Health Focus Teacher Training PPT.

Report
NAVIGATING LITERACY
IN HEALTH
Write name on
back of ticket and
place in black
and white bin.
Marikaye Travis
School Instructional Specialist
LEARNING TARGETS
FOR LITERACY AND RIGOR
TODAY WE WILL LEARN how . . .
 to use accountable talk to increase metacognition
AND
 to create a connection among reading, writing, speaking
& listening in our content lessons
. . . BECAUSE we want to provide students with the
tools necessary to think critically, listen attentively,
work collaboratively, and apply information learned.
LITERACY OR ANCHOR STANDARDS
WHAT ARE THE ANCHOR
STANDARDS??
 10
anchor standards
 Same ultimate goal for K-12
(continuum)
How do I read the Anchor
Standards??
CCR= College & Career Readiness
RI = Reading Informational
1 = Anchor Standard #1
Anchor Standards
Grades 6-8
Grades 9-10
Grades 11-12
Key Ideas and Details
CCRRI1: Read closely to
determine what the text says
explicitly and to make logical
inferences from it: cite specific
textual evidence when writing or
speaking to support conclusions
drawn from the text.
CCRRI2: Determine central ideas
or themes of a text and analyze
their development; summarize the
key supporting details and ideas.
CCRRI3: Analyze how and why
individuals, events, and ideas
develop and interact over the
course of a text.
ELACC6-8RH1: Cite specific textual
evidence to support analysis of
primary and secondary sources.
ELACC9-10RH1: Cite specific textual
evidence to support analysis of primary
and secondary sources, attending to such
features as the date and origin of the
information.
ELACC11-12RH1: Cite specific textual
evidence to support analysis of primary
and secondary sources, connecting
insights gained from specific details to
an understanding of the text as a
whole.
ELACC6-8RH2: Determine the central
ideas or information of a primary or
secondary source; provide an
accurate summary of the source
distinct from prior knowledge or
opinions.
ELACC6-8RH3: Identify key steps in a
text’s description of a process
related to history/social studies (e.g.,
how a bill becomes law, how interest
rates are raised or lowered).
ELACC9-10RH2: Determine the central
ideas or information of a primary or
secondary source; provide an accurate
summary of how key events or ideas
develop over the course of the text.
ELACC11-12RH2: Determine the central
ideas or information of a primary or
secondary source; provide an accurate
summary that makes clear the
relationships among the key details and
ideas.
ELACC11-12RH3: Evaluate various
explanations for actions or events and
determine which explanation best
accords with textual evidence,
acknowledging where the text leaves
matters uncertain.
ELACC9-10RH3: Analyze in detail a series of
events described in a text; determine
whether earlier events caused later ones
or simply preceded them.
Craft and Structure
CCRRI4: Interpret words and
phrases as they are used in a text,
including determining technical,
connotative, and figurative
meanings, and analyze how
specific word choices shape
meaning or tone.
CCRRI5: Analyze the structure of
texts, including how specific
sentences, paragraphs, and larger
portions of the text (e.g., a section,
chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to
each other and the whole.
Anchor Standards
ELACC6-8RH4: Determine the
meaning of words and phrases as
they are used in a text, including
vocabulary specific to domains
related to history/social studies.
ELACC9-10RH4: Determine the meaning of
words and phrases as they are used in a
text, including vocabulary describing
political, social, or economic aspects of
history/social science.
ELACC11-12RH4: Determine the
meaning of words and phrases as they
are used in a text, including analyzing
how an author uses and refines the
meaning of a key term over the course
of a text (e.g., how Madison defines
faction in Federalist No. 10).
ELACC6-8RH5: Describe how a text
presents information (e.g.,
sequentially, comparatively,
causally).
ELACC9-10RH5: Analyze how a text uses
structure to emphasize
key points or advance an explanation or
analysis
ELACC11-12RH5: Analyze in detail how
a complex primary source is structured,
including how key sentences,
paragraphs, and larger portions of the
text contribute to the whole.
Grades 6-8
Grades 9-10
Grades 11-12
Craft and Structure
CCRRI6: Assess how point of
view or purpose shapes the
content and style of a text.
ELACC6-8RH6: Identify aspects of a
text that reveal an author’s point of
view or purpose (e.g., loaded
ELACC9-10RH6: Compare the point of view
of two or more authors for how they treat
the same or similar topics, including which
ELACC11-12RH6: Evaluate authors’
differing points of view on the same
historical event or issue by assessing
CCRRI6: Assess how point of
view or purpose shapes the
content and style of a text.
ELACC6-8RH6: Identify aspects of a
text that reveal an author’s point of
view or purpose (e.g., loaded
language, inclusion or avoidance of
particular facts).
CCRRI7: Integrate and evaluate
content presented in diverse
formats and media, including
visually and quantitatively, as well
as in words.*
ELACC6-8RH7: Integrate visual
information (e.g., in charts, graphs,
photographs, videos, or maps) with
other information in print and digital
texts.
ELACC9-10RH7: Integrate quantitative or
technical analysis (e.g., charts, research
data) with qualitative analysis in print or
digital text.
CCRRI8: Delineate and evaluate
the argument and specific claims in
a text, including the validity of the
reasoning as well as the relevance
and sufficiency of the evidence.
CCRRI9: Analyze how two or more
texts address similar themes or
topics in order to build knowledge
or to compare the approaches the
authors take.
ELACC6-8RH8: Distinguish among
fact, opinion, and reasoned
judgment in a text.
ELACC9-10RH8: Assess the extent to which
the reasoning and evidence in a text
support the author’s claims.
ELACC6-8RH9: Analyze the
relationship between a primary and
secondary source on the same topic.
ELACC9-10RH9: Compare and contrast
treatments of the same topic in several
primary and secondary sources.
CCRRI10: Read and comprehend
complex literary and informational
texts independently and
proficiently.
LITCC6-8RHSS10: By the end of grade
8, read and comprehend
history/social studies texts in the
grades 6–8 text complexity band
independently and proficiently.
ELACC9-10RH6: Compare the point of view
of two or more authors for how they treat
the same or similar topics, including which
details they include and emphasize in their
respective accounts.
ELACC11-12RH6: Evaluate authors’
differing points of view on the same
historical event or issue by assessing
the authors’ claims, reasoning, and
evidence.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
ELACC11-12RH7: Integrate and
evaluate multiple sources of
information presented in diverse
formats and media (e.g., visually,
quantitatively, as well as in words) in
order to address a question or solve a
problem.
ELACC11-12RH8: Evaluate an author’s
premises, claims, and evidence by
corroborating or challenging them with
other information.
ELACC11-12RH9: Integrate information
from diverse sources, both primary and
secondary, into a coherent
understanding of an idea or event,
noting discrepancies among sources.
Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
ELACC9-10RH10: By the end of grade 10,
read and comprehend history/social
studies texts in the grades 9–10 text
complexity band independently and
proficiently.
ELACC11-12RH10: By the end of grade
12, read and comprehend
history/ social studies texts in the
grades 11–12 text complexity band
independently and proficiently.
HOW IS THIS RELEVANT TO ME AS A
HEALTH EDUCATOR?
College and Career Readiness
Anchor Standards:
8th = 55% of reading & writing
should be grounded in
informational text
12th = 70% of reading & writing
should be informational
We can reach the
55% if we all
introduce small
chunks of
informational text
in our units.
SO WHAT DOES LITERACY IN HEALTH
LOOK LIKE?
Necessary Routines for
Increasing Rigor
•
•
•
•
•
Asking deeper questions
Reading same text multiple times for
different purposes
Synthesizing multiple pieces of
media/text for insight into different
perspectives
Discussing texts
Writing about the texts
Journal of Adolescent Literacy
WE START WITH METACOGNITION
!
Metacognition is:
“eavesdropping on someone’s thinking”
“thinking about your thinking”
In metacognition =
In rigor
IN OTHER WORDS . . .
Rigor resides in the energy and
attention given to the text, not
in the text itself.
Rigor is STUDENTS thinking
and doing the work.
-Kylene Beers
Notice & Note
A LOOK INSIDE A LESSON:
Taking Sides:
Should energy drinks be
banned?
THE INSTRUCTIONAL FRAMEWORK
Opening/ACTIVATOR
Purpose for viewing:
1. To what audience is Red Bull marketing?
2. What type of messages were being sent to
the audience about the product?
3. Predict what the FDA would say about this
cartoon clip?
Show
me your
answer!
Opening/ACTIVATOR
What do you know about these topics?




List energy drinks currently on
the market
List benefits of consuming
energy drinks
List potential health problems
caused by ingesting too much
caffeine
What do you know about the
FDA?
What’s important??!!!!
MINI LESSON/WORK SESSION:
HOW DO WE TEACH USING COMPLEX TEXT???
•
This thing called Close Reading
Call for close, attentive, and
purposeful reading of disciplinary
texts to
*gain key ideas and details,
*understand the writing craft
and structure, and
*critically evaluate knowledge,
claims, and evidence.
Help students to slow
down and
*notice
*track their thinking
THINKING NOTES
METACOGNITIVE MARKERS ( M & M’S)
E
??
?
!
Text evidence
Something is unclear or
confusing
Raises a Question--possible
discussion point for class
Omg! Great piece of writing, quote,
or idea!
Words I don’t know
Students annotate text
Purpose written
Numbered paragraphs
Circled unknown
words
Underlined and noted
“E” for evidence
that supported
purpose
Wrote comments in
margins to help her
make connections
MINI LESSON:
Close read text from Taking Sides
Purpose:
Should energy drinks be banned?
They read it . . .
but do they get it?
But wait . . .
Are students armed with the
information necessary to be
successful thinkers and readers?
Do they know how to navigate the text?
WHAT IS INVISIBLE TO STUDENTS?




Text structure (layout, sequence of parts)
Organizational patterns
Graphics, charts, captions, diagrams
Title, subtitles, bold words, headings
Pause and Ponder:
What would your students need to
notice in order to successfully
navigate through this text?

But wait . . .
Do students know their purpose for reading?
Looking through a different lens.
METACOGNITION IS . . .
DRIVEN BY SPEAKING
& LISTENING
CCR SPEAKING & LISTENING
WALKING THE STANDARDS
STRAND
Category 1
Comprehension and Collaboration



CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative
discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on
grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their
own clearly.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.2 Analyze the purpose of information presented in
diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and evaluate
the motives (e.g., social, commercial, political) behind its presentation.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.3 Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims,
evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and relevance and sufficiency of the
evidence and identifying when irrelevant evidence is introduced.
Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas



Category 2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.4 Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient
points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid
reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate
volume, and clear pronunciation.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.5 Integrate multimedia and visual displays into
presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add
interest.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks,
demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See
grade 8 Language standards 1 and 3 here for specific expectations.
WE RETAIN:
20%
of what we hear
40%
of what we see and
hear
80%
of what we see,
hear, and do!
• MALCOLM KNOWLES RESEARCH
WORK SESSION:
STUDENTS TALK AND BRAINSTORM
ARGUMENTS
Face
partners – before reading text
Brainstorm four good reasons energy drinks
should NOT be banned.
 Next, list specific examples that show why your
reason is legitimate. (increases rigor)

TEACHER MODELS EXPECTATIONS
FOUR Reasons
Examples
energy drinks
SHOULD be banned
1. Caffeine causes
health issues
Students could develop caffeine toxicity
2. jkfjkldsjflkjlkjjkk
jkfjljflkjdflk
3.
4.
MINI LESSON/WORK SESSION:
Caffeine Jitters: Energy Drink Panic
An opposing viewpoint:
Students briefly talk about
their thinking with FACE
PARTNER
Purpose
Based on the information provided in this text, should energy
drinks be banned? Use relevant text evidence from this article or
the first article to support your claim.
WORK SESSION:
BRAIN STORM ARGUMENTS
Shoulder
partners – after reading text
Brainstorm four good reasons why students
energy drinks should NOT be banned.
 Next, list specific examples that show why your
reason is legitimate (increases rigor).

TEACHER MODELS EXPECTATIONS
FOUR reasons
energy drinks
should NOT be
banned
Examples
1. Research
FDA exaggerated risks by failing to put
them in perspective.
2.
3.
4.
FIND YOUR SHOULDER PARTNER
Locate your shoulder partner and stand next to
him/her
 Partner on right is #1 and Partner on left is #2
 Teacher confirms all are paired
 Partner #1 – argue banning of energy drinks (1 min.)
 Partner #2 – argue consuming energy drinks (1 min.)

MONITORING THE WORK SESSION
WHAT IS THE TEACHER’S ROLE?

Look for patterns of confusion and getting “off
track” (interrupt work session to get everyone on “same
page” when necessary)

Respond briefly to student annotations as you walk
the room
Note when they are writing fantastic questions
 Ask a question to further develop thinking
 Ask students to clarify what they mean


Explain unknown vocabulary (to whole class) only
when absolutely necessary for comprehension of the
text
ACCOUNTABLE TALK PROMPTS
-So far I’ve learned…
 -This made me think of…
 -That didn’t make sense…
 -I think _____will happen
next.
 -I reread that part because…
 -I was confused by…
 -I think the most important
part was…
 -That is interesting because…
 -I wonder why…
 -I just thought of…

-This connects to….
 -Another content this
reminds me of is …..
 -I can relate to this
because….
 -The author included this
to….
 -This section was included
to…
 -Another way to say this
is…
 -I agree with this
completely because…

Moves You Can Use to Argue
When you want to stake a position
 It is my position that…
 I am going to argue that…
When you want to give reasons
 One reason…
 Another reason…
When you want to offer evidence
 An example that shows this is…
 Specifically, a line/part that shows this is…
 In particular, this part…
When you want to be sure you are showing how the evidence proves
your point
 This shows that…
 This means that…
TAKE
A
STAND
“Safety becomes a concern
when students consume
energy drinks.”

Teach s
Accountable Talk leads to . . .
WRITING
WORK SESSION:
Caffeine Jitters: Energy Drink Panic
An opposing viewpoint:
Students briefly talk about
their thinking with FACE
PARTNER
Purpose
Based on the information provided in this text, should energy
drinks be banned? Use relevant text evidence from this article or
the first article to support your claim. Include at least one opposing
argument in your response.
RETURN TO THE ACTIVATOR AND
COLLABORATIVE DISCUSSIONS
Review brainstorming posters
 Review conversation notes from Take a Stand or
Arguing Both Sides with Face/Shoulder Partners


The speaking & listening strategies give students the
opportunity to see/hear different perspectives and
build on ideas.
Constructed Response:
Your observations?
The author of the article presented one side of a debate over
the consumption of energy drinks. Looking at the article on
monster beverages, the Bloomberg News made a valid point.
In Paragraph 3, in support of banning energy drinks, this
particular news group shared statistics of “37 reports
involving Monster energy drinks, including six fatalities, since
2004.” The other side,however, would argue the article also
mentioned in Paragraph 3 that the FDA also received
thousands of such reports about aspirin each year and
hundreds about coffee. Thus, making the argument that
energy drinks alone are not necessarily the cause of death.
Therefore, it could be argued the individual consuming the
product is ultimately responsible to know their health status,
read the product label, and use reasonable judgment about the
volume being consumed at one time or in one day. After all,
moderation is simply the key.
CLOSING/FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT:
Green – What they learned
Yellow –Questions they have or a
new perspective
Red – What stopped their learning
The Spotlight Assessment
CLOSING:
Most
Valuable
Point Time:
1-2 min.
Students must support
with “why”
Time: 1-2 min.
Students write down
everything they can
remember about the
topic/text in a box draw
on paper.
Resource: The Core Six Essential Strategies, Silver, Dewing, Perini
CLOSING

Beach ball toss
STRATEGIES FOR
NAVIGATING LITERACY
Close reading
 Modeling thinking aloud and annotating
 Carousel brainstorming/graffiti activity
 Accountable talk
 Take a Stand
 Turn and Talk/Shoulder & Face Partners
 Grouping using playing cards
 Anchor Chart - Modeling writing expectations
 MVP/Memory Box
 Beach Ball Toss
 Stoplight Assessment

RESEARCH AND BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS

For literacy

I Read It, But I Don’t Get It – Cris Tovani


Do I Really Have To Teach Reading? - Cris Tovani


Simple strategies and ideas for using literacy to increase rigor in all content areas
For Understanding Common Core Standards

Understanding Common Core Standards – John Kendall


Assessment to inform teaching and learning
Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading – Kylene Beers/Robert Probst


Simple reading strategies for all content areas
So What Do They Really Know? – Cris Tovani


Comprehension strategies for adolescent readers
In depth descriptions of the Common Core Standards (for those who need more
explanation of the standards)
For strategies that respond to the demands of the Common Core

The Core Six – Silver, Dewing, Perini

Essential strategies for when you have a grasp of the Common Core Standards and
you are eager to do something with them
Marikaye Travis
School Instructional Specialist
The fireworks
begin today.
Each
diploma is a
lighted
match.
Each one of
you is a fuse.
- Edward Koch

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