Ch. 4

Report
CS 352: Computer Graphics
Chapter 4:
Geometric Objects
and
Transformations
Chapter 4 - 2
Interactive Computer Graphics
Sensational Solar System Simulator
Chapter 4 - 3
Interactive Computer Graphics
Perspective
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How is it that mathematics can model the
(ideal) world so well?
Chapter 4 - 4
Interactive Computer Graphics
Overview
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Scalars and Vectors
Coordinates and frames
Homogeneous coordinates
Rotation, translation, and scaling
Concatenating transformations
Transformations in Canvas
Projections
A virtual trackball
Chapter 4 - 5
Interactive Computer Graphics
Background: linear algebra
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Quick review of important concepts
Point: location (x, y) or (x, y, z)
Vector: direction and magnitude
<x, y, z>
Chapter 4 - 6
Interactive Computer Graphics
Vectors
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Magnitude of a vector: |v|
^
Direction of a vector, unit vector: v
Affine sum:
P = (1-a) Q + a R
Chapter 4 - 7
Interactive Computer Graphics
Dot Product
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Def: u • v = ux vx + uy vy+ uz vz
u • v = |u| |v| cos θ
Uses:
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Angle between two vectors?
Are two vectors perpendicular?
Do two vectors form
acute or obtuse
angle?
Is a face visible?
(backface culling)
Chapter 4 - 8
Interactive Computer Graphics
Cross Product
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u  v = <uyvz - uzvy, uzvx - uxvz, uxvy - uyvx>
Direction: normal to plane containing u, v
(using right-hand rule in right-handed
coordinate system)
Magnitude: |u||v| sin θ
Uses:
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Angle between vectors?
Face outward normal?
Chapter 4 - 9
Interactive Computer Graphics
Face outward normals
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Why might I need face normals?
How to find the outward normal of a face?
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Assume that vertices are listed in a standard
order when viewed from the outside -- counterclockwise
Cross product of the first two edges is outward
normal vector
Note that first corner must be convex
Chapter 4 - 10
Interactive Computer Graphics
Ouch!
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How can I tell if I have run into a wall?
Walls, motion segments, intersection tests
How to tell if two line segments (p1, p2) and
(p3, p4) intersect?
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Looking from p1 to p2, check that p3 and p4 are
on opposite sides
Looking from p3 to p4, check that p1 and p2 are
on opposite sides
Chapter 4 - 11
Interactive Computer Graphics
Sensational Solar System Simulator
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How do you get the earth to go around the
sun?
How do you get the moon to do that fancy
motion?
Chapter 4 - 12
Interactive Computer Graphics
Coordinate systems and frames
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A graphics program uses many coordinate
systems, e.g. model, world, screen
Frame: origin + basis vectors (axes)
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Need to transform between frames
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Chapter 4 - 13
Interactive Computer Graphics
Transformations
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Changes in coordinate systems usually involve
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Translation
Rotation
Scale
3-D Rotation and scale can be represented as
3x3 matrices, but not translation
We're also interested in a 3-D to 2-D projection
We use 3-D "homogeneous coordinates" with
four components per point
For 2-D, can use homogeneous coords with
three components
Chapter 4 - 14
Interactive Computer Graphics
Homogeneous Coordinates
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A point: (x, y, z, w) where w is a "scale factor"
Converting a 3D point to homogeneous
coordinates: (x, y, z)  (x, y, z, 1)
Transforming back to 3-space: divide by w
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(x, y, z, w)  (x/w, y/w, z/w)
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(3, 2, 1): same as
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Where is the point (3, 2, 1, 0)?
(3, 2, 1, 1) = (6, 4, 2, 2) = (1.5, 1, 0.5, 0.5)
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Point at infinity or "pure direction."
Used for vectors (vs. points)
Chapter 4 - 15
Interactive Computer Graphics
Homogeneous transformations
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Most important reason for using
homogeneous coordinates:
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All affine transformations (line-preserving:
translation, rotation, scale, perspective, skew) can
be represented as a matrix multiplication
You can concatenate several such
transformations by multiplying the matrices
together. Just as fast as a single transform!
Modern graphics cards implement homogeneous
transformations in hardware (or used to)
Chapter 4 - 16
Interactive Computer Graphics
Translation
é x'ù é1
ê ú ê
y'
0
ê ú=ê
êz' ú ê0
ê ú ê
ë1 û ë0
0 0 dx ù é x ù
úê ú
1 0 dy ú ê y ú
0 1 dz ú ê z ú
úê ú
0 0 1 ûë1 û
Chapter 4 - 17
Interactive Computer Graphics
Scaling
é x'ù ésx
ê ú ê
y'
0
ê ú=ê
êz' ú ê 0
ê ú ê
ë1 û ë 0
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0
sy
0
0
0
0
sz
0
0ùé x ù
úê ú
0úê y ú
0úê x ú
úê ú
1û ë1 û
Note that the scaling fixed point is the origin
Chapter 4 - 18
Interactive Computer Graphics
Rotation
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0
1
0 cos

0 sin 

0
0
General rotation: about an
axis v by angle u with
fixed point p
With origin as fixed point,
about x, y, or z-axis:
0
 sin 
cos
0
0
0
0

1
 cos
 0

 sin 

 0
0 sin 
1
0
0 cos
0
0
0
0
0

1
cos
 sin 

 0

 0
 sin 
cos
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

1
Chapter 4 - 19
Interactive Computer Graphics
Rotating about another point
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How can I rotate around another fixed point,
e.g. [1, 2, 3]?
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Translate [1, 2, 3] -> 0, 0, 0 (T)
Rotate (R)
Translate back (T-1)
T-1 R T P = P'
Chapter 4 - 20
Interactive Computer Graphics
Rotating about another axis
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How can I rotate about an arbitrary axis?
Can combine rotations
about z, y, and x:
Rx Ry Rz P = P'
Note that order
matters and angles
can be hard to find
Chapter 4 - 21
Interactive Computer Graphics
Concatenating transformations
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Many transformations can be concatenated
into one matrix for efficiency
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Canvas: transformations concatenate
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Set the transformation to the identity to reset
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Or, push/pop matrices (save/restore state)
Chapter 4 - 22
Interactive Computer Graphics
Example: Orbiting the Sun
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How to make the earth move 5 degrees?
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How to animate a continuous rotation?
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Set appropriate modeling matrix before drawing image
Rotate 5 degrees, then translate
What Canvas code to use?
Every few ms, modify modeling matrix and redisplay
Reset to original and concatenate rotation and translation
How to make it spin on its own axis too?
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rotate, translate, rotate, draw
Chapter 4 - 23
Interactive Computer Graphics
Earth & Moon
solar.cx.save();
solar.cx.rotate(timefrac/365);
solar.cx.translate(250,0);
solar.cx.save();
solar.cx.rotate(timefrac);
// earth around the sun
solar.cx.drawImage(earth, -earth.width/2, –earth.height/2);
solar.cx.restore();
solar.cx.save();
// moon around earth
solar.cx.rotate(timefrac/28);
solar.cx.translate(56, 0);
solar.cx.drawImage(moon, -moon.width/2, -moon.height/2);
solar.cx.restore();
Chapter 4 - 24
Interactive Computer Graphics
Moon River, wider than a mile…
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How to make the moon follow that crazy
path?
Try it…
Chapter 4 - 25
Interactive Computer Graphics
Project 4:
Wonderfully Wiggly Working Widget
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Write a program to animate something that
has moving parts that have moving parts
Use both translation and rotation
It should save/restore state
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Examples:
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Walking robot
Person pedaling a unicycle
Person waving in a moving convertible
Spirograph
Chapter 4 - 26
Interactive Computer Graphics
Accelerometer events
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Many browsers now support the
DeviceOrientation API (W3C draft)
[demo]
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window.ondevicemotion = function(event) {
var accelerationX =
event.accelerationIncludingGravity.x
var accelerationY =
event.accelerationIncludingGravity.y
var accelerationZ =
event.accelerationIncludingGravity.z
}
Chapter 4 - 27
Interactive Computer Graphics
3D: Polgyons and stuff
Chapter 4 - 28
Interactive Computer Graphics
How to display a complex object?
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You don't want to put all those teapot
triangles in your source code…
Chapter 4 - 29
Interactive Computer Graphics
A JSON object format
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Object description with vertex positions and faces
{
"vertices" : [
40,40,40,
60,0,60,
20,0,60,
40,0,20],
"indices" : [
0,1,2,
0,2,3,
0,3,1,
1,3,2]
}
________________________________
x = data.vertices[0];
Chapter 4 - 30
Interactive Computer Graphics
Loading an object via AJAX
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What do you think of this code?
trackball.load = function() {
var objectURL = $('#object1').val();
$.getJSON(objectURL, function(data) {
trackball.loadObject(data);
});
trackball.display();
}
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Remember the first 'A' in AJAX!
Wait for the object to load before displaying it
$.getJSON(objectURL, function(data) {
trackball.loadObject(data);
trackball.display();
});
Chapter 4 - 31
Interactive Computer Graphics
Question
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How to move object into the sphere centered
at the origin with radius 1?
Chapter 4 - 32
Interactive Computer Graphics
Point normalization
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Find min and max values of X, Y, Z
Find center point, Xc, Yc, Zc
Translate center to origin (T)
Scale (S)
P' = S T P
Modeling matrix M = S T
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Note apparent reversed order of matrices
Chapter 4 - 33
Interactive Computer Graphics
Question
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How to draw a 3-D object on a 2-D screen?
Chapter 4 - 34
Interactive Computer Graphics
Orthographic projection
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Zeroing the z coordinate with a matrix
multiplication is easy…
 x  1
 y  0
 
0  0
  
1  0
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0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0  x 



0  y 
0  z 
 
1 1 
Or, just ignore the Z value when drawing
Chapter 4 - 35
Interactive Computer Graphics
Perspective projection
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Can also be done with a single matrix multiply using
homogeneous coordinates
Uses the divide-by-w step
We'll see in next chapter
Chapter 4 - 36
Interactive Computer Graphics
Transformations in the Pipeline
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Three coordinate frames:
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World coordinates (e.g. unit cube)
Eye (projection) coordinates (from viewpoint)
Window coordinates (after projection)
Two transformations convert between them
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Modeling xform * world coords -> eye coords
Projection xform * eye coords -> window coords
Chapter 4 - 37
Interactive Computer Graphics
Transformations in Canvas
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Maintain separate 3-D model and project
matrices
Multiply vertices by these matrices before
drawing polygons
Vertices are transformed as they flow through
the pipeline
Chapter 4 - 38
Interactive Computer Graphics
Transformations 2
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If p is a vertex, pipeline produces Cp (postmultiplication only)
Can concatenate transforms in CTM:
CI
C  T(4, 5, 6)
C  R(45, 1, 2, 3)
C  T(-4, -5, -6)
[C = T-1 S T]
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Note that last transform defined is first
applied
Chapter 4 - 39
Interactive Computer Graphics
Putting it all together
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Load vertices and faces of object.
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Normalize: put them in (-1, 1, -1, 1, -1, 1) cube
Put primitives into a display list
Set up viewing transform to display that cube
Set modeling transform to identity
To spin the object, every 1/60 second do:
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Add 5 degrees to current rotation amount
Set up modeling transform to rotate by current
amount
Chapter 4 - 40
Interactive Computer Graphics
Virtual Trackball
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Imagine a trackball embedded in the screen
If I click on the screen, what point on the
trackball am I touching?
Chapter 4 - 41
Interactive Computer Graphics
Trackball Rotation Axis
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If I move the mouse from p1 to p2, what
rotation does that correspond to?
Chapter 4 - 42
Interactive Computer Graphics
Virtual Trackball Rotations
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Rotation about the axis n = p1 x p2
Fixed point: if you use the [-1, 1] cube, it is
the origin
Angle of rotation: use cross product
|u  v| = |u||v| sin θ
(or use Sylvester's built-in function)
n = p1.cross(p2);
theta = p1.angleFrom(p2);
modelMat = oldModelMat.multiply(1); // restore old
matrix
modelMat = Matrix.Rotation(theta,n).multiply(modelMat);
Chapter 2 - 43
Interactive Computer Graphics
Hidden surface removal
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What's wrong with this picture?
How can we
prevent hidden
surfaces from
being displayed?
Chapter 2 - 44
Interactive Computer Graphics
Hidden surface removal
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How can we prevent hidden surfaces from
being displayed?
Painter's algorithm:
paint from back to front.
How can we do this
by computer, when
polygons come in
arbitrary order?
Chapter 4 - 45
Interactive Computer Graphics
Poor-man's HSR
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Transform points for current viewpoint
Sort back to front by the face's average Z
Does this always work?
Chapter 2 - 46
Interactive Computer Graphics
HSR Example
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Which polygon should be drawn first?
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We'll study other algorithms later
Chapter 4 - 47
Interactive Computer Graphics
A better HSR algorithm
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Depth buffer algorithm
Chapter 4 - 48
Interactive Computer Graphics
Data structures needed
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An array of vertices, oldVertices
An array of normalized vertices,
vertices[n][3], in the [-1, 1] cube
An array for vertices in world coordinates
An array of faces containing vertex indexes,
int faces[n][max_sides]. Use faces[n][0] to
store the number of sides. Set max_sides to
12 or so.
Chapter 4 - 49
Interactive Computer Graphics
Virtual Trackball Program
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Stage 1
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Read in, normalize object
Display with rotation, HSR
Stage 2
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Virtual trackball rotations
Perspective
Lighting/shading

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