Scott Peterson, Director Erik Rudeen, Legislative Manager The Department of Transportation was created to deliver transportation services The department is part of the.

Report
Scott Peterson, Director
Erik Rudeen, Legislative Manager
The Department of Transportation was
created to deliver transportation services
The department is part of the executive
branch delivering services directed by
legislative bodies
The department can only do things
that are specified in law
2
Trunk
Highway
County
State Aid
Highway
Municipal
State Aid
Street
Flexible
Fund
Transit
Assistance
Fund
Article 14 of the
Minnesota
Constitution
specifies the
creation of a trunk
highway system
and dedicated
funding sources
Sec. 2. Trunk
highway system
There is hereby
created a trunk
highway system
which shall be
constructed,
improved and
maintained as public
highways by the
state.
Sec. 6. Trunk
highway system
There is hereby created a
trunk highway fund
which shall be used
solely for the purposes
specified in section 2 of
this article and the
payment of principal and
interest of any bonds
issued under the
authority of section 11.
4
MnDOT
develops
(subject to
Governor’s
approval):
•Policy changes or new programs
•Operating budget (salaries, materials,
supplies, routine maintenance, etc.)
•Capital budget (physical infrastructure)
• Can only spend money specifically
appropriated by the Legislature
• Must be spent for the identified purpose
5
Make laws
(policy)
Enact budgets
(authorize
spending)
Raise revenue
(impose taxes)
6
134 House of
Representatives
members
67 Senate
members
• 72 Republican
•29 Republican
•38 DFL
• 62 DFL
House 90 men,
44 women
Senate 44 men,
23 women
7
Identify
goals
Organize
facts—
Identify
department
experts
Identify the
playing field
•Who will support or
oppose?
•What effect will other
issues and political
climate have?
•What can be combined
into one bill?
•What is legislative
path?
• Who would be a good
author?
• Limit committee stops
Develop strategy
Recruit supporters
Lobby opposition legislators and
stakeholders
Identify alternate language and
acceptable compromises
Develop key messages
9
July–August - solicit and
develop legislative
proposals
Biennial session - 2 years
•First year is budget
•Second year is bonding
May – legislature
adjourns
September-January –
governor/MMB approval
October-December –
draft bills
January – legislature convenes
•Committee action
•Floor passage
November-March – talk to
legislators and stakeholders
•Conference committee
10
Bill Introduction
Referral to Committee
Committee Hearing – Bill Passes
•Bill sent to the floor for final action
•Conference Committee
•Governor’s Action
•Bill sent to the floor and referred to
another committee
•Amendments, Engrossments
No Committee Hearing
• Bill remains alive until the
end of the biennium
1st Deadline
All policy committees in one body must act favorably
2nd Deadline
All policy committees in the second body must act favorably
3rd Deadline
Favorable action must be taken by all committees on finance bills
Bills that don’t meet deadlines must go through Rules Committee
It ain’t over ‘til it’s over
11/6/2015
12
Statutes
Session Law
Rules
•permanent laws of the state
•amend statute, or temporary law such as biennial budget
•more specific, govern procedures
Omnibus bills
•large bills that include many different issues
Appropriation
•money allocated by the legislature for a particular purpose
Bonding bills
•authorize the state to sell bonds for buildings, roads or other
infrastructure (3/5 majority)
13
Partisan Staff
Committee Chairs, Legislators
•Committee Administrator
•Legislative Assistant
•Majority and Minority Caucus Researchers
•Committee Page
Non-Partisan Staff
•House Research & Senate Counsel
•Fiscal Analyst
Stakeholders/
Lobbyists
Governor’s Office, MMB, other
agencies
Media
14
Senate
House
Transportation
Policy & Finance
Transportation &
Public Safety
Policy/Finance
•Rep. Tim Kelly
•Sen. Scott Dibble
Capital Investment
Capital
Investment
•Sen. LeRoy Stumpf
•Rep. Paul Torkelson
Finance
Ways & Means
•Rep. Jim Knoblach
15
•Sen. Richard Cohen
POLITICS
•The influences that
citizens attempt to exert
on their government
COMPROMISE
•The orderly conduct of
government as opposed
to revolution by force
•A settlement of
differences in
which each side
makes concessions
16
Preparing for the Hearing
Goal is to ensure
legislators and
others clearly
understand
department’s
position
Identify key
messages
• Use short, basic points
Be prepared and
know the materials
(bill language, fiscal
notes, handouts,
etc.)
Identify possible
questions, develop
answers that circle
back to key
messages
General Rules and Reminders
Arrive 5-10 minutes early, agenda
can change
Mind your body language
Sign in to the committee log
• Usually, wait to be excused from the table
Testifying and Responding to Questions
Never start testimony or
response until
acknowledged by the Chair
State your name and the
organization you represent
Address the Chair and
committee member at the
beginning of each response
Testifying and Responding to Questions
Never make
assumptions about a
question, if unclear ask
for clarification
Stay brief, limit your
response to the question,
rely on prepared
responses and work back
to key messages
If you do not know the
answer, do not speculate.
Indicate you do not
know, but will provide
the information later (if
possible)
Responding to Difficult Questions
Even if the question is hostile, be
respectful. Don’t argue with
legislators
If you have to give an answer that is
not helpful, try to briefly condition it
or provide other helpful information
for context
Generally, do not say the department
“opposes.” Say the department “has
concerns,” offer to work with parties
Not all questions need to be
answered (e.g. rhetorical or highly
political questions)
•Let legislator know about concerns prior to
hearing
•Don’t get in the middle of a political debate
After the Hearing
Do not be frustrated if your
position does not prevail
Compare notes with other
MnDOT staff, and other
interested groups
If legislative liaison is not
there, debrief them later
including any follow-up that
is needed
Follow-up on information
requests as soon as possible
Lobbyists, other agencies
Lack of time
Assumptions/myths/ uncertainty of
effects
Suspicion/fear of large agency
Political climate
23
3,396 House Files introduced
2,992 Senate Files introduced
352 bills passed by the House
334 bills passed by the Senate
313 Chapters of law enacted
24
Alert us to
requests and
contacts from
legislators or staff
• Respond only to questions
for which you are the
department expert
• Do not advocate for a
policy position unless you
are confident it is the
official Administration
position
• Notify Government Affairs
and provide a summary of
the conversation
Submit
legislative
proposals and
bill review forms
Respond quickly
if we ask for
information
25
Legislative Home Page
http://www.leg.state.mn.us/
Legislative Schedules
Bill Introductions and Status
Follow live Committee or Floor Session
Sign up for e-mail notices, publications, Journal and news

similar documents