Sentence Types and Variety

Report
Conventions:
Sentence Types & Variety
"Variety is the very spice of life
that gives it all its flavour."
-William Cowper
The beauty of opening a new box of
crayons is viewing the varied spray of
motley colors. A reader should feel
the same excitement when reading a
piece of writing. Recognizing and
applying the use of sentence variation
is key to enhancing student writing
and adding to its freshness of
expression.
Overview
PART I
• Types of Sentences
– Declarative
– Interrogative
– Imperative
– Exclamatory
PART II
• Variety
– Simple
– Compound
– Complex
– Compound-Complex
PART I
Types of Sentences
Types of Sentences
DECLARATIVE
A declarative sentence makes a statement.
Place a period (.) at the end of declarative
sentences.
Example:
1.) Miriam Colon Founded the Puerto Rican Traveling
Theatre.
2.) Curiosity is the beginning of knowledge.
3.) Lana wondered why the sky looked blue.
Types of Sentences
INTERROGATIVE
An interrogative sentence asks a question. Use a
question mark (?) to signal an interrogative
sentence. Often we begin an interrogative
sentence with special words such as what, who,
when, which, how, why, or where.
Example:
1.) What do you know about glaciers?
2.) Was the game exciting?
3.) How do diamonds form?
Types of Sentences
IMPERATIVE
An imperative sentence states a command. The
person making statement is ordering someone to
do something. Because an imperative sentence is
a form of statement, it uses a period (.).
Example:
1.) John, please close the door. (request)
2.) Do your homework each night. (command)
3.) Stop her! (strong command)
Types of Sentences
EXCLAMATORY
An exclamatory sentence expresses a strong
emotion such as surprise, excitement, or anger.
Use an exclamatory mark (!) at the end of
exclamations.
Example:
1.) What a sight the sunset is!
2.) How thoughtful Tim was to rake the leaves!
3.) Sarah won the VCR!
Types of Sentences
Now You try…
Directions: Add the punctuation to the sentence and then
write whether each sentence is declarative (DEC),
interrogative (INT), imperative (IMP), or exclamatory (EXC).
INT
1.) Will you swim in the Atlantic Ocean__
? _____
2.) Oh no, the waves are too rough this time of
! EXC
year__
_____
. DEC
3.) I will swim in the pool instead__
_____
4.) Put sun block on before you go in the pool__
_____
. IMP
Review: PART I
Question and Answer
1.) What are the four types of sentences?
declarative,
interrogative, imperative, exclamatory
________________________________________
2.) Anexclamatory
__________ sentence expresses a
strong emotion such as surprise,
excitement, or anger.
3.) Andeclarative
__________ sentence makes a
statement.
4.) Aninterrogative
__________ sentence asks a question.
5.) An imperative
__________ sentence states a
command.
Types of Sentences
Student Activity
Directions:
1.) Now take out a sheet of notebook
paper and a pen.
2.) Write two original sentences for each
of the four types.
3.) Make sure to use the word choice
skills practiced in the previous lesson.
(Do not use “dead” words! Use “spicy”
words and “tasty” transitions!)
PART II
Sentence Variety
Sentence Variety
SIMPLE
A simple sentence contains one subject and one
verb. In a simple sentence there may be a
compound subject (more than one noun in the
subject) and/or a compound verb (more than one
verb in the predicate).
Example:
1.) Alfred grabbed his ticket and ran for the train.
2.) We drove in and parked the car in the first space.
Sentence Variety
COMPOUND
A sentence made up of two or more main clauses
that are connected by a coordinate conjunction
(and, but, or, yet, so, for) is called a compound
sentence. A compound sentence contains two
simple sentences.
Example:
1.) Estelle left early, but she arrived home late.
2.) Tim made the salad, and Jan grilled the fish.
Sentence Variety
COMPLEX
A complex sentence is formed when an
independent clause, which can stand alone as a
sentence, is combined with one or more
dependent clauses, which cann0t stand alone.
Example:
1.) You should wait to start the movie until I finish the dishes.
2.) Because both men were considered dangerous, the police
officers immediately handcuffed them.
Sentence Variety
COMPOUND-COMPLEX
A compound sentence has two independent
clauses. A complex sentence has one
independent clause and two or more dependent
clauses. A compound-complex sentence has two
or more independent clauses and one or more
dependent clauses.
Example:
1.) If Betty would like to stay over, we could fix up the guest
room for her, and the noise from the children wouldn’t wake
her in the morning.
2.) Jon cleaned the bathroom, and Dad straightened up the
house before the company came.
Sentence Variety
Now you try…
Directions: Write “S” for simple, “C” for compound, “CX” for
complex, or “CC” for compound-complex.
1.) Donna likes chunky peanut butter, but Rochelle
and Christabel like theirs smooth. _____
C
2.) You should wait to start the movie until I finish
the dishes. _____
CX
3.) Angrily tearing up the letter, Raul threw the
pieces into the fireplace and stirred up the fire.
S
_____
4.) After the school year was over, Jack had time
CC
on his hands, so he started a lawn service. _____
Review: PART II
Question and Answer
1.) What are the four varieties of sentences?
________________________________________________
simple, compound, complex, compound-complex
2.) A _______________ sentence has two or more
compound-complex
independent clauses and one or more dependent
clauses.
3.) A _______________ sentence contains two simple
compound
sentences.
4.) A _______________ sentence contains one subject
simple
and one verb.
5.) A _______________ sentence is formed when an
complex
independent
clause, which can stand alone as a
sentence, is combined with one or more dependent
clauses, which cannot stand alone.
Sentence Variety
Student Activity
Directions:
1.) Now take out a sheet of notebook
paper and a pen.
2.) Write two original sentences for each
of the four varieties.
3.) Make sure to use the word choice
skills practiced in the previous lesson.
(Do not use “dead” words! Use “spicy”
words and “tasty” transitions!)

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