A Slow Pyrolysis Reactor Utilizing Concentrated Solar Radiation to

Report
Solar Thermal Biomass
Processor
Jeremy R.G. Anderson,
Joshua A. Hoverman, and
Matthew J. Traum, Ph.D.
[email protected]
Engineering A Sustainable Earth
Mechanical Engineering Department,
Milwaukee School of Engineering
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Overview
• Thermal Processing
• Markets
• Benefits
• Progress
• Future Work
• Desired Outcomes
Parabolic Trough
Receiver Tube
(Reactor)
Hopper
Controls
Products
Parabolic Trough
Waste
Biomass
In
Drying
electricity
Torrefaction
Pyrolysis
Syngas
Biochar
300K – 373K 473K – 553K 553K – 873K
800F – 2100F
3900F – 5350F
5350F – 1,1110F
fertilizer
System Parameters
Q  mc  T
Heat
P 
Q
t

mc  T
t
Power
P=16kJ/s=16kW 16m2 Needed
At 15
MJ/kg
Energy cycle per hour
Heat Loss 8 MJ
900
MJ
Solar Receiver
Tube(Reactor)
58 MJ
617 MJ
Syngas
Heat
Biochar
333 MJ
Markets
• Agriculture
• Forestry
• Municipal waste
• Bio-fuel production
Environment
• Renewable energy
• Carbon sequestering process
• Facilitates organic farming
• Improves soil quality
• Reduces run-off pollution
Economics
• Energy products
• Eliminate solid-waste tipping fees
• Reduce fertilizer costs (Biochar)
• Carbon credit sales
• Creates new sustainable jobs
• Retains current jobs
Biomass
Syngas
Biochar
Prototype
Components
Phase II
• FF-MCHP system
(Flexible Fuel Micro Combined Heat and Power)
• Consolidate power generation with hot water and
air services
• Develop a robust and inexpensive disc turbine for
power generation
• Design intuitive turbine controls for optimal
waste heat utilization
• Optimize total system thermal efficiency
Syngas
Methane
Modified
Brayton Cycle
Combustion
Chamber
Disc
Turbine
Comp
ATM
Hot
Water
Gen.
Hot
Air
ATM
Disk Turbine
Components
Nozzle
Rotor
Source: Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Ferenc Lezsovits
Desired Outcomes
• Pilot system for Sweet Water by
May 2013
• Closed loop urban agriculture
• Synergy of multiple technologies
• Proof of concept
Solar Thermal Biomass
Processor
Jeremy R.G. Anderson,
Joshua A. Hoverman, and
Matthew J. Traum, Ph.D.
[email protected]
Engineering A Sustainable Earth
Mechanical Engineering Department,
Milwaukee School of Engineering
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Acknowledgements
• EASE Board of Directors
• Sigma XI
• MSOE Research Team
–Josh Hoverman
–Kyle Pace
–Matt Wesley
References
[1] Steinfeld A, Palumbo R: Solar Thermochemical Process Technology. In: Meyers RA, editor.
Encyclopedia of physical science and technology. New York: Academic Press, ISBN 0-12227410-5, 2001;15:237–56.
[2] Carolan J, Joshi S, Dale B: Technical and Financial Feasibility Analysis of Distributed
Bioprocessing Using Regional Biomass Pre-Processing Centers. J Agric Food Ind Org 2007, 5:129.
[3] Gallagher P, Dikeman M, Fritz J, Wailes E, Gauther W, and Shapouri H: Biomass from Crop
Residues: Cost and Supply Estimates. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Chief
Economist, Office of Energy Policy and New Uses. Agricultural Economic Report No. 819
[4] Kellig R, Brenta G, Stephen J, Norman R, Nelsehmann S: Biochar for Environmental
Management: Science and Technology. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell
University, Ithaca, New York 14853, and School of Materials Science and Engineering,
University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW2251, Australia
[5] Prins M, Ptasinski K, Janssen F: Thermodynamics of Gas-Char Reactions: First and Second Law
Analysis. Chemical Engineering Science 58 (13-16):1003-1011.
[6] Roberts K, Gloy B, Joseph S, Scott N, Lehmann J: Life Cycle Assessment of Biochar Systems:
Estimating the Energetic. Economic and Climate Change Potential, Environmental Science and
Technology 44, 827–833.

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