File System Implementation

Report
Chapter 11: File System
Implementation
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition,
Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2009
Chapter 11: File System Implementation
 File-System Structure
 File-System Implementation
 Directory Implementation
 Allocation Methods
 Free-Space Management
 Efficiency and Performance
 Recovery
 NFS
 Example: WAFL File System
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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Objectives
 To describe the details of implementing local file systems and directory
structures
 To describe the implementation of remote file systems
 To discuss block allocation and free-block algorithms and trade-offs
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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Layered File System
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File-System Implementation
 Boot control block contains info needed by system to boot OS from that
volume
 Volume control block contains volume details
 Directory structure organizes the files
 Per-file File Control Block (FCB) contains many details about the file
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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A Typical File Control Block
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
11.6
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In-Memory File System Structures
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11.7
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Virtual File Systems
 Virtual File Systems (VFS) provide an object-oriented way of implementing
file systems.
 VFS allows the same system call interface (the API) to be used for different
types of file systems.
 The API is to the VFS interface, rather than any specific type of file system.
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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Schematic View of Virtual File System
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Directory Implementation
 Linear list of file names with pointer to the data blocks.

simple to program

time-consuming to execute
 Hash Table – linear list with hash data structure.

decreases directory search time

collisions – situations where two file names hash to the same location

fixed size
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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Allocation Methods
 An allocation method refers to how disk blocks are allocated for files:
 Contiguous allocation
 Linked allocation
 Indexed allocation
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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Contiguous Allocation of Disk Space
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Linked Allocation
 Each file is a linked list of disk blocks: blocks may be scattered anywhere on
the disk.
block
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
=
pointer
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Linked Allocation
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Linked Allocation (Cont.)

Simple – need only starting address

Free-space management system – no waste of space

No random access
File-allocation table (FAT) – disk-space allocation used by MS-DOS and OS/2.
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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File-Allocation Table
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Indexed Allocation
 Brings all pointers together into the index block
 Logical view
index table
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Example of Indexed Allocation
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Indexed Allocation (Cont.)
 Need index table
 Random access
 Dynamic access without external fragmentation, but have overhead
of index block
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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Free-Space Management
 Bit vector (n blocks)
0 1
2
n-1
bit[i] =

…
0  block[i] free
1  block[i] occupied
Block number calculation
(number of bits per word) *
(number of 0-value words) +
offset of first 1 bit
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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Free-Space Management (Cont.)
 Bit map requires extra space

Example:
block size = 212 bytes
disk size = 230 bytes (1 gigabyte)
n = 230/212 = 218 bits (or 32K bytes)
 Easy to get contiguous files
 Linked list (free list)

Cannot get contiguous space easily

No waste of space
Operating System Concepts – 8th Edition
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Linked Free Space List on Disk
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