Phonemic Awareness Interventions

Report
CLOCK HOUR INFORMATION
No clock hours are offered for tonight’s training
alone.
 If you “saved” your clock hour forms from the 1st
intervention training (at a school building), you
can add tonight’s training.

Make sure to include that training date as well as
tonight’s.
 The total clock hours will be 5
 The fee will be $5

PHONEMIC AWARENESS
INTERVENTIONS
Vocabulary
Makiing Meaning
Strategies
ELI Strategies and
Reading Street
ELI Strategies
Reading Street Vocab Book
Fluency
Making Meaning strategies
Skill Builders
ELI Strategies and
Reading Street
Phonics
6 minute solution
Templates
Phonics for Reading
ELI Strategies and
Reading Street
Syllaboards
Phonemic
Awareness
SIPPS
Road to the Code
Templates
ELI Strategies
Road to the Code
Phonemic Awareness in
young Children
SIPPS Beginning
Template
Reading Intervention Materials Training Matrix
All Staff:
Diagnosing and identifying Reading Problems
Using the Diagnostic Tool/I've Dibeled Now What?
Comprehension
LEARNING TARGETS
I know why phonemic awareness is important.
 I can choose from a menu of material to find
phonemic awareness activities.
 I know which activities promote phonemic
awareness development in children.

WHAT IS PHONEMIC AWARENESS?


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Phonemic Awareness is something you can do in the
dark.
Is a primary indicator of early reading success
Is acquired through a continuum of skills
Needs to be taught explicitly first, then in context
National Reading Panel, 2000 and Snow, et al, 1998
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Helps students understand that spoken language is
made up of separate words, words are made up of
syllables, and words can be broken down into
separate sounds,
Helps students read and spell words,
Helps students grasp how the alphabetic system
works,
Helps students move from sounds to letters
(preparation for phonics instruction).
WHY TEACH PHONEMIC AWARENESS?

Helps children learn to read
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Help children learn to spell
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Facilitates children’s learning of the alphabetic
principle by drawing their attention to the sounds
that are related to individual letters.
HOW DO WE TEACH PHONEMIC
AWARENESS?
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Manipulate phonemes by using the letters of the
alphabet.
Focus on only one or two types of phoneme
manipulation, rather than several types.
Skill learning takes place prior and during reading
instruction.
HOW WE TEACH PHONEMIC AWARENESS
Blending
Segmentation
Rhyming
Phoneme Counting
Phoneme Deletion
What word is this …/sh/ /oe/?
What sounds do you hear
in bus?
What rhymes with cat?
How many sounds are in
the word box?
What is left if the /t/ sound
were taken from cart?
TEMPLATES
JOE TORGESEN, PH.D., DIRECTOR OF THE
FLORIDA CENTER FOR READING RESEARCH
Instruction must be made more powerful for
students at risk for reading difficulties. More
powerful instruction means:

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Clear and more detailed explanations
More systematic instructional sequences
More opportunities for guided practice
More opportunities for error correction and feedback
Working Memory and Automaticity—when you are
working on fluency of any sort, you are laying
structures to improve comprehension!
EFFECTIVE INSTRUCTIONAL
TECHNIQUES
 Unison
choral response
 Signaling
 Pacing
 Monitoring
 Correcting errors and teaching to mastery
All designed to eliminate teacher talk and
increase student response!
TEMPLATES FOCUSING ON PHONEMIC
AWARENESS
Template 5
 Template 6

ROAD TO THE CODE
WHAT IS ROAD TO THE CODE?
Series of activities in 44 lessons
 Can be used with heterogeneous or homogeneous
groups
 Helps students develop the awareness that
spoken words can be segmented into phonemes.
 Teacher judgment determines the pace of the
lessons: if your kids need more time, take more
time.
 Each lesson takes between 15 and 20 minutes.

 Road
to the Code should not
replace your Read Well
instruction.
GETTING STARTED
Review the lessons and read the introduction
 Some lessons don’t include directions. They are
routine at this point, so directions are included in
earlier lessons.
 Each lesson has 3 parts

1.
2.
3.
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Say it and move it
Letter names and letter sounds
Activity to reinforce phonological awareness
If you need to shorten a lesson, leave out steps 2
or 3, but keep Say it and Move it for every
lesson.
Read teacher notes (located on left hand side of
each lesson)
PREPARE MATERIALS BEFORE THE LESSON
Disks, tiles, cubes, blocks, or buttons for say it
and move it
 Puppet (Fix it activities)
 Fishing pole (or stick with string) for Let’s Fish
activity
 Paper bags for Post it Activities
 Letter picture cards (at the back of the book)

OTHER THINGS TO KNOW
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Program uses short vowels
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/a/ as in apple
/i/ as in igloo
/o/ as in octopus
/u/ as in umbrella
/e/ as in edge
Letters between slanted lines tell you it’s the
sound.
 Letters underlined tell you it’s the letter name.
 When you see sentences in bold, it tells you
suggested dialogue with students.

MANIPULATIVES

Teach students how to use manipulatives
Use one finger to move objects
 Store manipulatives on the picture portion of the Say
it and Move it sheet.

ROAD TO THE CODE LESSON
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Model
Say it and move it
 Elkonin cards
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ROAD TO THE CODE LESSON
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Your turn

Say it and move it
/a/
 Am
 It
 Fit
 Lit
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Elkonin cards
PHONEMIC AWARENESS IN
YOUNG CHILDREN
COMPONENTS OF PHONEMIC AWARENESS
IN YOUNG CHILDREN
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This program uses games to promote phonemic
development.
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Listening Games
Rhyming Games
Words and Sentences
Awareness of Syllables
Initial and Final Sounds
Phonemes
Introducing Letters and Spelling
COMPONENTS OF PHONEMIC AWARENESS
IN YOUNG CHILDREN
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Phonemic challenges are presented in gradual step by
step progression.
New challenges building on those previously used
User friendly
Lesson components
Objectives
 Explanations
 Any cautions
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Assessment
In the back
 Will help you identify students with phonological needs
 Assess how students are progressing with the program
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COMPONENTS OF PHONEMIC AWARENESS
IN YOUNG CHILDREN
Common American English Consonants and
Vowels (pg 133)
 Suggested Kindergarten Pacing guide (pg 137)
 Suggested 1st grade Pacing guide (pg 145)
 Calendar to track lessons in the pacing guide
 Bibliography of rhyming stories
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SIPPS BEGINNING
PHONEMIC AWARENESS IN SIPPS
BEGINNING
The essential section in SIPPS that focuses on
Phonemic Awareness is Phoneme Play.
 Phoneme Play is at the beginning of each lesson
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PHONEME PLAY
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Oral Blending of Syllables and Words
Model
 Your Turn “Put them together”

e/raser
 Pa/per
 Black/board
 Win/dow
 Pen/cil
 Class/room
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PHONEME PLAY

Phoneme Recognition
Model
 Your Turn “Say /s/ when you hear /sss/.”

Song
 Mud
 Look
 Mess
 Sick
 Him
 Wet
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EXIT SLIP

Please reflect on tonight’s learning targets as you
fill out the exit slip.
I know why phonemic awareness is important.
 I can choose from a menu of material to find
phonemic awareness activities.
 I know which activities promote phonemic awareness
development in children.


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