Supported Employment: A model that works

Report

What is a learning disability?

Abstract ideas

Transferring learning between
contexts

Day one

A multi-tasking world

The ‘Them and Us’ perspective

The need for a precise fit

Vocational profiling

Employer engagement

Job analysis and job carving

Job coaching

Natural support

Maintenance

Resilience

DWP

ODI

Department of Health

Department of Education

Inclusion

Local Government Association

Beyer S and Robinson C (2009) A Review of the Research Literature
on Supported Employment

Beyer, S., Kaehne, A., Grey, J., Sheppard, K. and Meek, A. (2008)
What works?- Transition to employment for young people with
learning disabilities. Chippenham: Shaw Trust. http://www.shawtrust.org.uk/files/shaw_trust_summary_report.pdf

Beyer, Melling and Kilsby (2012) Supported employment for people
with learning disabilities in the UK: the last 15 years. Tizard Learning
Disability Review, 16, 2, 23-32.

Beyer, S. (2012). The progress towards integrated employment in
the UK. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation

Beyer S and Kilsby M (2011) A Financial Cost: Benefit Analysis of
Kent Supported Employment (A Framework for Analysis)

Beyer, S. Goodere, L. and Kilsby, M. (1996) The Costs and Benefits of
Supported Employment Agencies: Findings from a National Survey.
Employment Service Research Series, No. 37. London: Stationery
Office.

Beyer, S. (2012) The Impact of Agency Organisation and Natural
Support on Supported Employment Outcomes. JVR, Volume 36,
Number 2, 109-119.

Bond, G. R. (2004). Supported employment: Evidence for an
evidence-based practice. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 27, 345359.

Bond, G., Drake, R. and Becker, D. (2008). An update of randomized
controlled trials of evidence-based supported employment, 31(4),
280-290.

Brown, L., Shiraga, B. and Kessler, K. (2006). The quest for ordinary
lives: the integrated post-school vocational functioning of 50
workers with significant disabilities. Research and Practice for
Persons with Severe Disabilities, 31(2):93-121.

Carter, E.W., Austin, D. and Trainor, A. (2011). Factors associated
with the early work experiences of adolescents with severe
disabilities. American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental
Disabilities, 49(4), 233-247.

Cimera, R.E. (2007). The cumulative cost-effectiveness of supported
and sheltered employees with mental retardation. Research and
Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 32(4), 247-252.

Cimera, R.E. (2010). National cost efficiency of supported
employees with intellectual disabilities: 2002-2007. American
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 115, 19-29.

Chesnut, R.M., Carney, N., Maynard, H., Mann, N.C., Patterson, P.
and Helfan, M. (1999). Summary report: evidence for the
effectiveness of rehabilitation for persons with traumatic brain
injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 4(2), 176-188.

Coutts, P. and Riddell, S. (2012) Employers’ Views of Supported
Employment for Disabled People in Scotland. University of
Edinburgh: Centre for Research in Education Inclusion and Diversity.

Daston, M., Riehle, E. and Rutkowski, S. (2012) High School
Transition that Works: Lessons Learned from Project Search.
Baltimore, MD, Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

Drake, R. & Bond G. (2008). The future of supported employment
for persons with severe mental illness. Psychiatric Rehabilitation
Journal 1(4),367-376.

Gidugu, V. and Rogers, E. S. (2012). Review of Employment Services
for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A
Comprehensive Review of the State-of-the-Field from 1996–2011.
Boston: Boston University, Sargent College, Center for Psychiatric
Rehabilitation.

Hart, T., Dijkers, M., Whyte, J., Braden, C., Trott, C. and Fraser, R.
(2010). Vocational interventions and supports following job
placement for persons with traumatic brain injury. Journal of
Vocational Rehabilitation, 32 (3),135-150.

Howlin, P. , Alcock, J. and Burkin, C. (2005). An eight year follow-up
of a specialist supported employment service for high-ability adults
with autism or Asperger’s syndrome. Autism. 9(5), 533–549.

Inge, K., Wehman, P., Strobel, W., Powell, D., and Todd, J. (1998).
Supported employment and assistive technology for persons with
spinal cord injury: Three illustrations of successful work supports.
Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 10, 141-152.

Jahoda, A., Kemp, J., Riddel, S. and Banks, P. (2008). Feelings about
work: a review of the socio-emotional impact of supported
employment on people with intellectual disabilities. Journal of
Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 21(1), 1- 18.

Luecking, R.G. (2009). The way to work: how to facilitate work
experiences for youth in transition. Baltimore, MD, Paul H. Brookes
Publishing Co.

Luecking, R.G. (2011). Connecting employers with people who have
intellectual disabilities. American Journal of Intellectual and
Developmental Disabilities 49(4),261-273.

Mank,D., Cioffi, a. and Yovanoff, P. (2000, December). Direct
Support in Supported Employment and Its Relation to Job
Typicalness, Coworker Involvement, and Employment Outcomes.
Mental Retardation: 38,(6) 506-516.

Mank,D. and Grossi, T.A. (2013 ) Employment: Renewed
Investments. INCLUSION AAIDD, Vol. 1, No. 1, 7–16.

McGaughey, M. and Mank, D. (1999) Empirical evidence of systems
change in supported employment.
http://www.worksupport.com/main/downloads/article4.pdf

Ottomanelli, L., Goetz, L., McGeough, C. , Suris , A., Sippel, J.,
Sinnott, P., et al. (2009). Methods of a multisite randomized clinical
trial of supported employment among veterans with spinal cord
injury. Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, 46(7),
919-30.

Ottomanelli, L. , Goetz, L., Suris, A., McGeough, C., Sinnot, P.,
Toscano, R.,et al. (2012). The effectiveness of supported
employment for veterans with spinal cord injuries: results from a
randomized multi-site study. Archives of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation, 930(5),740–747.

Ann Purvis, Lauren Small, James Lowrey, Danielle Whitehurst,
Malen Davies (February 2012) Project SEARCH Evaluation: Final
Report (Centre for Economic & Social Inclusion) ISBN: 978-1-84947947-9

Schneider J. and Wistow, R. (2003) Users views on supported
employment and social inclusion: A qualitative study of people in
work. British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 31, 166-174.

Symonds, P. and Luecking, R.G. (2013) Open employment in
Australia. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 38(3),215-222.

Wehman, P. (2013). Transition from School to Work: Where are we
and where do we need to go? Career Development for Exceptional
Individuals-35th Anniversary issue, 36(1), 58 – 66.

Wehman, P., Chen, C., Targett, P., West, M., and Cifu, G. (in press,
2013). Transition planning and postsecondary educational
outcomes for youth with TBI. NeuroRehabilitation.

Wehman, P., Inge, K. J., Revell, G., and Brooke, V. A. (2007). Real
Work for Real Pay: Inclusive Employment for People with
Disabilities. Baltimore: Paul Brookes Publishing Co.

Wehman, P., Lau, S., Molinelli, A., Brooke, V., Thompson, K., Moore,
C., et al. (2012). Supported employment for young adults with
autism spectrum disorder: Preliminary data. Research and Practice
for Persons with Severe Disabilities, 37(3), 1-10.

Wehman, P. McDonough, J. , Schall, C., Molinelli, A.and Riehle,E.
(in press). Project SEARCH implementation at high school level for
youth with autism . Teaching Exceptional Children.

Wehman, P., Schall,C., McDonough, J., Kregel, J., Brooke, V.,
Molinelli, A., et al. (2013). Competitive employment for youth with
autism spectrum disorders: Early results from a randomized clinical
trial.

Wistow, R. and Justine Schneider, J. (2007) Employment support
agencies in the UK: current operation and future development
needs. Health and Social Care in the Community (2007) 15 (2), 128–
135.
It has an international evidence base:

Local authority disinvestment

Austerity and a changing economy

The presumption of employability

Commissioning

Quality and performance
http://base-uk.org/knowledge/nationaloccupational-standards

Braiding and connecting funding streams

Personal budgets

Pluss and its goals

Gloucestershire CC and its goals

Why we are presenting together

The move to ‘personalise’
social care

The current direction of travel
(Valuing Employment Now, Right to
Control, Caring for Our Future, Think
Local, Act Personal, Sayce Review)

Personal budgets and employment
Pilots in Plymouth and Teignbridge


Outcomes:
o
Teignbridge – 7 paid jobs at 7k each
o
Plymouth – effective transitions pathway developed
Findings:
o
A fully individualised, intensive programme can produce better
outcomes than traditional employment programmes.
o
The relationship with the individual changes from a “provider /
service user” to “customer / provider” – in other words, the
service is customer led.
o
The use of “Discovery methodology” to fully understand a
customer was central to success.
o
Employers value continuity of support from a single of point
of contact
o
Transparency around services and outputs are very important
when operating in what is a retail environment
o
Building a robust presumption of employability
is crucial with this cohort.
Pluss has used the pilots to build a
core programme of five service
packages based on the principles of
the DoE’s Valuing Employment Now:

Introducing you to work

Getting to know you

You getting a job

Job start and induction

Maintain and monitor
We have also developed a series
of supplementary modules which
include:

Better off in work reviews

Career development planning

Job coaching

Additional monitoring support

Sector specific training

As well as, not instead of, DWP
programmes

Potential links to mainstream
provision

The potential for braiding funding

Austerity and changing economy

Welfare reforms driving people
to work

People who haven’t been expected
to work in the past will need to work
in the future
Population
897,000
Unemployed
10,000
Sickness benefits
18,000
People with Learning Disabilities
3,000
Number known to services
1,800
LD Social Care budget
employment spend
1%

Increased independence via
empowerment

Increased social circles

Decreases risks of being a victim
of hate crime

Improves physical and mental
wellbeing

Improves levels of pride, dignity,
confidence and self-worth

22 people into work = savings of £235k
pa £4-5m over an average lifetime

A young person going into services could
cost up to £2m over their lifetime

Presumption of employability

Employment is discussed early on

Employment services available to
buy with personal budgets

Robust system of support

Clear employment pathway

Strong network of partners

5/6 people spending personal
budgets on employment services
are now in full time employment

100 more people in work related
activities
People with learning disabilities in work
15.00%
10.00%
5.00%
0.00%
2012 = 5.9%
2013 - 12.3%

More services for those with
complex needs

Personal budgets for intensive
employment support packages

Innovatively encourage people
to work

Develop a holistic approach to
employment

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