MICS Global Update

Report
Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys
Data Interpretation, Further Analysis and
Dissemination Workshop
MICS Global Update
Global household survey programs
Global household survey programs generating
data on children and women have been in
existence since the 1970s
Global household survey programs

Multi-topic, multiple indicator surveys






World Fertility Surveys (1970s to early 1980s)
Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys (1980s)
Demographic and Health Surveys (since 1980s, USAID)
Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (since 1995, UNICEF)
Reproductive Health Surveys (1990s to 2010s, CDC)
MICS and DHS are now the two largest global
survey programs on children and women
Global household survey programs

Thematic (global) surveys






Living Standards Measurement Surveys (WB)
Malaria Indicator Surveys (RBM)
AIDS Indicator Surveys (USAID)
SIMPOC Surveys (ILO)
SMART Surveys (UNICEF et al)
…and others
Regional Programs – PAPFAM (LAS), SILC
(EUROSTAT) and others
Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys

Developed by UNICEF in the 1990s

To assist countries in filling data gaps on children’s
and women’s well-being for tracking progress
toward World Summit for Children Goals, in 1995
and 2000

Nationally representative sample of households

Face to face interviews, observations,
measurements
MICS Since 1995
Round
Year/Period Emphasis
# of Surveys
MICS1
1995
World Summit for Children Goals
60
MICS2
2000
World Summit for Children Goals
65
53
MICS3
2005-09
World Fit For Children Goals, MDGs,
Other Global Monitoring
Frameworks
MICS4
2009-13
MDGs, Other Global Monitoring
Frameworks
60
2012-15
Final MDG Assessment, A Promise
Renewed, Other Global Monitoring
Frameworks, baseline for post 2015
goals/targets
43
MICS5
Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS)
Since 1995, more than 100 countries and around 240 surveys
Notes: Countries with at least one MICS survey
Including sub-national surveys and ongoing MICS4 surveys
281 surveys
including MICS5
MICS4: 2009-2013
MDGs, other globally recommended indicators,
new topics, emerging issues (e.g. ECD, life
satisfaction, adolescents)
 60 surveys, 50 countries

 National: 43 surveys
 Selected zones, populations: 17 surveys

Low and middle/high income countries
 Chad, Mali, Costa Rica, Serbia, Qatar, Argentina

Median sample size: 7800 households
MICS5: 2012-2015
MDGs, globally recommended indicators
 43 surveys, 40 countries

 National: 34 surveys
 Selected zones, populations: 10 surveys
Median sample size expected to increase by
20-25 per cent
 Majority of surveys targeting final MDG
assessment

Timeline for global reporting on MDGs
MICS/Household Surveys
2012
2013
2014
2015
Data compilation and analysis
Until early to late fall 2014
Submission of data for SG’s report
March 2015
SG’s MDG Report launch
September 2015
Year of Fieldwork Completion, MICS5 Surveys
27
9
2013
7
2014
2015
Regional Distribution, MICS5 Surveys
13
8
6
3
Central, East Asia ,
Eastern
Pacific
Europe, CIS
4
4
5
Eastern,
Middle South Asia
Latin
Southern East, North
America,
Africa
Africa
Caribbean
Western,
Central
Africa
Status of MICS5 Surveys
3
SURVEY PROCESS
Report Drafting
5
Analysis
4
Data entry, editing
10
Fieldwork
Pre-test, Listing
Design
Planning
1
9
11
Low, middle and high income countries
 Oman, Mali, Kazakhstan, Serbia
 Emergency or post-emergency settings
 Countries new to MICS (UAE), “returning”
countries (Malawi, Guyana), or countries that
have participated in (almost) all rounds
(Serbia, Cuba)

Regional Workshops

2013
 Survey Design (5)
• Kathmandu (March), Dakar (April), Amman
(April), Managua (May), Dubai (June)
 Data Processing (3)
• Bangkok (June), Dakar (July), Dubai (October)
Regional Workshops

2014
 Survey Design (2)
 Data Processing (1)
and
 Data Interpretation, Further Analysis and
Dissemination (4)
First Results, Impressions





Enhanced technical support and coordination system,
increased sample sizes, increased cost
Improvements in compliance to recommendations,
standard tools and approaches, and data quality
Improvements in length and content of training,
sampling, data processing
Target of releasing results 3-6 months after fieldwork
likely to be met for most surveys
Major bottlenecks: Fast data collection, sampling,
political or governance processes, many surveys
Ongoing methodological work
Development of modules/protocols for
 Rapid water quality testing
 External economic support
 Child disability
 Survey tools
 Tablet assisted interviewing

Data From MICS
Household surveys such as MICS generate
 representative, high quality data
 data on coverage, levels, attitudes and
knowledge
 data for a large number of stratifiers,
disaggregates
all at the same time, within a short period of
time, and at low total cost
Data From MICS
Data for more than 100 indicators which can be
disaggregated by:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
geozones
residence (urban, urban-poor, rural)
gender
education
age
wealth
ethnicity/religion/language
others
• and for combinations of the above
Data From MICS
Over the years, MICS has worked on the development of
many new or improved measurement tools, including





Child discipline
Child labor
Early childhood
development
Hand washing
Children left behind






Birth registration
Post-natal health
Life satisfaction
FGM/C
Fertility
Birth weight
You may have generated data on some of these topics
for the first time!
UNICEF’s Global Databases and MICS
Data sources for most recent national data points
www.childinfo.org
Standard survey tools
Reports
Micro datasets
MICS activities
Thank You

similar documents