Focus on Student Learning & Growth and Professional Goals

Report
Multiple Measures- Focus on
Student Learning & Growth and
Professional Goals
This Morning’s Learning
Targets:
• I understand the student growth &
professional goal setting process, instrument
and the impact on student learning.
• I can begin to coach teachers through the
student growth & professional goal setting
process
• I can write, implement, and monitor a
SMART goal that is appropriate for
measuring long-term student growth.
• I can write, implement, and monitor a
professional goal that is appropriate for
measuring an educator’s professional growth
MULTIPLE MEASURES FOR
TEACHER & PRINCIPAL
EFFECTIVENESS
Oregon Framework for
Teacher and Administrator
Evaluation and Support
Systems
Professional
Practice
Professional
Responsibilities
All measures are
supported through
artifacts and
evidence.
Student Learning
and Growth
What are the purposes of
Goal Setting?
 Focus on student results
 Explicitly connect teaching and learning
 Improve instructional practices and teacher
performance
 Tool for school improvement
Student Growth &
Professional Goal Setting
Template
Goal Setting Conference
Goal Setting Components
Categories of Evidence for Multiple
Measures
Content
Professional Practice
Context
Professional Practice
Baseline Data
Professional Practice, Student Learning
and Growth
Student Growth Goal Statement
Student Learning and Growth
Professional Growth Goal
Professional Practice, Professional
Responsibilities
Strategies for Improvement
Professional Practice, Professional
Responsibilities
Resources and Support
Professional Practice, Professional
Responsibilities
Student Growth Process
Step 4:
Step 2:
Step 1:
Determine
needs
Create specific
learning goals
based on preassessment
Step 3:
Create and
implement
teaching and
learning
strategies
Monitor
student
progress
through
ongoing
formative
assessment
Step 5:
Determine
whether
students
achieved the
goals
Alignment of Student Growth
Process and Template
Goal Setting Components
Student Growth Process
Baseline Data
Step 1
Student Growth Goal
Statement
Strategies for Improvement
Step 2
Steps 3 & 4
Strategies for Modification
Step 4
Reflection on Results
Step 5
Alignment of Goal Template and
Danielson Domains
Goal Setting Components
Danielson Domain
Student Growth Goal
Statement
Domains 1, 3, 4
Professional Growth Goal
Domains 1, 2, 3, & 4
Content
Domain 1
Context
Domain 1
Baseline Data
Domain 1, 3
Strategies for Improvement
Domains 1, 2, 3, & 4
Resources and Support
Domains 1, 2, 3, & 4
Step 1: Determining Needs
Step 4:
Step 2:
Step 1:
Determine
needs
Create specific
learning goals
based on preassessment
Step 3:
Create and
implement
teaching and
learning
strategies
Monitor
student
progress
through
ongoing
formative
assessment
Step 5:
Determine
whether
students
achieved the
goals
Anna Tate
8th Grade Language Arts Teacher
Pre-Assessment of
Student Ability in Writing
Rubric used for Assessing Students
Audience &
Purpose
Idea
Development
Organization
& Structure
1
2
3
4
The writer may
identify a general
topic but
demonstrates little or
no awareness of
purpose or audience.
The writer identifies a
generalized purpose or
audience but does not maintain
focus on both. Instead, the
writer focuses more on the task
than the actual purpose or
intended audience.
The writer adequately
establishes focus on the
intended audience and
purpose, but may not
consistently maintain this
focus, losing sight of
audience or purpose on
occasion.
The writer establishes and
maintains focus on
audience and purpose and
effectively engages the
audience by providing
relevant background
information.
The writer gives little
or no purposeful
development of
ideas, interpretation,
insight or
clarification. No
examples or details
are provided or
support is irrelevant.
The writer demonstrates
inconsistent development of
ideas often presenting facts
with little insight,
interpretation, or
clarification. The writer
provides minimal or
irrelevant examples and/or
details for support.
The writer develops ideas
with adequate support, and
clarification of the topic
through examples, details,
facts, explanations,
descriptions, or arguments.
The writer consistently
develops ideas with depth and
complexity to provide insight,
support, and clarification of
the topic. The writer
consistently develops ideas
using appropriate and
effective examples, details,
facts, explanations,
descriptions or arguments.
The writer offers
little or no
organizational
structure, placing
ideas in no logical
order. There is little
or no variety in
The writer demonstrates some
attempt at organization, but
often places ideas in an unclear
order that disrupts the natural
flow or cohesion. The writer
occasionally uses varied
sentence structures, these
appear alongside mostly simple
The writer adequately
organizes the writing by
using a logical progression
of ideas that generally
flows from idea to ideas,
though connections
between some ideas are
The writer consistently
organizes the writing by
using a logical progression of
ideas that flows within and
between paragraphs. The
writer consistently uses a
variety of sentence lengths
and structures.
Student
Student 1
Student 2
Student 3
Student 4
Student 5
Student 6
Student 7
Student 8
Student 9
Student 10
Student 11
Student 12
Student 13
Student 14
Student 15
Student 16
Student 17
(no response)
Student 18
Student 19
Student 20
Average
Audience
& Purpose
2
3
1
2
3
3
2
1
3
2
3
3
1
3
3
2
Idea
Development
2
3
1
2
2
2
1
1
3
2
2
3
1
3
2
2
Organization &
Structure
1
4
1
1
2
2
1
1
3
1
2
3
1
4
2
2
0
0
0
3
3
2
2.25
3
3
1
1.95
2
4
1
1.9
Average
1.67
3.33
1
1.67
2.33
2.33
1.33
1
3
1.67
2.33
3
1
3.33
2.33
2
0
2.67
3.33
1.33
Student Performance by
Groups
Audience &
Purpose
Idea
Development
Organization
& Structure
Low Performing
Mid Performing
High Performing
Students
Students
Students
.75
2.54
3.0
.75
2.08
3.0
.75
1.62
4.0
Baseline Data
Baseline Data
· What are the learning
needs of my students?
· What are the assessments
or evidence sources I will
use?
· Attach supporting data.
I worked with the other LA teachers in the district to create a
common assessment using criteria from the writing rubric.
The data from the pre-assessment shows that 4 students
scored very low, 3 scored very high and all areas of writing
are low. I then grouped the students according to their
scores to see that the low performers averaged .75 in all
three areas of the rubric which is significantly lower that the
mid performing group. The high performing group avg. 4.0
on Organization and Structure, but the other two group avg.
below 2.
Step 1: Determining Needs
Step 4:
Step 2:
Step 1:
Determine
needs
Create specific
learning goals
based on preassessment
Step 3:
Create and
implement
teaching and
learning
strategies
Monitor
student
progress
through
ongoing
formative
assessment
Step 5:
Determine
whether
students
achieved the
goals
Step 2: Creating Goals Using
the SMART Process
Step 4:
Step 1:
Determine
needs
Step 2:
Step 3:
Create
specific
learning goals
based on preassessment
Create and
implement
teaching and
learning
strategies
Monitor
student
progress
through
ongoing
formative
assessment
Step 5:
Determine
whether
students
achieved the
goals
SMART Goal Process
S
M
A
R
T
Specific- The goal
addresses student
needs within the
content.
Measurable- An
appropriate
instrument or
measure is selected
to assess the goal.
Appropriate- The
goal is clearly
related to the role
and responsibilities
of the teacher.
Realistic- The goal is
attainable.
Time-bound- The
goal is contained to
a single school
year/course.
The goal is
measurable and
uses an
appropriate
instrument.
The goal is
standards-based
and directly related
to the subject and
students that the
teacher teaches.
The goal is
doable, but
rigorous and
stretches the
outer bounds of
what is
attainable.
The goal is
bound by a
timeline that is
definitive and
allows for
determining
goal attainment.
The goal is
focused on a
specific area of
need.
Anna’s Goal
Student Growth Goal
Statement:
A good goal statement
is one that is…
For the 2012 – 13 school year
students will make measurable
progress in writing- 80% of the
students will score a “3” or better
overall.

Measurable

Appropriate

Realistic

Time-bound

Specific
Anna’s Goal
Student Growth Goal
Statement:
A good goal statement
is one that is…
For the 2012 – 13 school year, 100%
of students will make measurable
progress in writing. Each student will
improve by one performance level in
two or more areas of the rubric
(audience/purpose, idea development,
organization & structure). Furthermore,
80% of the students will score a “3” or
better overall.

Measurable

Appropriate

Realistic

Time-bound

Specific
You need to KNOW
your students in
order to judge the
goal.
Let’s Practice
On your own,
Decide if the goal provided is SMART.
Refer to the SMART Criteria.
Next,
 Share your thinking and rationale.
 Others at your table may have the same goal.
 If it is not SMART, discuss possible adjustments
to meet SMART criteria.
How SMART is this Goal?
P.E. Teacher’s Goal
For the 2013-14 school year:
Curl ups:
•Level 1 students will increase their baseline by 9; Level 2
students by 7; Level 3 students by 4
Mile Run:
•Level 1 students will decrease their baseline by 4 min.; Level 2
students by 2 min.; Level 3 by 1 min.
Reach and stretch:
•Level 1 students will increase their baseline by 7 cm.; Level 2
by 5 cm.; Level 3 by 2 cm.
As measured by the Presidential Fitness Test
How SMART is this Goal?
Science Teacher’s Goal
For the current school year, all of my students
will make measurable progress in each of the
four areas related to scientific investigation
(hypothesis, investigative design, data collection, data analysis).
All students will achieve at the 3 level of
performance on a 4-point rubric in each area.
How SMART is this Goal?
Art Teacher’s Goal
All students will demonstrate measurable
progress in each of the rubric areas
(Elements & Principles, Creativity & Originality,
Craftsmanship/Skill).
At least 50% of students
will score 3 on the 5-point rubric.
Step 2: Creating Goals Using
the SMART Process
Step 4:
Step 1:
Determine
needs
Step 2:
Step 3:
Create
specific
learning goals
based on preassessment
Create and
implement
teaching and
learning
strategies
Monitor
student
progress
through
ongoing
formative
assessment
Step 5:
Determine
whether
students
achieved the
goals
Setting Professional Growth
Goals
Oregon Framework for
Teacher and Administrator
Evaluation and Support
Systems
Professional
Practice
Professional
Responsibilities
All measures are
supported through
artifacts and
evidence.
Student Learning
and Growth
Evaluation and Professional
Growth Cycle
Self Reflection
Summative Evaluation
Formative
Assessment/Mid Year
Review
Goal Setting
Observation/Collection
of Evidence
Self Reflection to Identify Growth
Needs
Using the lens of the Framework for
Teaching, in which domains and
components do you have greatest
need for professional growth?
Completing the Self Reflection
Reflect on each domain and component.
Highlight the indicators that best describe your
current teaching practice in Domain 3.
List the components which represent areas for
growth.
Identity 1 or 2 components as priority areas.
Anna’s Self Reflection
Component:
Self-Assessment:
2A - Creating an Environment of Respect and
Rapport
U
B
P
D
2B - Establishing a Culture for Learning
U
B
P
D
2C - Managing Classroom Procedures
U
B
P
D
2D - Managing Student Behavior
U
B
P
D
2E - Organizing Physical Space
U
B
P
D
3A - Communicating with Students
U
B
P
D
3B - Using Questioning and Discussion
Techniques
U
B
P
D
3C - Engaging Students in Learning
U
B
P
D
3D - Using Assessment in Instruction
U
B
P
D
3E - Demonstrating Flexibility and
Responsiveness
U
B
P
D
Anna’s Priority Focus
Planning &
Preparation
1A
1B
1C
1D
1E
The
Classroom
Environment
2A
2B
2C
2D
2E
Instruction
3A
3B
3C
3D
3E
Professional
Responsibiliti
es
4A
4B
4C
4D
4E
1F
3a and 3c
4F
Using the Priority area(s) identified through self
reflection, write a professional growth goal(s) that
answers:
1. What professional development will help me
accomplish my SLGG?
2. How will achieving my professional growth
goal improve student learning and
engagement?
3. How has my self reflection and assessment
informed this goal?
4. How might I team with colleagues to achieve
my goal?
Initial Collaborative Goal Setting
Conference
Assessment 

Goals



Strategies


How will progress be measured? What assessments are already in
place and how were they developed? If applicable, how will the
assessments be developed? Are the data sources/measures of
student learning, growth, achievement, &/or proficiency/mastery
appropriate for goal?
Are the identified assessments aligned to state, local, or national
association standards?
Do the Student Growth Goals respond to student needs reflected by
the data?
Are the Student Growth Goals aligned to content learning targets?
Do the Student Growth Goals meet the criteria set forth on the
Checklist?
Are identified strategies appropriate to positively impact the student
goals?
How can the supervisor help support you with achieving these goals?
Teacher: Student Learning
Objective (SLO) Template Checklist
Baseline Data
What information is
being used to
inform the creation
of the SLO and
establish the
amount of growth
that should take
place within the
time period?
Context
Which students will
be included in this
SLO? Include
course, grade level,
and number of
students.
Interval of
Instruction
What is the
duration of the
course that the SLO
will cover?
Content
What content will
the SLO target? To
what related
standards is the SLO
aligned?
Student Growth
Goal Statement
Considering all
available data and
content
requirements, what
growth target(s)
can students be
expected to reach?
What assessment(s)
will be used to
measure student
growth for this
SLO?
Professional
Growth Goal
Considering both
student data and
the teacher’s selfreflection on the
Danielson
Framework, what
would be an aligned
professional growth
goal that will
support my
instructional and/or
professional
improvement?
Strategies for
Improvement
How will I help
students attain the
SLO? What specific
actions will lead to
goal attainment?
What strategies will
the teacher
incorporate into
his/her
methodology and
professional
practice?
Collaborate with Principal to
develop Student Growth and
Professional Goals
Based on your self-assessment and
principal’s input, what professional
growth goal(s), activities, resources and
success measures will help you address
your growth need(s)?
Student Growth versus
Professional Growth Goals
Student Growth Goal
Statement:
Professional Growth Goal
Statement
For the 2012 – 13 school
year, 100% of students will
make measureable progress
in writing. Each student will
improve by one performance
level in audience & purpose,
idea development, and
organization & structure.
Furthermore, 80% of the
students will score a “3” or
better overall.
For the 2012 – 13 school year, I will
improve my ELA instruction to increase
student engagement and achievement by
attending and implementing Writer’s
Workshop training, refining
implementation of the standards,
researching and implementing engaging
and rigorous teaching strategies, and
refining my use of formative assessment
to impact daily instruction. These will be
measured through pre/post assessments,
student work samples, interim
assessments, peer and principal
observations and conferences, and selfreflection.
Aligning Professional Goals
with Self Assessment
Targeted Critical Attributes of 3a
•The teacher states clearly, at some point during the lesson, what students
will be learning.
•If the tactic is appropriate, the teacher models the process to be followed in
the task.
•The teacher makes no content errors.
•The teacher’s vocabulary and usage are correct and completely suited to the
lesson
Targeted Critical Attributes of 3c
•Materials and resources support the learning goals and require intellectual
engagement, as appropriate.
Revised Professional Growth Goal
Professional Growth Goal Statement
For the 2012 – 13 school year, I will Increase my skills
by incorporating a Writer’s Workshop instructional
model. I will pay particular attention to model the
writing process, emphasize the learning target and
use my own authentic writing. By the end of the year,
I will model and collect feedback on three lessons
from my grade-level team. I will develop a portfolio of
my own writing that I have revised in front of students.
Student and Professional Growth
Goals
Student Growth Goal
Statement
SMART goal criteria is used to
formulate the goal.
Professional Growth Goal:
·
·
·
·
What professional development
will help me accomplish my SLG?
(D:4)
How will achieving my professional
growth goal improve student
learning and engagement? (D:3)
How has my self-reflection and
assessment on Domains 1-4
informed this goal? (D:4)
How might I team with colleagues
to successfully achieve my goal?
(D:4)
For the 2012 – 13 school year, 100% of students will make
measurable progress in writing. Each student will improve by
one performance level in two or more areas of the rubric
(audience/purpose, idea development, organization &
structure). Furthermore, 80% of the students will score a “3”
or better overall.
For the 2012 – 13 school year, I will Increase my skills by
incorporating a Writer’s Workshop instructional model. I will
pay particular attention to model the writing process,
emphasize the learning target and use my own authentic
writing. By the end of the year, I will model and collect
feedback on three lessons from my grade-level team. I will
develop a portfolio of my own writing that I have revised in
front of students.
Step 3: Creating and
Implementing Strategies
Step 4:
Step 2:
Step 1:
Determine
needs
Create specific
learning goals
based on preassessment
Step 3:
Create and
implement
teaching and
learning
strategies
Monitor
student
progress
through
ongoing
formative
assessment
Step 5:
Determine
whether
students
achieved the
goals
Student Growth vs. Professional
Growth Strategies
•
• Students will use a writer’s
notebook for writing practice,
specifically developing ideas and
focusing on specific audiences for
specific purposes.
•
• Students will analyze
organizational structure of
narrative,
informational/explanatory, and
argumentative writing and apply
to their own writing.
•
• Students will participate in peer
response groups to give/receive
feedback on audience
awareness, purpose, and idea
development.
I will implement strategies
learned during the Writer’s
Workshop training and develop
writing prompts for students to
use in their writer’s notebooks.
I will refine my implementation
of the standards, researching and
implementing engaging and
rigorous teaching strategies that
deepen student understanding of
organizational structures and
uses in their own writing.
I will refine my use of ongoing
formative assessment to impact
daily instruction by teaching
students to lead classroom
discussions and peer reviews. I
will incorporate these in practice.
Strategies for Improvement
Step 4: Monitoring Student
Progress and Making
Adjustments
Step 4:
Step 2:
Step 1:
Determine
needs
Create specific
learning goals
based on preassessment
Step 3:
Create and
implement
teaching and
learning
strategies
Monitor
student
progress
through
ongoing
formative
assessment
Step 5:
Determine
whether
students
achieved the
goals
Monitoring Student Progress
• Monitor both student progress toward goal
attainment AND strategy effectiveness
through formative assessment processes.
• Make adjustments to strategies as needed.
• Meet with evaluator for a mid-year review
So, what data sources will you
use?
Data Source Possibilities
Common
Assessments
Interim
Assessments
District
Assessments
Projects
Products
Student
Performances
Student
Portfolios
Classroom
Assessments
Data Source Possibilities
Common
Assessments
Interim
Assessments
District
Assessments
Projects
Products
Student
Performances
Student
Portfolios
Classroom
Assessments
Anna Tate
8th Grade Language Arts Teacher
Goal Statement:
For the 2012 – 13
school year, 100% of
my students will make
measurable progress
in writing. Each
student will improve by
one performance level
in at least 2 areas;
audience & purpose,
idea development, and
organization &
structure. Furthermore,
80% of the students
will score a “3” or
better overall.
Baseline and Mid-Year Data
25%
50%
Student
Student 1
Student 2
Student 3
Student 4
Student 5
Student 6
Student 7
Student 8
Student 9
Student 10
Student 11
Student 12
Student 13
Student 14
Student 15
Student 16
Student 17
(no response)
Student 18
Student 19
Student 20
Average
Audience
& Purpose
2/3
3/4
1/1
2/3
3/3
3/3
2/3
1/1
3/3
2/3
3/3
3/3
1/1
3/3
3/3
2/2
Idea
Development
2/2
3/4
1/2
2/3
2/3
2/3
1/2
1/2
3/3
2/3
2/3
3/3
1/2
3/4
2/2
2/2
Organization &
Structure
1/3
4/4
1/2
1/3
2/3
2/3
1/2
1/2
3/4
1/3
2/2
3/3
1/2
4/4
2/3
2/3
0/1
0/1
0/1
3/3
3/3
2/3
2.25/2.6
3/3
3/3
1/2
1.95/2.6
2/3
4/4
1/2
1.9/2.8
Average
2.67
4
1.67
3
3
3
2.33
1.67
3.33
3
2.67
3
1.67
3.67
2.67
2.33
1
3
3.33
2.67
Collaborative Mid-Course Review Conversation
Student
Review available data/evidence toward Student Growth Goals progress as
Learning Goals defined in beginning of year or course of study meeting and make necessary
adjustments (e.g., training needs, resources, strategy for attaining goals,
additional data). Note that although strategies for attaining goals may be
adjusted, the Student Growth Goals should remain constant. Mid-course data
must be included; check box to indicate that data is attached. Reflect on the
growth of students thus far, what next steps will be needed to support
students, and what supports you need to assist you in this work.
Professional
Practices
Review any and all communication notes from Formal observation and any
informal observations. Review additional evidence of professional practice.
Reflect: thinking about your self-assessment, how do you think you have
shown improvement? What areas do you still need to grow and what evidence
can you show/provide. What professional practices and decisions in your work
have had the most influence on your ability to support your students and
achieve these results?
Professional
Review all evidence of professional responsibilities. Reflect: thinking about
Responsibilities your self-assessment, how do you think you have shown improvement? What
areas do you still need to grow and what evidence can you show/provide.
What decisions and activities to grow as a professional have had the most
influence on your ability to support your students and achieve these results?
Reflecting on Priority Areas &
Professional Growth Goal
1. What do I want to change about my
instruction that will effectively
impact student learning?
2. What is my personal learning
necessary to make the change?
3. What are the indicators (measures)
of success?
Reflection on Action Plan
Student Progress
Professional Growth Progress
Implement Writer’s Notebook: Students are
writing almost daily in writer’s notebooks using
prompts and free writes. Students self-assess
their entries using the idea development portion
of the rubric. Formative assessment data
shows that students still have a difficult time
developing effective ideas.
Review of students’ writing notebooks and
analysis of on-going assessments indicate
many students are effectively developing
their ideas when prompts are provided.
Several students are still not developing
their ideas thoroughly in free writes.
Peer Response Groups: Students have been
introduced to peer response groups and have
had several opportunities to give and receive
feedback. Students still need to improve their
ability to make effective revisions to their
writing.
Some students demonstrate critical thinking
and inquiry by generating open ended
questions during class discussions. Peer
observation information indicates that many
students still struggle with higher order
thinking, asking only factual questions
during student lead discussions.
Students’ Analysis: With guidance, students
understand characteristics of narrative,
informational/explanatory, and argumentative
writing, but when provided a task for writing,
have trouble applying this understanding.
Students are effectively using graphics
organizer to make their thinking visible
when explaining comparison/contrast and
chronological sequence, but many still
struggle with their analysis of cause &
effect, which results in weak arguments
and explanations.
Anna’s Mid-year
Reflection on Strategies
Goal Strategy
Adjustments to Strategies
Implement writer’s
notebook for student
writing practice.
I will incorporate opportunities for peer response groups to
write collaboratively using writer’s notebook activities,
assessing specifically for idea development using rubric
criteria. I will focus my modeled writing lessons around how
writers create and build on topic ideas.
Implement peer
response groups.
I will model decision-making about suggested revisions as
students provide feedback on my writing samples. I will
provide students more intentional practice making revisions
to their writing and allow them to share those revisions in
peer response groups.
Analyze modes of
writing.
I will model thinking aloud, and ask students to do the same,
to think through characteristics expected for narrative,
informational/explanatory, and argumentative writing.
Incorporate digital
writing opportunities.
I will incorporate opportunities to students to write for specific
audiences and purposes using digital technologies. Students
will collaborate to write, share ideas and will provide and
receive feedback using digital tools.
Supporting Teachers &
Colleagues
 Review Anna’s reflection and
adjustments. Anna has several
ideas for how she might adjust
strategies.
 BUT, what if she was at a loss?
How would you advise teachers to
learn effective strategies to
support their goals?
Step 5:
Determining Goal Attainment
Step 4:
Step 2:
Step 1:
Determine
needs
Create specific
learning goals
based on preassessment
Step 3:
Create and
implement
teaching and
learning
strategies
Monitor
student
progress
through
ongoing
formative
assessment
Step 5:
Determine
whether
students
achieved the
goals
Anna Tate
8th Grade Language Arts Teacher
Goal Statement:
For the 2012 – 13
school year, 100% of
my students will make
measurable progress
in writing. Each
student will improve by
one performance level
in at least 2 areas:
audience & purpose,
idea development, and
organization &
structure. Furthermore,
80% of the students
will score a “3” or
better overall.
80%
Baseline, Mid-Year, End of Year Data
70%
60%
50%
80%
Avg Score 1
Avg Score 2
40%
Avg Score 3
30%
20%
Avg Score 4
25%
50%
10%
0%
Baseline Data
Mid-Year
End of Year
Student
Student 1
Student 2
Student 3
Student 4
Student 5
Student 6
Student 7
Student 8
Student 9
Student 10
Student 11
Student 12
Student 13
Student 14
Student 15
Student 16
Student 17
(no response)
Student 18
Student 19
Student 20
Average
Audience
& Purpose
2/3
3/4
1/2
2/3
3/3
3/3
2/4
1/2
3/3
2/3
3/4
3/3
1/2
3/3
3/3
2/3
Idea
Development
2/3
3/4
1/2
1/3
2/3
2/3
1/3
1/3
3/3
2/3
2/4
3/3
1/2
3/4
2/3
2/3
Organization &
Structure
1/3
4/4
1/3
1/3
2/4
2/3
1/3
1/2
3/4
1/4
2/3
3/3
1/2
4/4
2/3
2/3
0/2
0/2
0/2
3/3
3/3
2/3
2.25/2.95
3/3
3/4
1/4
1.95/3.1
2/3
4/4
1/3
1.9/3.15
Average
3
4
2.33
3
3.33
3
3.33
2.33
3.33
3.33
3.67
3
2
3.67
3
3
2
3
3.67
3.33
End of the Year Reflection
• What worked (i.e., strategies, support, resources,
goal(s), assessment)?
• What did not work? Why?
• What would you do differently? Why?
• How did the Student Learning Goal setting process
impact your professional practice, professional
responsibilities, and/or student learning?
• How do these results impact professional growth or
directed improvement plan targets? What additional
training or learning is needed?
The Post Conference
• End of Year Data
• Reflection on Results
• Connection to Framework for
Teaching
• Professional Growth Plan Implications
Summative Reflection on goal(s)
status and next steps
Based on the results of your original
identified measures of goal attainment,
to what extent did you achieve your
goal(s)?
How will I use these results to support
my professional growth?
Questions?
Thoughts?

similar documents