments
that will be used to make CCR Determinations will be discussed at the
December 2012 Governing Board meeting.
*Results of PARCC assessments will be reported using five
performance levels, Level 5 being the highest.
7
Standard-Setting/ Validation
Studies
The following statement will be used to inform standard-setting (determining cut
scores for PARCC performance levels) and to conduct future studies to validate the
efficacy of the CCR Determinations.
– Students who earn a College- and Career-Ready Determination by performing
at level 4 in ELA/literacy and enroll in College English Composition, Literature,
and technical courses requiring college-level reading and writing have
approximately a 0.75 probability of earning college credit by attaining at least a
grade of C or its equivalent in those courses.
8
PARCC
Performance Levels
9
Purposes of Performance Levels
• To report the results of assessment(s) used to make
College- and Career- Ready Determinations
• To report the results of high school end-of-grade
ELA/literacy assessments and end-of-course math
assessments (grades 9 and 10)
• To report the results of end-of-grade assessments for
grades 3-8
Number of Levels
• Five levels
– No names for the levels have been proposed. Level 4 is pitched to a level of
rigor currently described by NAEP’s Proficient Level (solid command of the
content). It is also the level for earning a CCR Determination.
11
General Definition of Each Level
• Level 5: Distinguished command of the knowledge, skills, and
practices embodied by the CCSS assessed at the grade level/
course.
• Level 4: Strong command …
• Level 3: Moderate command …
• Level 2: Partial command …
• Level 1: Minimal command …
12
General Content Claims
• In ELA/literacy, general content claims at each level describe how well students
are able to
– Read and comprehend a range of sufficiently complex text independently
– Write effectively when using and/or analyzing sources
– Build and present knowledge through the integration, comparison, and
synthesis of ideas
– Use of context to determine the meaning of words and phrases
13
PLDs for Reporting Results of Assessments used
to make College- and Career- Ready
Determinations
•
•
•
•
•
Level 5
– Distinguished command of the knowledge and skills contained in the CCSS assessed
– Academically well prepared to engage successfully in entry-level credit bearing courses in …..
– Exempt from having to take and pass placement tests designed to determine whether they are prepared for
entry-level, credit bearing courses without need for remediation
Level 4
– Strong command …
– Academically prepared …
– Exempt …
Level 3
– Moderate command …
– Will likely need academic support to engage successfully in entry-level, credit-bearing courses
– Not exempt …
Level 2
– Partial command …
– Will need academic support …
– Not exempt …
Level 1
– Minimal command …
– Will need extensive academic support …
– Not exempt …
PLDs for Reporting Results of
Grades 9 and 10 Assessments
•
•
•
•
•
Level 5
– Distinguished command…
– Academically well prepared to engage successfully in further studies in the content area
– On-track to become academically prepared to engage successfully in entry-level, credit bearing courses in …
Level 4
– Strong command …
– Academically prepared …
– On-track …
Level 3
– Moderate command …
– Will likely need academic support to engage successfully in further studies …
– Will likely need academic support to become prepared to engage successfully in entry-level ….
Level 2
– Partial command…
– Will need academic support to engage successfully in further studies …
– Will need academic support to become prepared to engage successfully in entry-level …
Level 1
– Minimal command …
– Will need extensive academic support to engage successfully in further studies …
– Will need extensive academic support to become prepared to engage successfully in entry-level …
PLDs for Reporting Results of
End-of-Grade Assessments for Grades 3-8
•
•
•
•
•
Level 5
– Distinguished command …
– Academically well prepared to engage successfully in further studies in the content area
Level 4
– Strong command …
– Academically prepared …
Level 3
– Moderate command
– Will likely need academic support to engage successfully …
Level 2
– Partial command …
– Will need academic support …
Level 1
– Minimal command
– Will need extensive academic support
The PARCC Goals
1. Create high-quality assessments
2. Build a pathway to college and career readiness for all
students
3. Support educators in the classroom
4. Develop 21st century, technology-based assessments
5. Advance accountability at all levels
17
Goal #1: Create High Quality Assessments
• PARCC is developing an assessment system comprised of four
components. Each component will be computer-delivered and will leverage
technology to incorporate innovations.
– Two summative assessment components designed to
• Make “college- and career-readiness” and “on-track” determinations
• Measure the full range of standards and full performance continuum
• Provide data for accountability uses, including measures of growth
– Two formative assessment components designed to
• Generate timely information for informing instruction, interventions,
and professional development during the school year
• In ELA/literacy, a third formative component will assess students’
speaking and listening skills
18
Assessment Design
2 Optional Assessments/Flexible Administration
Diagnostic Assessment
• Early indicator of
student knowledge
and skills to inform
instruction, supports,
and PD
• Non-summative
19
Mid-Year Assessment
• Performance-based
• Emphasis on hardto-measure
standards
• Potentially
summative
Speaking And Listening Assessment
• Locally scored
• Non-summative
Performance-Based
Assessment (PBA)
• Extended tasks
• Applications of
concepts and skills
• Required
End-of-Year
Assessment
• Innovative,
computer-based
items
• Required
Goal #1: Create High Quality Assessments
Required summative assessment components
• Performance‐Based Assessment (PBA) – administered about
the same time as current FCAT Writing, and comprised
primarily of performance tasks. Results incorporated into
summative score
• End-of-Year Assessment (EOY) – administered about the
same time as current EOCs, and comprised of innovative,
machine-scorable items. Results combined with PBA results
to yield a single summative score
20
Goal #1: Create High Quality Assessments
– Required summative assessment
components
• Grades 3-11 in English, Language Arts,
Literacy
• Grades 3-8 in Mathematics
• End-of-Course Mathematics tests in
Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2; or
Integrated Mathematics 1/2/3
21
Goal #1: Create High Quality Assessments
• In 2014-2015, Common Core summative assessments will
replace current FCAT 2.0 and End-of-Course tests currently
being administered in Writing, Reading, and Mathematics
• Current Florida assessments in non-Common Core content
areas will remain in place:
– FCAT 2.0 Science in Grades 5 and 8
– Florida’s Biology EOC assessment
– Florida’s US History EOC assessment
– Florida’s Civics EOC assessment
– Retakes for Florida’s Grade 10 Reading and EOCs as
required
22
Transition from FCAT to Common Core
Assessments
Assessments in 2012-13, and 2013-14
Assessments in 2014-15
FCAT 2.0 Reading Grades 3 to 10
Common Core English Language Arts
Grades 3 to 11
FCAT 2.0 Writing Grades 4, 8, 10
FCAT 2.0 Mathematics Grades 3 to 8
Common Core Mathematics Grades 3
to 8
Florida Algebra 1 EOC
Common Core Algebra 1 EOC
Florida Geometry EOC
Common Core Geometry EOC
Common Core Algebra 2 EOC
FCAT 2.0 Science
FCAT 2.0 Science
Florida Biology 1 EOC
Florida Biology 1 EOC
Florida US History EOC
Florida US History EOC
Florida
Civics EOC
23
Florida Civics EOC
Goal #1: Create High Quality Assessments
•
•
•
•
24
– Required summative assessment
components
States will have a choice of testing windows to
accommodate district and school needs
Assessments will be given over the course of several
days, with exact numbers and timing still to be
determined
Results will be made available on a similar timeline as
current EOCs and FCAT tests
Test Administration Guidance Document
PARCC Core Commitments, Key Shifts in
the Standards, and the Corresponding
Advances in PARCC
25
PARCC’s Fundamental Advance
PARCC is designed to reward quality
instruction aligned to the Standards, so the
assessment is worthy of preparation rather
than a distraction from good work.
26
PARCC’s Core Commitments to
ELA/Literacy Assessment Quality
27
•
Texts Worth Reading: The assessments will use authentic texts worthy
of study instead of artificially produced or commissioned passages.
•
Questions Worth Answering: Sequences of questions that draw
students into deeper encounters with texts will be the norm (as in an
excellent classroom), rather than sets of random questions of varying
quality.
•
Better Standards Demand Better Questions: Instead of reusing existing
items, PARCC will develop custom items to the Standards.
•
Fidelity to the Standards (now in Teachers’ hands): PARCC evidences are
rooted in the language of the Standards so that expectations remain the
same in both instructional and assessment settings.
What is Different About PARCC’s
Development Process?
• PARCC states first developed the Model Content Frameworks
to provide guidance on key elements of excellent instruction
aligned with the Standards.
• Then, those Frameworks informed the assessment blueprint
design.
So, for the first time. . .
• PARCC is communicating in the same voice to teachers as it is
to assessment developers!
• PARCC is designing the assessments around exactly the same
critical content the standards expect of teachers and
students.
28
What Are the Shifts at the Heart of
PARCC Design (and the Standards)?
1. Complexity: Regular practice with complex text and its
academic language.
2. Evidence: Reading and writing grounded in evidence from
text, literary and informational.
3. Knowledge: Building knowledge through content rich
nonfiction.
29
The CCSS Shifts Build Toward College and
Career Readiness for All Students
Nine Specific Advances in the PARCC
ELA/Literacy Assessment Demanded by the
Three Core Shifts. . .
31
Shift 1: Regular practice with complex
text and its academic language
1. PARCC builds a staircase of text complexity to ensure students are
on track each year for college and career reading.
2. PARCC rewards careful, close reading rather than racing through
passages.
3. PARCC systematically focuses on the words that matter most—not
obscure vocabulary, but the academic language that pervades
complex texts.
32
Shift 2: Reading and writing grounded in
evidence from text, literary and
informational
4. PARCC focuses on students rigorously citing evidence from texts
throughout the assessment (including selected-response items).
5. PARCC includes questions with more than one right answer to
allow students to generate a range of rich insights that are
substantiated by evidence from text(s).
6. PARCC requires writing to sources rather than writing to decontextualized expository prompts.
7. PARCC also includes rigorous expectations for narrative writing,
including accuracy and precision in writing in later grades.
33
Shift 3: Building knowledge through
content rich nonfiction
8. PARCC assesses not just ELA but a full range of reading and writing
across the disciplines of science and social studies.
9. PARCC simulates research on the assessment, including the
comparison and synthesis of ideas across a range of informational
sources.
34
Sample Items Illustrating Some of the
Advances
35
Students’ Command of Evidence with
Complex Texts is at the Core of Every Part
of the Assessment!
SO. . .
Two standards are always in play—whether they be
reading or writing items, selected-response or
constructed-response items on any one of the four
components of PARCC. They are:
– Reading Standard One (Use of Evidence)
– Reading Standard Ten (Complex Texts)
36
Three Innovative Item Types That
Showcase Students’ Command of
Evidence with Complex Texts
• Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR)—Combines a traditional
selected-response question with a second selected-response question
that asks students to show evidence from the text that supports the
answer they provided to the first question. Underscores the importance of
Reading Anchor Standard 1 for implementation of the CCSS.
• Technology-Enhanced Constructed Response (TECR)—Uses technology to
capture student comprehension of texts in authentic ways that have been
difficult to score by machine for large scale assessments (e.g., drag and
drop, cut and paste, shade text, move items to show relationships).
• Range of Prose Constructed Responses (PCR)—Elicits evidence that
students have understood a text or texts they have read and can
communicate that understanding well both in terms of written expression
and knowledge of language and conventions. There are four of these
items of varying types on each annual performance-based assessment.
37
PARCC Summative Assessment
with EBSR, TECR, and PCR Items
38
Sample Items
Sample Items Illustrating Some of the Advances
• Literary Analysis Task Sample Items (Grade 10 )
• Research Simulation Task Sample Items (Grade 7)
• Narrative Writing Task Sample Items (Grade 6)
• End of Year Assessment Sample Items(Grade 3)
39
Literary Analysis Task (Grade 10):
Ovid’s “Daedalus and Icarus” and
Sexton’s “To a Friend Whose Work Has
Come to Triumph”
40
Understanding the Literary Analysis Task
• Students carefully consider two literary texts worthy of close
study.
• They are asked to answer a few EBSR and TECR questions
about each text to demonstrate their ability to do close
analytic reading and to compare and synthesize ideas.
• Students write a literary analysis about the two texts.
41
Texts Worth Reading?
• Range: Example of assessing literature and helping to satisfy the 70%-30%
split of informational text to literature at the high school grade band.
• Quality: The story of Daedalus and Icarus from Ovid's Metamorphoses is a
classic of the genre and has proven to be inspirational to painters and
poets alike, and no poet’s version is more striking than that of Anne
Sexton. Her “To a Friend Whose Work Has Come to Triumph” refashions
the themes of the myth in dramatic fashion, providing a powerful
counterpoint for students to explore.
• Complexity: Quantitatively and qualitatively, the passages have been
validated and deemed suitable for use at grade 10.
42
Questions Worth Answering?
On the following pages, there are two Evidence-Based SelectedResponse Items and one Prose Constructed Response Item that
challenge students’ command of evidence with complex texts.
43
Grade 10 Prose Constructed-Response
Item
Use what you have learned from reading “Daedalus and Icarus” by Ovid and
“To a Friend Whose Work Has Come to Triumph” by Anne Sexton to write an
essay that provides an analysis of how Sexton transforms Daedalus and
Icarus.
As a starting point, you may want to consider what is emphasized, absent, or
different in the two texts, but feel free to develop your own focus for analysis.
Develop your essay by providing textual evidence from both texts. Be sure to
follow the conventions of standard English.
44
Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
• Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RL.10.1 (use of evidence); RI.10.9 (comparison of authors’ presentation); RL.10.10
(complex texts).
– W.10.2 (writing to inform and explain); W.10.4 (writing coherently); W.10.9
(drawing evidence from texts).
– L10.1-3 (grammar and conventions).
• Measures the ability to explain how one text transforms ideas from
another text by focusing on a specific concept presented in the texts (the
transformation of ideas with regard to the experience of flying).
• Asks students to write to sources rather than write to a de-contextualized
prompt.
• Focuses on students’ rigorously citing evidence for their answer.
• Requires students to demonstrate they can apply the knowledge of
language and conventions when writing.
45
Grade 10 Evidence-Based SelectedResponse Item
Part A
Which of the following sentences best states an important theme about human behavior as described in Ovid’s “Daedalus and Icarus”?
a. Striving to achieve one’s dreams is a worthwhile endeavor.
b. The thoughtlessness of youth can have tragic results.*
c. Imagination and creativity bring their own rewards.
d. Everyone should learn from his or her mistakes.
Part B
Select three pieces of evidence from Ovid’s “Daedalus and Icarus” that support the answer to Part A.
a. “and by his playfulness retard the work/his anxious father planned” (lines 310-311)*
b. “But when at last/the father finished it, he poised himself” (lines 312-313)
c. “he fitted on his son the plumed wings/ with trembling hands, while down his withered cheeks/the tears were falling” (lines
327-329)
d. “Proud of his success/the foolish Icarus forsook his guide” (lines 348-349)*
e. “and, bold in vanity, began to soar/rising above his wings to touch the skies” (lines 350-351)*
f. “and as the years went by the gifted youth/began to rival his instructor’s art” (lines 376-377)
g. “Wherefore Daedalus/enraged and envious, sought to slay the youth” (lines 384-385)
h. “The Partridge hides/in shaded places by the leafy trees…for it is mindful of its former fall” (lines 395-396, 399)
46
Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
47
•
Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RL.10.1 (evidence).
– RL.10.2 (theme).
– RL.10.10 (complex text).
•
This item helps students gather information and details for use on the Prose
Constructed Response; it requires close analytical reading to answer both
parts correctly (e.g., Part A of this item is challenging because it requires
synthesis of several parts of the myth to determine the answer).
•
Requires students in Part B to provide evidence for the accuracy of their
answer in Part A.
•
PARCC assessment gives students the opportunity to gain partial credit if their
answers reflect genuine comprehension on their part (e.g., they identify the
theme correctly and are able to identify at least 2 details).
Grade 10 Evidence-Based SelectedResponse Item
Part A
What does the word vanity mean in these lines from the text “Daedalus and Icarus”?
“Proud of his success, the foolish Icarus forsook his guide, and, bold in vanity,
began to soar” (lines 345-349)
a. arrogance*
b. fear
c. heroism
d. enthusiasm
Part B
Which word from the lines from the text in Part A best helps the reader understand
the meaning of vanity?
a. proud*
b. success
c. foolish
d. soar
48
Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
• Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RL.10.1 (use of evidence).
– RL.10.4 (meaning of words and phrases).
– RL.10.10 (complex texts).
• Reflects a key advance, namely focusing on the words that matter most,
not obscure vocabulary, but the academic language that pervades
complex texts.
• Rewards careful, close reading rather than requiring students to race
through the passage to determine the meaning (by using the context of
the text) of an academic word that is important to one of the main
characters and to the central themes. Again, this item helps students
gather details for use on the Prose Constructed Response.
• Credit for Part B (evidence) is given only if Part A is correct, signaling the
importance of the connection between the claim and the evidence.
49
Research Simulation Task (Grade 7):
Amelia Earhart’s Disappearance
50
Understanding the Research Simulation
Task
• Session 1:
– Students begin by reading an anchor text that introduces the topic.
EBSR and TECR items ask students to gather key details about the
passage to support their understanding.
– Then, they write a summary or short analysis of the piece.
• Session 2:
– Students read two additional sources (may include a multimedia text)
and answer a few questions about each text to learn more about the
topic so they are ready to write the final essay and to show their
reading comprehension.
– Finally, students mirror the research process by synthesizing their
understandings into an analytic essay using textual evidence from
several of the sources.
51
Texts Worth Reading?
• Range: Example of assessing reading across the disciplines
and helping to satisfy the 55%-45% split of informational text
to literature at the 6-8 grade band.
• Quality: The texts on Amelia Earhart represent content-rich
nonfiction on a topic that is historically significant.
• Complexity: Quantitatively and qualitatively, the passages
have been validated and deemed suitable for use at grade 7.
52
Questions Worth Answering?
On the following pages there are two Prose Constructed
Response Items and one Technology Enhanced ConstructedResponse Item that challenge students’ command of evidence
with complex texts.
53
Grade 7 Analytical Prose ConstructedResponse Item #1
Based on the information in the text “Biography of Amelia
Earhart,” write an essay that summarizes and explains the
challenges Earhart faced throughout her life. Remember to use
textual evidence to support your ideas.
54
Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
•
Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RI.7.1 (use of evidence); RI.7.2 (summary of text); RI.7.10 (complex texts).
– W.7.2 (writing to explain or inform); W.7.4 (writing coherently); W.7.9 (drawing evidence
from texts).
– L.7.1-3 (grammar and conventions).
•
•
•
•
55
Requires writing to sources rather than to a de-contextualized or generalized
prompt (e.g., asks about a specific aspect of Earhart’s life).
Requires students to draw evidence from the text and cite this evidence
clearly.
Requires students to apply the knowledge of language and conventions when
writing.
Purposely designed to help students gather information for writing the final
analytic essay that asks students to evaluate the arguments made in three
texts about Earhart’s bravery (i.e., her bravery can be expressed as her ability
to face the many challenges).
Final Grade 7 Prose ConstructedResponse Item #2
You have read three texts describing Amelia Earhart. All three include the
claim that Earhart was a brave, courageous person. The three texts are:
• “Biography of Amelia Earhart”
• “Earhart's Final Resting Place Believed Found”
• “Amelia Earhart’s Life and Disappearance”
Consider the argument each author uses to demonstrate Earhart’s bravery.
Write an essay that analyzes the strength of the arguments about Earhart’s
bravery in at least two of the texts. Remember to use textual evidence to
support your ideas.
56
Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
•
Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RI.7.1 (use of evidence); RI.7.8 (evaluate claims in a text); RI.7.9 (comparison of
authors’ presentation); RI.7.10 (complex texts).
– W.7.2 (writing to inform and explain); W.7.4 (writing coherently); W.7.7 (conduct short
research projects); W.7.8 (gather relevant information from multiple sources); W.7.9
(drawing evidence from texts).
– L.7.1-3 (grammar and conventions).
•
•
•
•
•
57
Measures the ability to compare and synthesize ideas across multiple texts and
the ability to analyze the strength of various arguments.
Asks students to write to sources rather than write to a de-contextualized
prompt.
Focuses on students rigorously citing evidence for their answer.
Requires students to delve deeply into multiple texts to gather evidence to
analyze a given claim, simulating the research process.
Requires students to demonstrate they can apply the knowledge of language
and conventions when writing.
Grade 7 Technology-Enhanced
Constructed-Response Item
Below are three claims that one could make based on the article “Earhart’s Final
Resting Place Believed Found.”
Part A
•Highlight the claim that is supported by the most relevant and sufficient facts within
“Earhart’s Final Resting Place Believed Found.”
Part B
•Click on two facts within the article that best provide evidence to support the claim
selected in Part A.
58
Aligns to Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
• Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RI.7.1 (use of evidence).
– RI.7.8 (author’s claims and evidence).
– RI.7.10 (complex texts).
• This item helps students gather information and details for use on the first
and second Prose Constructed Response.
• Requires students to employ reasoning skills, since all of the claims listed
could be made, but only one is supported by the most relevant and
sufficient facts.
• Reflects the key shift of reading closely and weighing evidence by offering
credit for Part B only if Part A is correct.
• Technology enables students to highlight evidence that supports their
understanding.
59
Narrative Task (Grade 6):
Jean Craighead George’s
Excerpt from Julie of the Wolves
60
Understanding the Narrative Writing Task
• Students read one or two brief texts and answer a few
questions to help clarify their understanding of the text(s).
• Students then write either a narrative story or a narrative
description (e.g., writing a historical account of important
figures; detailing a scientific process; describing an account of
events, scenes, or objects).
61
Texts Worth Reading?
• Range: Example of assessing literature and helping to satisfy the
55%-45% split of informational text to literature at the 6-8 gradeband.
• Quality: Julie of the Wolves was a winner of the Newbery Medal in
1973. This text about a young Eskimo girl surviving on her own in
the tundra by communicating with wolves offers a story rich with
characterization and imagery that will appeal to a diverse student
population.
• Complexity: Quantitatively and qualitatively, the passages have
been validated and deemed suitable for use at grade 6.
62
Questions Worth Answering?
On the following pages there is one Evidence-Based SelectedResponse Item, one Technology Enhanced Constructed-Response
Item, and one Prose Constructed Response Item that challenge
students’ command of evidence with complex texts.
63
Grade 6 Prose Constructed-Response
Item
In the passage, the author developed a strong character named
Miyax. Think about Miyax and the details the author used to
create that character. The passage ends with Miyax waiting for
the black wolf to look at her.
Write an original story to continue where the passage ended. In
your story, be sure to use what you have learned about the
character Miyax as you tell what happens to her next.
64
Aligns to the the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
•
65
Specific CCSS alignment to:
–
RL.6.1 (use of evidence); RL.6.3 (describe how characters respond to changes); RL.6.10 (complex
text).
–
W.6.3 (narrative writing); W.6.4 (writing coherently).
–
L.6.1-3 (grammar and conventions).
•
Includes rigorous expectations for narrative writing, including weaving details
from the source text accurately into an original narrative story (students must
draw evidence from the text—character traits and the events of the story—
and apply that understanding to create a story).
•
For students who struggle to create original stories, the source text provides
ideas from which to begin; for those students who readily create imaginative
experiences, the source provides a means to “jump off” and innovate.
•
Focuses on students applying their knowledge of language and conventions
when writing (an expectation for both college and careers).
Grade 6 Evidence-Based SelectedResponse Item #1
Part A
What does the word “regal” mean as it is used in the passage?
a. generous
b. threatening
c. kingly*
d. uninterested
Part B
Which of the phrases from the passage best helps the reader understand the
meaning of “regal?”
a. “wagging their tails as they awoke”
b. “the wolves, who were shy”
c. “their sounds and movements expressed goodwill”
d. “with his head high and his chest out”*
66
Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
• Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RL.6.1 (use of evidence).
– RL.6.4 (meaning of words and phrases).
– RL.6.10 (complex texts).
• Reflects a key shift, namely focusing on the words that matter most, not
obscure vocabulary, but the academic language that pervades complex
texts.
• Rewards careful, close reading rather than requiring the students to race
through the passage to determine the meaning of an academic word by
showing the context within the passage that helped them determine the
meaning of the word.
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Grade 6 Evidence-Based SelectedResponse Item #2
Part A
Based on the passage from Julie of the Wolves, how does Miyax feel about her father?
a. She is angry that he left her alone.
b. She blames him for her difficult childhood.
c. She appreciates him for his knowledge of nature.*
d. She is grateful that he planned out her future.
Part B
Which sentence from the passage best shows Miyax’s feelings for her father?
a. “She had been lost without food for many sleeps on the North Slope of Alaska.”
b. “This could be done she knew, for her father, an Eskimo hunter, had done so.”*
c. “Unfortunately, Miyax’s father never explained to her how he had told the wolf of his
needs.”
d. “And not long afterward he paddled his kayak into the Bering Sea to hunt for seal, and
he never returned.”
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Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
• Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RL.6.1 (use of evidence).
– RL.6.3 (how characters respond).
– RL.6.10 (complex texts).
• Rewards careful, close reading to find specific information and applying
understanding of a text.
• Focuses students on rigorously citing evidence for their answer; students
must provide the context used to establish the accuracy of their answer or
they don’t receive credit for the item.
• Asks students to delve deeply into how the main character is feeling as she
reflects on her predicament, helping students gather information and
details for use on the Prose Constructed Response.
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Grade 6 Technology-Enhanced SelectedResponse Item
Part A
Choose one word that describes Miyax based on evidence from the text. There is more than one correct choice
listed below.
A.
reckless
B.
lively
C.
imaginative*
D.
observant*
E.
impatient
F.
confident
Part B
Find a sentence in the passage with details that support your response to Part A. Click on that sentence and
drag and drop it into the box below.
Part C
Find a second sentence in the passage with details that support your response to Part A. Click on that sentence
and drag and drop it into the box below.
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Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
• Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RL.6.1 (use of evidence).
– RL.6.3 (how characters respond).
– RL.6.10 (complex texts).
• Rather than a single right answer, this item allows students to explore
different solutions and generate varying insights about a multidimensional character, choosing the word they most strongly feel they can
defend.
• The item also insists on students rigorously substantiating their
conclusions/insights about the character of Miyax with two details drawn
from the text, helping students gather information and details for use on
the Prose Constructed Response.
• Technology enables students to “drag and drop” evidence that supports
their understanding.
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End-of-Year Assessment (Grade 3):
“How Animals Live”
72
Understanding the End-of-Year
Assessment
• Students will be given several passages to read closely.
• EBSR and TECR questions will be sequenced in a way that they
will draw students into deeper encounters with the texts and
will result in thorough comprehension of the concepts to
provide models for the regular course of instruction.
• Will draw on higher order skills such as critical reading and
analysis, the comparison and synthesis of ideas within and
across texts, and determining the meaning of words and
phrases in context.
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Texts Worth Reading?
74
•
Range: Follows the requirements in the standards to make use of
informational texts, including history, science, and technical
passages (50% of the points in grades 3-5 are to come from
informational texts).
•
Quality: This is an example of a science passage from a thirdgrade textbook.
•
Complexity: Quantitatively and qualitatively, the passages have
been validated and deemed suitable for use at grade 3.
Questions Worth Answering?
On the following pages there is one Evidence-Based SelectedResponse Item and one Technology Enhanced ConstructedResponse Item that challenge students’ command of evidence
with complex texts.
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Grade 3 Evidence-Based SelectedResponse Item #1
Part A
Part B
What is one main idea of “How
Animals Live?”
Which sentence from the article best
supports the answer to Part A?
a.
b.
Animals need water to live.
c.
There are many ways to sort
different animals.*
d.
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There are many types of
animals on the planet.
Animals begin their life cycles in
different forms.
a. “Animals get oxygen from air or
water.”
b. "Animals can be grouped by their
traits.”*
c. "Worms are invertebrates.”
d. "All animals grow and change over
time.”
e. "Almost all animals need water,
food, oxygen, and shelter to live."
Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
• Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RI.3.1 (evidence).
– RI.3.2 (main idea).
– RI.3.10 (complex text).
• While this is an example of a less complex item—one where
the main idea and details to support it are explicit and readily
found—students must provide evidence for the accuracy of
their answer in Part B, illustrating one of the key shifts: use of
textual evidence.
77
Grade 3 Technology-Enhanced
Constructed-Response Item
Drag the words from the word box into the correct locations on
the graphic to show the life cycle of a butterfly as described in
“How Animals Live.”
Words:
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Pupa
Adult
Egg
Larva
Aligns to the Standards and
Reflects Good Practice
• Specific CCSS alignment to:
– RI.3.1 (use of evidence).
– RI.3.3 (relationship between events).
– RI.3.10 (complex texts).
• Reflects the key shift of building knowledge from informational text:
– students must apply their understanding of the text to complete the graphic.
– requires explicit references to the text as the basis for the answers rather than
simply guessing.
• Whereas traditional items might have asked students to “fill in one blank”
on a graphic (with three steps already provided), this technology
enhanced item allows students to demonstrate understanding of the
entire sequence of the life cycle because none of the steps are ordered for
them.
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Evidence –Centered Design
An argument is made about what we observe students say, do,
or produce (the evidence) in a few particular circumstances (the
tasks or items) to support our inferences (or claims) about what
they know, can do, or have accomplished more generally.
Item Guidelines
80
PARCC Assessment – 3 Types of Claims
• The Master Claim is the overall performance goal for the
PARCC ELA/Literacy Assessment System – students must
demonstrate that they are “on track” for college and career
readiness (CCR)
• Major Claims are designed to elicit sufficient evidence to yield
scale scores for making longitudinal comparisons.
• Sub Claims are designed to elicit additional data in support of
the Major Claims while providing data that must help
educators to focus instruction on key priorities.
81
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Evidence Tables
When an item is designed to measure the reading major claim or
is designed to measure both the reading major claim and a
reading sub claim, the item writer should refer to the
appropriate evidence tables.
Each evidence table contains critical information to help item
developers writing items to align items with claims, standards,
and evidence statements.
ELA Evidence Tables
Writing Evidence Tables
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Evidence Tables
• Review 6-8 Reading and Writing Evidence Tables with your
group.
• Discuss the information contained in the tables.
• How might you use information in the Evidence Tables to plan
instruction, create assignments, and develop assessments
• Review the Extended Rubric for Scoring. How might you apply
all or some of the components of the rubric to writing
assignments you have students complete in your classroom?
84
Task Generation Models
3 Types of Tasks the Performance-Based Assessment
• A. Literary Analysis Task
• B. Research Simulation Task
• C. Narrative Writing Task
• Task Generation Models 3-5
• Task Generation Models 6-8
• Task Generation Models 9-11
85
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Task Generation Models
• Review the Task Generation Models with your group.
• What information is provided?
• How might this information impact instruction, materials, and
assignments in your classroom?
87
Forms Specifications for PBA and EOY
• Review the Form Specifications for grades 6-8.
• Discuss the information included for the PBA and EOY
Assessment.
• How might this information be used to select texts used for
instruction, to create student assignments, and to create
classroom assessments?
Passage Selection Guidelines
• Passage Selection Guidelines

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