Local Government in your Community COUNCIL STRUCTURE • • • • • • Principal Member (Mayor or Chairperson) Councillors (from 6 – 21 depending on size/population of Council) Some Councils are divided.

Report
Local Government
in your
Community
COUNCIL STRUCTURE
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Principal Member (Mayor or Chairperson)
Councillors (from 6 – 21 depending on
size/population of Council)
Some Councils are divided into wards
Elections every 4 years
Elected Council only exercises power as
group
CEO responsible for staff
The Council’s “first
citizen”
 Councils have either a
Mayor or Chairperson
 Mayor - Elected by all
voters
 Chairperson – Elected
by Councillors
 Attends many functions
on behalf of the Council
 Services are voluntary not paid
 Takes control of Council
meetings

MAYOR /
CHAIRPERSON
COUNCILLORS
Councillors represent all people in
the Council (and those in their ward)
 Are elected either by all voters or
those in their ward
 Vote at Council Meetings on policy,
rules and big issues
 Provide leadership and reflect views
of the communities they serve
 Councillors are volunteers - not paid

COUNCIL MEETINGS
Held at least once every month
 Elected members are required to
attend
 The public can attend Council
meetings
 Council meetings are where issues
are discussed and decisions made

COUNCIL
(elected members)
CHIEF EXECUTIVE
OFFICER
Human Services
•Recreation
•Community Services
•Cultural
Development
•Research
Environmental
Service
s
•Planning
•Building/Health
•Operations
•Property & Technical
Services
Corporate
Services
•Technology
•Information Management
•Public Relations
•Human Resources
City Management
•Project Management
•Mayoral Functions
ROLE OF ADMINISTRATION
Serve the public
 Implement Council’s policies and act on
decisions
 Provide roads, footpaths, street cleaning
and lighting, rubbish & recycling
collection, health and building control

SERVICES AND FACILITIES
Playgrounds
 Holiday programs
 Libraries
 Recreation centres,
sporting grounds
and swimming pools
 Roads & footpaths
 Immunisation

Recycling services
 Environmental
management
 Tourism information
 Youth programs
 Home assistance for
aged and disabled

IF THERE WAS NO LOCAL GOVERNMENT
...There would be less
money for many
services
“Such as your local library Less books and magazines,
computer and internet services?”
IF THERE WAS NO LOCAL GOVERNMENT
...There would be no Parks FOR CHILDREN
TO PLAY IN
IF THERE WAS NO LOCAL GOVERNMENT
“Cockroaches
could be in your
food”
...There would be NO FOOD STANDARD
INSPECTIONS
IF THERE WAS NO LOCAL GOVERNMENT
...There would be NO DOG CONTROL
COMMUNITY ISSUES
Councils are concerned with what is happening
in their community. This means taking an
interest in:
 public transport
 development
 schools
 environment
 main roads
 safety and security
 hospitals
 Aboriginal affairs
Councils work closely with State and Federal
Governments.
EVERY COUNCIL IS DIFFERENT
Its community may be young or old
 The area may be new or well-established
 It may be an urban (city) or rural (country)
Council
 The population may be less than 1000 or
more than 100,000

DIFFERENCES MEAN ...
A
developing Council may need to spend
a large amount of their funds on new
roads and services.
 More
established Councils may be able to
provide more community-orientated
services.
HELPING THE COMMUNITY
 Councils
are important in assisting the
activities of community groups in the area
 Councils
sometimes help with:
 funding
 providing facilities
 training
PLAYING YOUR PART
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Contact your Council to find out what’s happening in
your area
If you would like to see different activities in your
area, let Council know
Inform Council whether their programs suit your
needs
Report any graffiti or vandalism to the police, this
costs your family and community thousands of
dollars
Communities can work with their Council to influence
what happens in their area
ELECTIONS

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Held by postal vote every four years in
November
Voting is not compulsory (unlike State and
Federal government elections)
A contest only occurs if there are more
nominations received than vacancies
available
During their term elected members will make
important decisions about your area
ELECTIONS
People over the age of 18 can vote
 Voting is important because elected
members decide the future of the area and
the services that will be provided
 Candidates will often have different views
on what is best for the area
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