Why is design so important to safety

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This presentation is based on content presented at the Mines Safety
Roadshow held in October 2013
It is made available for non-commercial use (e.g. toolbox meetings,
OHS discussions) subject to the condition that the PowerPoint file is not
altered without permission from Resources Safety
Supporting resources, such as brochures and posters, are available
from Resources Safety
For resources, information or clarification, please contact:
[email protected]
or visit
www.dmp.wa.gov.au/ResourcesSafety
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Why is design so important to safety?
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What is safety in design?
Safety in design is aimed at preventing injuries and
disease by considering hazards as early as possible in
the planning and design process.
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Design improvements over time
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How big is your window of opportunity?
Concept
selected
Concept
evaluation
Conceptual
design
Final investment
decision (FID)
Front-end
engineering design
(FEED)
Field activities
Detailed
design
Construction
Cost to change
Source: NOPSEMA
Field construct
and install
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Production or
operation
See code of practice
on safe design
Concept
development
Demolition or
relocation
Modification or
expansion
Detailed
design
Safety in
design
life cycle
Maintenance,
refurbishment
and repair
Shop
fabrication /
manufacture
Site
construction
and installation
Production
operation
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What responsibilities do you have?
Mines Safety and Inspection Act 1994, section 14
(1) A person who designs, manufactures, imports or
supplies any plant for use at a mine must, so far as is
practicable –
(a) ensure that the design and construction of the
plant is such that persons who properly install,
maintain or use the plant are not, in doing so,
exposed to hazards
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Reasonably practicable
Quantum of risk
severity and
likelihood of event
Sacrifice in time,
money and trouble
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What are the consequences of poor design?
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Risk of injury or loss of life
Environmental or equipment damage
Loss of income
Low productivity
Higher operating costs
Higher maintenance costs
Reduced asset life
Higher employment and workers’ compensation
expenses
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Hierarchy of control – start at the top
Elimination
• Remove the hazard or hazardous
work practice
Substitution
• Replace the hazard or hazardous
work practice with a less hazardous
one
• Isolate or separate the hazard or
hazardous work practice from
people
Isolation
• Modify tools or equipment to
minimise exposure to hazard
Engineering
Administrative control
PPE
• Modify work practices (e.g.
procedure, training) to minimise
exposure to hazard
• Last resort when other controls not
practicable
What works?
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What is wrong with this?
Access way next to conveyor take-up pulley
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What is wrong with this?
Lifting lug welded to outside of conical bottom
on powder-handling bin
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Standard drawings – lifting lug example
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What is wrong with this?
Bag filling station – flat belt conveyor with roller
bed lead-off conveyor
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What’s wrong with this?
Tyre inflation cage
“Homemade” truck tyre cage modified with additional steel plating
Source: http://www.alberthaviation.com/TireCageVideos.htm
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What is wrong with this?
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Flaws in the design
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Top rail
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Top drive gear
Bottom rail
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Consider not the cost of fixing a problem in the
design stage, but the cost of not fixing a problem
in the design stage!
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