Scholarly Communications Workshop January 17-18, 2012. Virginia Tech Libraries Joy Kirchner Scholarly Communications Coordinator University of British Columbia.

Report
Scholarly Communications
Workshop
January 17-18, 2012.
Virginia Tech Libraries
Joy Kirchner
Scholarly Communications Coordinator
University of British Columbia
Introductions
Who I am
Who are you?
Eventually, Steve
looked up. His mother
was nowhere in sight
and this was certainly
no longer the toy
department.
Gary Larson
Workshop Agenda
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction to Scholarly Communication
Economics
Copyright/Author Rights
Open Access/Openness
Engagement and Next Steps
Delving into your Discipline
Faculty Engagement Exercise
Taking Action
Program Plan
Learning Objectives
• Understand and describe scholarly
communication as a system and system
characteristics
• Enumerate new modes and models of scholarly
communication and ways libraries can support
those models
• Be able to select and cite key principles, facts,
and messages relevant to scholarly
communication plans and programs and initiate
appropriate programs or pilot projects from
those
Structured interactive overview of the
scholarly communication system including economics,
copyright, and new models
Foundational base in scholarly communication issues in
order to begin
strategic planning and action
Scholarly Communication is …
Scholarly communications covers a broad range of activities, including the discovery,
collection, organization, evaluation, interpretation and preservation of primary and other
sources of information, and the publication and dissemination of scholarly research.“ Mellon
Foundation, 2008 AnnualReport, 30
The Scholarly Communications System incorporates and expands on the more familiar
concept of scholarly publishing and includes both informal and formal networks used by
scholars to develop ideas, exchange information, build and mine data, certify research,
publish findings, disseminate results, and preserve outputs.
This vast and changing system is central to the academic enterprise. – Lee Van Orsdel
Scholarly communication is an umbrella term used to describe the process of academics,
scholars and researchers sharing and publishing their research findings so that they are available
to the wider academic community (such as university academics) and beyond. - Wikipedia
Scholarly communication—the process used by scholars to share the results of their
research—is fast approaching a crossroads. - Cornell
Scholarly communications is the process by which scholarship is produced, supported,
managed, and communicated, and includes all those involved in supporting the life-cycle of
scholarship. Joy Kirchner University of British Columbia
Reflection Exercise
• What other questions have you heard that
you would add to this list?
• Select one of the questions – or consider
ones of your own or that you’ve heard and brainstorm potential responses to
faculty members or graduate students or
administrators.
• Reflect on how you might prepare yourself
to answer the question in the future.
Why should I care about Open Access? I can get access to everything that I need.
Why doesn’t the Library just stop subscribing to large journal packages?
I don't use or publish in costly journals. My field is more about book publication than journal publication so
how do these changes in scholarly publishing & communication affect me?
Is Open Access publishing serious scholarly publishing? Isn’t it for someone who can’t get published in a
serious journal? I have to publish in the key peer-reviewed journals in my field in order to get tenure.
My scholarly society is thinking about moving their journal to a commercial publisher. Are there other
options?
I just found out that my funding agency requires that I make the results of my research freely available
online. I’ve also heard that some funding agencies require data management plans. What does this mean?
Why should I pay attention to author’s rights? I post my article/book chapter on my website anyway.
Can I use the graph I published in Journal X in a future publication?
What’s the point of an institutional repository?
I want my article to be open access but I really don’t think that the author should have to pay for it. Do you
have any suggestions?
As a Collections Librarian, I am getting increasing demands from our faculty to support institutional
memberships for a number of Open Access collections. My Administrators also want me to support other
new model initiatives like SCOAP3, DOAJ, ArXiv and The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. There is no
room in the budget. What can I do to create a sustainable support model for scholarship?
Why does the library continue to cancel journals that I need in my discipline even when budgets aren’t flat?
What questions do you have?
Introduction to the Scholarly
Communications System
Joy Kirchner
University of British Columbia Library
Scholarly Communications Workshop
Virginia Tech
January 17-18, 2012
Looking through the lens of libraries:
Teaching
Learning
Research
Major participants in the life cycle of
scholarly publishing
researchers
authors
foundations
federal agencies
colleges and universities
scholarly societies
publishers
libraries
taxpaying public
higher education
systems
disciplinary practice
publishing industry
Internet culture
scholarly societies
IP/legal system
research industry
faculty rewards system (p&t)
Iterations in the life cycle of scholarship
Formulation
Registration
Certification
Dissemination
Preservation
Publication (Registration
Creation
and Certification)
Dissemination
Editor
Manuscript & ©
Academic
Library
Publisher
Peer
Reviewers
Reformulation
disruption:
Economic model is
unsustainable
Pressure points
Publication (Registration
Creation
and Certification)
Editor
©
Dissemination
Academic
Library
cost
Publisher
Peer
Reviewers
budget
disruption:
Web
internet
creation
publication
dissemination
reformulation
Scholars are
beginning to exploit
the power of the Web
internet
creation
publication
dissemination
reformulation
ED
LIB
PUB
P-R
What role, then, for
publishers and libraries?
How can we/they add
value in a new system?
Function
Old System
New System
Formulation
Alone or in laboratory with
And…
graduate students and colleagues With colleagues all over the web
Registration
Journal submission
Book publication
Conference presentation
Working paper / Technical Report
And…
Blogs
Disciplinary repositories
Open notebooks
Certification
Publishers through peer review
Universities indirectly through
promotion and tenure
And…
Accuracy/good science review
(PloS One)
Open peer review
Dissemination Libraries
Publishers – journals and
monographs
Scholarly societies thru
publications & conferences
Abstract and Indexing Services
And…
Blogs
Repositories
Google and other web search
engines
Funding agency mandates
Archiving
And…
Collaborations like Portico & Hathi
Trust
Disciplinary and institutional
repositories
Libraries
disruption:
Open Movement
disruption:
Open Movement
•
Open access to scholarship
•
Public access to taxpayer
funded research
•
Social movements toward
sharing and remix
Transform
Goal: Build capacity to
integrate scholarly
communications awareness
and transform our work as
academic librarians
Questions?
Comments?
This work was created by Lee Van Orsdel and modified by Sarah
Shreeves and Joy Kirchner last updated on Dec. 28, 2011.
It is licensed under the Creative Commons AttributionNoncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/

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