sample poster template

Report
Title of Your Project Goes Here!
Lastname, F.N., Otherlastname, F.N., Finallastname, F.N.
ESCI 111, Physical Geology
Chapman University, Orange, CA
Introduction
Results
Here is where the introduction and background will
go. You can resize the font size as needed to fit but this
is a decent size for good viewability. Feel free to
change font types, colors, backgrounds, etc. as you
like; just make sure the contrast is sufficient so all text
can be read easily.
Here
is
where
the
introduction and background will go. You can resize the
font size as needed to fit but this is a decent size for
good viewability. Feel free to change font types, colors,
backgrounds, etc. as you like; just make sure the
contrast is sufficient so all text can be read easily.
Here is where the introduction and background will
go. You can resize the font size as needed to fit but this
is a decent size for good viewability. Feel free to
change font types, colors, backgrounds, etc. as you
like; just make sure the contrast is sufficient so all text
can be read easily.
Here
is
where
the
introduction and background will go. You can resize the
font size as needed to fit but this is a decent size for
good viewability.
Results can be posted here, in two-column format so
as to improve readability. You should actually use figures
and graphs as much as possible and just let the text
explain or clarify the figures. Science is largely and most
succinctly expressed through figures!
Results can be posted here, in two-column format so
as to improve readability. You should actually use figures
and graphs as much as possible and just let the text
explain or clarify the figures. Science is largely and most
succinctly expressed through figures!
Results can be posted here, in two-column format so
as to improve readability. You should actually use figures
and graphs as much as possible and just let the text
explain or clarify the figures. Science is largely and most
succinctly expressed through figures!
This would be a
good location for a
figure, photo, map,
flow chart, or
schematic if you
have one.
Conclusions (continued)
Results can be posted here, in two-column format so
as to improve readability. You should actually use figures
and graphs as much as possible and just let the text
explain or clarify the figures. Science is largely and most
succinctly expressed through figures!
Results can be posted here, in two-column format so
as to improve readability. You should actually use figures
and graphs as much as possible and just let the text
explain or clarify the figures. Science is largely and most
succinctly expressed through figures!
Results can be posted here, in two-column format so
as to improve readability. You should actually use figures
and graphs as much as possible and just let the text
explain or clarify the figures. Science is largely and most
succinctly expressed through figures!
This would be a good
location for a figure,
photo, map, flow
chart, or schematic if
you have one.
Figure 1. Figure captions should go Figure 2. Figure captions should go
below the figures themselves.
below the figures themselves.
Figure 3. Figure captions should go below the figures
themselves.
Figure 4. Figure captions should go below the
figures themselves.
Table 2. Table captions should go above the tables themselves, unlike figure caps.
Hypothesis
Your hypothesis should go here; remember it is a
simple and concise generalization of some scientific
process which you will then proceed to test with your
experiment. Your hypothesis should go here; remember
it is a simple and concise generalization of some
scientific process which you will then proceed to test
with your experiment.
Experimental Method
This is your experimental method as you had it
written up previously, probably revised somewhat to
account for adjustments you may have made along the
way. Bullet points might be useful:
• Here’s what we did first.
• Here’s what we did next.
• Here’s what we did next.
Figures or tables would go here as well to demonstrate
visually your experimental method.
Table 1. Table captions should go above the tables themselves, unlike
figure caps.
Figure 5. Figure captions should go below the figures
themselves.
Results can be posted here, in two-column format so
as to improve readability. You should actually use figures
and graphs as much as possible and just let the text
explain or clarify the figures. Science is largely and most
succinctly expressed through figures!
Results can be posted here, in two-column format so
as to improve readability. You should actually use figures
and graphs as much as possible and just let the text
explain or clarify the figures. Science is largely and most
succinctly expressed through figures!
Results can be posted here, in two-column format so
as to improve readability. You should actually use figures
and graphs as much as possible and just let the text
Conclusions
Your conclusions should not just be a recap of your
results, but rather an attempt to explain your results in the
context of your hypothesis. Provide reasons *why* your
results turned out the way they did (educated guesses are
okay as long as you have evidence/data to back them up),
whether the results agree with the hypothesis, why or why
not, and how you may revise your hypothesis if there are
some discrepancies.
Your conclusions should not just be a recap of your
results, but rather an attempt to explain your results in the
context of your hypothesis. Provide reasons *why* your
Your conclusions should not just be a recap of your
results, but rather an attempt to explain your results in the
context of your hypothesis. Provide reasons *why* your
results turned out the way they did (educated guesses are
okay as long as you have evidence/data to back them up),
whether the results agree with the hypothesis, why or why
not, and how you may revise your hypothesis if there are
some discrepancies.
Your conclusions should not just be a recap of your
results, but rather an attempt to explain your results in the
context of your hypothesis. Provide reasons *why* your
Your conclusions should not just be a recap of
your results, but rather an attempt to explain your
results in the context of your hypothesis. Provide
reasons *why* your results turned out the way they did
(educated guesses are okay as long as you have
evidence/data to back them up), whether the results
agree with the hypothesis, why or why not, and how
you may revise your hypothesis if there are some
discrepancies.
Your conclusions should not just be a recap of your
results, but rather an attempt to explain your results in
the context of your hypothesis. Provide reasons *why*
your results turned out the way they did (educated
guesses are okay as long as you have evidence/data to
back them up), whether the results agree with the
hypothesis, why or why not, and how you may revise
your hypothesis if there are some discrepancies.
Your conclusions should not just be a recap of your
results, but rather an attempt to explain your results in
the context of your hypothesis. Provide reasons *why*
your results turned out the way they did (educated
guesses are okay as long as you have evidence/data to
back them up), whether the results agree with the
hypothesis, why or why not, and how you may revise
your hypothesis if there are some discrepancies.
Future Research
Here you can provide ideas for future experiments
that would test other aspects of your hypothesis, extend
your hypothesis to other locations/conditions to test its
transferability (that is, whether it also holds true in
situations different from those of your experiment), and
possibly some predictions of what sorts of results you
expect based onyour hypothesis, now strengthened by
your experiment. Bullet points may help:
• Here’s an idea for an additional experiment.
• Here’s an idea for an additional experiment.
• Here’s an idea for an additional experiment.
• Here’s an idea for an additional experiment.
Acknowledgements
Make sure to acknowledge any resources/ or
individuals who may have helped you in completing this
experiment.
References (examples below)
1. Banfield, J.F., Welch, S.A., Zhang, H.Z., Ebert, T.T., and Penn, R.L. (2000)
Aggregation-based crystal growth and microstructure development in natural iron
oxyhydroxide biomineralization products. Science 289(5480): 751-754.
2. Waychunas, G.A., Kim, C.S., and Banfield, J.F. (2005) Nanoparticulate oxide
minerals in soils and sediments: unique properties and contaminant scavenging
mechanisms. Journal of Nanoparticle Research 7: 409-433.

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