Mixing math and literacy presentation

Report
Mixing Math and Literacy
Meaningful School Librarian/Math
Teacher Collaboration
Alicia Gillean
School Librarian
Jenks West Intermediate School
Solve this math problem
Die Skala einer Landkarte ist 1 Inch fur je 5
Meilen. Wie Weit wurde der Abstand auf
der Karte sein fur eine gerade Straise, die
20 Milen lang ist? Bitte erklaren Sie.
Thompson, Kersaint, Richards, Hunsader,& Rubenstein, 2008, pg. 10
Relationship between math and
literacy
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Math requires competence with two
languages (Kester, Bardsley, Bach, Gibbs-Brown, 2009)
Many math teachers trained in teaching
only one of the languages
School librarian ideal partner
Every student MLL: Mathematics
Language Learner (Thompson, et.al, 2008)
Multiple Literacies
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Reading
Writing
Speaking
Listening
Viewing
Interpreting representations.
(Thompson, et al., 2008)
Roles of School Librarian in
Math Instruction
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Meaningful integration of math and literacy
Collaboration
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Reading strategies
Vocabulary
Writing
Inquiry-driven projects
Technology
Gathering resources (print and nonprint)
Collaboration: Reading
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“To help our students become independent learners in
our classes and to prepare our students for advanced
study in the future, we need to help them learn the
language of mathematics, including the way the text is
presented in technical text. That is, they need to learn
how to apply their existing reading and interpretation skills
to mathematics language (written and oral), including
attention to the unique characteristics of mathematics
vocabulary and symbols that influence their ability to read
mathematical text with understanding.”
(Thompson et al., 2008, pg. 21)
Challenges faced when reading
math:
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Background information?
Information present?
Missing information?
What is being asked?
Text arrangement?
(Thompson et al., 2008, pg. 53)
Reading Strategies
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Determine what is important
Recognize and repair confusion
Negotiate difficult reading situations
Remember key words used in previous
chapters and use them in subsequent chapters
Figure out unknown vocabulary
Remember what you read
Infer meaning
Tovani, 2004, pg. 31
Strategies for reading math
problems:
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Read slowly and pause often
Read with a pencil in hand for notes, labels,
and diagrams
Use graphic organizers (KWC Chart)
Every word and symbol is important; don’t
skim
(Hyde, 2006; Kester et. al, 2009; Thompson et al., 2008; Tovani, 2004, pg. 31)
Strategies for reading math
problems:
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Think about related problems
Read instructions carefully
Pay attention to the figures and tables
Use pre-reading strategies like:
• Scanning text for unknown words
• Identifying prefixes and roots
Read more than once
(Hyde, 2006; Kester et. al, 2009; Thompson et al., 2008; Tovani, 2004, pg. 31)
Text Features
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Two languages: Mathematical and English
Succinct text: every word important
Definitions
Real World Applications
Historical References
Tables
Graphs and charts
Bold, underlined, italic text
Collaboration: Vocabulary
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Essential for mathematical literacy
Different meanings in math than
traditional English
Must understand math vocabulary to use
it in speech and writing.
Use 30 times before “owning” it
(Thompson et al., 2008)
Vocabulary Instruction Ideas
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Math word wall
Personal dictionary
Modeling while reading math text
Multiple representations chart
Multiple Representations Chart
Mathematical Example
Real-Life Example
Visual Example
Explanation in Words
Collaboration: Inquiry-driven
projects
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“Teaching for mathematical power
requires providing experiences that
stimulate students’ curiosity and build
confidence in investigating, problem
solving, and communication.”
(Zemelman et al.,1998, pg. 89)
Collaboration: Inquiry-driven
projects
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Similar skills for math and information
literacy:
• Problem solving
• Questioning
• Justify answers and solutions (Zelman)
• Draw logical conclusions
• Develop thinking and reasoning skills
(Fleming, 2004 & Zemelman et al., 1998, pg. 105)
Collaboration: Inquiry-driven
projects
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“Students at all grades can listen or read the
arguments of others, decide whether they
make sense, and ask useful questions to
clarify or improve the arguments.”
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“Mathematically proficient students at various
grade levels are able to identify relevant
external mathematical resources, such as
digital content located on a website, and use
them to pose or solve problems”
(Common Core, 2010)
Resources
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Math can be best understood with realworld applications (Fleming, 2004)
Library rich with resources for pictures,
charts, statistics, graphs, etc.
Electronic resources
Resources
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Picture books in math
Poetry in math
• Math Talk: Mathematical ideas in poems for
two voices
Integers
We’re positive
We’re negative
We include zero
We include zero
We’re not fractions
Nor decimals
But whole quantities
But whole quantities
Wrapping it up
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Math and literacy are not mutually
exclusive
Literacy is essential for mathematical
success
School librarians and math teachers can
work together to help students develop
mathematical literacy.
The scale for the map is 1 inch: 5 miles.
How long would the distance on the map
be for a straight road that is 20 miles
long? Please explain.
References
Common Core Standards Initiative (2010). Common Core State
Standards for Mathematics. Retrieved from
http://corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_Math%20Standards.pdf
Fleming, D. (2004) Let me count the ways. School Library Journal,
50(8), 42-44.
Hyde, A. (2006). Comprehending math. Portsmouth, NH:
Heinemann.
Kester Phillips, D.C., Bardsley, M.E., Bach, T., Gibbs-Brown, K.
(2009). “But I teach math!” The journey of middle school
mathematics teachers and literacy coaches learning to integrate
literacy strategies into the math instruction. Education, 129(3),
467-472.
References
Pappas, T. (1991). Math talk: Mathematical ideas in poems for two
voices. San Carlos, CA: Wide World Publishing, 52.
Thompson, D.R., Kersaint, G., Richards, J.C., Hunsader, P.D.,
Rubenstein, R.N. (2008). Mathematical literacy. Portsmouth,
NH: Heinemann.
Tovani, C. (2004). Do I really have to teach reading?. Portland, ME:
Stenhouse.
Zemelman, S., Daniels, H., Hyde, A. (1998). Best practices: New
standards for teaching and learning in America’s schools (2nd
ed). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

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