Increasing the effectiveness of Student Research in a Biomaterials Course Drexel Engineering Perspectives Dr.

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Increasing the effectiveness of Student Research in a
Biomaterials Course
Drexel Engineering Perspectives
Dr. Elisabeth Papazoglou
Dr. Donald McEachron
Siddharth Gadkari
Chetana Sunkari
Jay Bhatt
Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
Workshop: Measuring the Lifelong Learning Outcome in Terms of Information Literacy Components
Engineering Libraries Division, ASEE 2007
User needs and users’ skills
 To understand what our users want, we must know
 Who our users are
 What their information needs are
 Use Drexel’s Engineering Programs as an example /
case study
 Describe our efforts to meet their needs
 Improve through user feedback
User community

Understanding the user community
 Undergraduate and Graduate Students
(today Drexel educates 17000 students)
 Co-op students
 International students representing several
countries

Awareness of new initiatives helps in projecting
new emerging information needs



Meetings with Department Heads
University Web Sites
Newsletter articles
User community
 Doctoral programs are growing
Number of doctoral students increased by 40% in
the last five years
 Faculty members: As new programs evolve, more
faculty are hired.
 75 new faculty members hired in the last three
years
 So …..more users than ever before….
 What do they want?
 How do they let us know what are they looking
for?
Drexel’s Engineering Programs
 All major engineering disciplines
 Biomedical engineering, Science, and Health
systems
 Interdisciplinary focus is increasing
(Nanotechnology, Biomaterials,
Bionanotechnology, Biomechanics, etc.)
 Undergraduate Research
 Graduate Research
Case Study - Biomaterials
 Course Sequence
 3 Quarters = 2 Semesters
 Challenges
 Interdisciplinary Field
 Diverse Student Background
 Lack of appropriate textbooks
Biomaterials courses –
Biomaterials I – Fall Term
 Prof. Papazoglou teaches the three course
sequence
 60-70 students
 Biomaterials properties
 Various types of materials such as polymers,
hydrogels, ceramics, and glasses
 Controlled Drug Release systems
 Nanotechnology
Biomaterials courses –
Biomaterials I – Fall Term
 Research intensive courses
 Students need to search across a variety of
literature
 Type of literature students need to consult






Handbooks
Encyclopedias
Books at the library
Electronic books
Standards such as those from ASTM or ISO
Scientific Literature
Skills targeted
 Develop basic understanding of various types of
biomaterials, their properties and their biomedical
applications
 Develop awareness of both print and electronic
resources to find information on Biomaterials
 Use library blogs efficiently to successfully find
information needed for assignment questions
 Locate relevant research papers by using a variety of
but appropriate resources
 Find patents and Intellectual Property for biomedical
devices
Biomaterials courses –
Biomaterials I – Fall Term
 Dr. Papazoglou’s email earlier in the Fall term
shows what problem she and her students were
facing
 Problems



Several Students were not familiar with a number of databases
and resources available through the library
Google appeared to be the choice even when the specific property
of a particular material was needed
Some students thought they knew about the resources but what
they knew was only about 20% of what they actually can use
Biomaterials courses –
Biomaterials I – Fall Term
 Information Needed
 Biomaterial Properties – Handbooks.
 Find inventions reported in news
 Lexis/Nexis Academic Universe medical news
 Follow up research on new inventions
(find research papers)
 RSS feeds and alerts from databases
 Use Refworks or Endnote( required to create a
bibliography)
ABET Criteria met by Biomaterials courses

Criterion k (Outcome)


Ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern
engineering tools necessary for engineering
practice
Criterion i (Outcome)

Recognition of the need for, and ability to engage
in, life-long learning

These Outcomes were further mapped into
Performance Criteria
Performance Criteria for Outcome ABET i


(ABET i) Recognition of the need for, and ability
to engage in, life-long learning
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA



Ability to use library and online resources for
research purposes – addressed here directly
Membership and participation in professional
organizations
Ability to identify and take advantage of learning
opportunities – addressed here indirectly
Performance Criteria for Outcome ABET k

(ABET k) Ability to use the techniques, skills, and
modern engineering tools necessary for
engineering practice

PERFORMANCE CRITERION

Ability to use computers and computer software for
analyzing and solving problems – addressed
indirectly
Performance Criterion Rubric relevant to
library resources for Outcome ABET i
Performance
Criterion
Pt
s
Level 4
Level 3
Level 2
Level 1
online resources; Exceeds
Uses library and online
Uses library and online
Is unable to effectively use
minimum requirements for
resources; Meets minumum
resources if directed to do so;
library or online resources;
Ability to use library and
references in classroom papers
requirements for references in
Does not always meet minimum
Seldom meets minimum
online resources for
and projects; Asks questions
classroom papers and projects;
standrads for references in
standrads for references in
research purposes
based upon outside sources
Occassionally asks questions
classroom activities; Seldom
classroom activities; Never
and actively seeks out more
based on outside sources.
asks questions based upon
asks questions based upon
outside resources
outside resources
TOTAL POINTS ()
Regularly uses library and
than minimum required
knowledge
Biomaterials courses –
Biomaterials I – Fall Term
What did we do?
 Library Instruction Session
 Blog web site
- Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering
 Research Guides
 Online tutorials – Ei Compendex, Knovel, RSS feeds,
Refworks
 Consultations
Biomaterials courses – Biomaterials I – Fall Term
Biomaterials courses – Biomaterials I – Fall Term
How students communicated
 Email questions
 Personal visits
 Appointments (consultations)
 Virtual chat using IM
 Instruction during lecture time (classes)
 Informal communication
 Frequently asked by users even while walking on
campus
Biomaterials courses –
Biomaterials II – Winter Term
 Patents and Intellectual property
 Students needed to use what they learned in the Fall
term as well as search for patents
 Cancer nanotechnology as an example
 Group Projects
 Blog site for patents
Biomaterials courses –
Biomaterials II – Winter Term
 Information Needed
List 5 patented technologies for controlled drug
delivery of cancer chemotherapy (last 7 years)
 List any patent on drug delivery based on
nanotechnology for drug delivery of cancer
chemotherapy (last 5).
 Determine uniqueness of each patent
 Find research literature using sources learned
during the Fall term
Biomaterials courses –
Biomaterials III – Spring Term
 a)





List 3 FDA approved devices for artificial valves
b) List 3 FDA approved devices for stents and drug eluting
stents
c) Intellectual property protection for 2 of the artificial valves
d) Intellectual property protection for 2 of the drug eluting
stents
e) Select the valve with the best chance of success – discuss
reasons in detail
f) Select a drug eluting stent with the best chance of success –
discuss in detail
Biomaterials courses – Biomaterials II – Winter Term
Assessment – Objective II
 Familiarity of use of electronic and other library
resources in order to complete an independent
Biomaterials project
At the beginning of the class = 20% of students
At the end of the class = 88% of students
Assessment – Open Question
 Do you feel knowledgeable and comfortable in
transferring what you learned from the
Biomaterials / library use modules to your
research?
 Question was asked at the end of the term:
 62% of students answered – Very Comfortable
 28% of students answered – Comfortable
 10% of students answered – Need more practice
Conclusion
 Interaction between students, faculty and the librarian
promotes increased awareness about the sources of
information.
 Information seekers must utilize the help provided to
take maximum advantage of the library resources.
 Last but not the least, collaboration of the users and
the library personnel would reduce effort and increase
the effectiveness of information search.
 Students have shown increased use of relevant library
resources as evident from their interaction with the
librarians and faculty members
Conclusion
 Continued learning environment is a lifelong skill that
can help the graduating students succeed in the fast,
competitive global environment.
 Drexel has a quarter system. Quarter was just finished
last week.
 Some data evaluation still needs to be done
 Proactive approach for faculty collaboration is
essential
 Faculty members’ Information Literacy awareness is
crucial in order for such collaboration to succeed.
Thank You!
Our contact information:
Dr. Elisabeth Papazoglou
School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University
[email protected]
Dr. Donald McEachron
School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University
[email protected]
Jay Bhatt
W. W. Hagerty Library, Drexel University
[email protected]
Suggestions and recommendations most welcome!

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