Writing a Successful T32 Application

Report
NIH Institutional Training Programs:
Preparing a Successful T32 Application
Alison K. Hall, Ph.D.
Deputy Director
Division of Training, Workforce Development and Diversity
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
National Institutes of Health
June 28, 2013
PhD Training Continues to Evolve
NIH has supported research training since 1930s
fellowships thru the 1950s
National Research Service Award 1975
(i.e. T32, F30/31, F32; MARC)
Ruth L. Kirschstein
-funding to scientists, not health professionals
-to enhance research training
-in scientific areas with need for researchers
-good curricula, facilities, program in add’n to research
-dedication to developing talent
2
NIH Regional Seminar June 28, 2013
PhD support is largely on research grants
Consider differences in apprenticeship vs a program
Source: Graduate Student Survey, NSF
3
Training In light of Multiple Career Outcomes
Employment of Biomedical Science PhDs by Sector
Number
140,000
120,000
Other
Government
100,000
Industrial
All Academic
80,000
60,000
40,000
20,000
-
1973 1977 1981 1985 1989 1991 1993 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2006 2008
NEW
Source: http://sestat.nsf.gov/
4
Training in light of limited diversity in workforce
Biomedical Workforce
US Population
100%
100%
90%
90%
80%
80%
70%
70%
60%
60%
50%
50%
40%
40%
30%
30%
20%
20%
10%
10%
0%
0%
2008
2050
Source: US Census; NSF, 2007
5
Temp. Res.
non-URM
URM
Snapshot of the PhD Biomedical Workforce
http://acd.od.nih.gov/Biomedical_research_wgreport.pdf
NOTE: The color of
College Graduates
the numbers
reflects the
confidence in the
accuracy of the
data.
16,000 in 2009
Graduate Education
& Training
Of graduates who stay in the US
4,000 in 2009
2009 Total: 83,000
Time to Degree :5.5-7yrs
2009 Graduates: 9,000
skip a postdoc
8% of
International
graduates
leave the US
5,800 in 2009
Postdoctoral
Training
do a postdoc
2009 Total: 37,000
to
1,900 to 3,900
68,000
in 2009
Median Length: 4 years
Post-Training Workforce
Science
Related
NonResearch
6
Governmen
t Research
18%
6%
Biomedical
US- trained
PhD 2008
Biomedical
US- trained
PhD 2008
~24,000
~7,000
Academic
Research
or Teaching
43%
(23% tenured)
Biomedical
US- trained
PhD
2008
~55,000
Industrial
Research
Total of ~150,000
Biomedical
US-trained
(128,000
Biomedical
US-trained
PhDs)PhD’s
NonUnemployed
Science
Related
18%
13%
2%
Biomedical
US- trained
PhD 2008
Biomedical
US- trained
PhD 2008
Biomedical
US- trained
PhD 2008
~22,500
~17,000
~2,500
Institutional Training Programs
• Enhance research training through a coordinated
programmatic approach
• Involve many faculty, multiple departments
• Trainees are selected by the institution
• Parent Announcement Update
T32 FOA updates expected July
appl due January 2014
7
Strategies to Develop a Strong Proposal
1. Start Early
2. Consider why a TG is important for your
program
3. Be very sure there is a PROGRAM
4. Complete tables before finalizing narrative
5. Review the review criteria
6. Explain, explain, explain. Remember reviewers
are expert faculty familiar with training
8
Institutional Training Review Criteria
~750 Electronic TG Submissions (May; Sept, Jan)
Center for Scientific Review to Institute/Center
Study Section—Initial Review Group
3-4 reviewers
Established scientists, many with training experience
Program merit
Scored Review Criteria:
1. Training Program and Environment
2. Training Program Director/Principal Investigator
3. Preceptors/Mentors
4. Trainees
5. Training Record
Overall Impact Score: 1-9
Institute or Center Council
Program relevance, guidance to program staff
9
Hallmarks of Good Training Programs
Student development for biomedical team
experience, contributions, growth, project
Contemporary, mentored research education
broad and deep academic curriculum
research skills and knowledge
conceptual judgment, right questions
communication skills
Career development for multiple outcomes
as a scientist (fellowships, mtgs, papers)
teaching activity? Leadership? Mgmt?
externships? Policy? Workshops?
Responsible Conduct
10
Training Programs are Developmental, not Selection
Potential Trainees
How select for TG and why
Matriculant
UG major
Research Interest
Courses taken
Lab affiliation
PhD Program
Pilot research
11
Program Activities
Planned interventions
Milestone/ Outcomes
Intended changes
Mentored Research
PI, advisory comm
research design
new techniques
Planned Curriculum
knowledge
teaching
Skill building
oral communication
writing workshops
new collaborations
Contemporary science
meet new scientists
Career Exposure
know next steps
Short term
Research publications
Poster, meeting
Fellowship
Longer term
Next position
Biomedical career
Research grants
Mentoring others
Active Program Beyond Research in PI lab
“value added”
PROGRAM IS MORE THAN WORK IN A LAB
Active nomination, selection of candidates from pool
Planned academics with flexibility
Seminars, enhancement activities
Longitudinal program beyond funding
Faculty trainer responsibilities make program strong
Intentional activities to achieve outcomes
12
1. Training Program and Environment
• Are the research facilities and training environment
conducive to prepare trainees for successful careers as
biomedical scientists?
• Do the objectives, design and direction of the proposed
research program ensure effective training?
• Is the proposed program of training likely to ensure that
trainees will be prepared for successful and productive
scientific careers?
• Do the courses, where relevant, and research training
experiences address state-of-the-art science relevant to the
aims of the program?
• Does the program provide training in inter- or
multidisciplinary research and/or provide training in state-ofthe-art or novel methodologies and techniques?
• Is a significant level of institutional commitment to the
program evident?
13
2. Training Program Director/Principal Investigator
Does the Training PD/PI have the scientific background, expertise, and
experience to provide strong leadership, direction, management, and
administration to the program?
His/her trainees, outcomes
Does the PD/PI plan to commit sufficient time to the program to ensure
its success?
Is sufficient administrative and research training support provided for
the program?
Is a strong justification provided that the multiple PD/PI leadership
approach will benefit the training program and the trainees?
roles and responsibilities, governance, and organizational structure
consistent with and justified by training program and with the
complementary expertise of PD/PIs?
14
3. Preceptors/Mentors
Are sufficient numbers of experienced preceptors/mentors with
appropriate expertise and funding available to support the
number and level of trainees proposed in the application?
3-4x faculty available to student, not all one lab…
Do the preceptors/mentors have strong records as researchers,
including successful competition for research support in areas
directly related to the proposed research training program?
How diverse are faculty?
Do the preceptors/mentors have strong records of training preand/or postdoctorates?
15
4. Trainees
Is a recruitment plan proposed with strategies to attract
high quality, diverse, trainees?
Are there well-defined and justified selection criteria and
retention strategies?
Nomination, re-appointment criteria, process
Is there evidence of a competitive applicant pool in
sufficient numbers to warrant the proposed size and
levels?
TG is catalytic, supports a third(?) of relevant TGE
students
16
4. Trainees (cont)
For renewal applications, how successful has program been in
attracting and retaining individuals from diverse populations,
including populations underrepresented in science?
Report Trainees
Training Grant Eligible
Students from groups underrepresented in biomedical science
Students with disabilities, defined as physical or mental
impairment that substantially limits one or more major life
activities.
17
Once in program, students change minds
…and make choices about careers
Graduate students in basic biomedical sciences
• Many initially have goal of academic research
• Midway thru PhD are considering multiple careers
What does the change in attitude mean?
didn’t know possibilities when began grad school
perhaps worried about academic path
learned more about what’s enjoyable
identified next steps for careers
Fuhrmann et al 2011 CBE Life Sci Educn 10: 239-249
18
How Assess Skills and Interests?
Individual Development Plan
To be used in training, fellowships, RPGs…
19
The IDP involves
The scholar
The mentor
self assessment
Survey opportunities
Write IDP
Implement plan
familiarity with opportunities
discuss opportunities
review IDP, help revise
assess new tasks, progress
in light of the plan
1.Skills assessment-strengths and weaknesses
2.Career match- do goals match skills and interest
3.Do it again next year
20
5. Training Record
How successful are the trainees in completing the program?
How productive are trainees in terms of research accomplishments
and publications?
How successful are trainees in obtaining further training
appointments, fellowships, and/or career development awards?
How successful are the trainees in achieving productive scientific
careers, as evidenced by successful competition for research
grants, receipt of honors or awards, high-impact publications,
receipt of patents, promotion to scientific leadership positions,
and/or other such measures of success?
21
5. Training Record
For programs that provide research training to healthprofessional doctorates, is there a record of retaining health
professionals in research training or other research activities for
at least two years?
Does the program have a rigorous evaluation plan to assess the
quality and effectiveness of the training?
Annually assess outcomes?
Adapt to changes?
Test intervention hypothesis?
Are effective mechanisms in place for obtaining feedback from
current and former trainees and monitoring trainees’
subsequent career development?
22
Institutional Training
Additional Review Criteria & Considerations
Additional Review Criteria
Protection for Human Subjects
Inclusion of Women, Minorities, and Children
Vertebrate Animals
Biohazards
Resubmission, Renewal, Revision factors
Additional Review Considerations:
Diversity Recruitment Plan
Training in Responsible Conduct of Research
Select Agent Research
Budget and Period of Support
23
Table 1. Participating Departments
(Finish this table last…complicated)
Table 1. Membership of Participating Departments/Programs
(Alphabetically)
For Renewal
For Renewal
Applications, Postdoctoral
Applications,
Predoctoral
Trainees in Postdoctoral Postdoctoral
Trainees
Department /
Trainees
Trainees
Supported by
Program
With
Supported by
This Training (Supported Participating This Training
Grant
Grant
by Any NIH
Faculty
(TGE)
Training
(TGE)
(TGE)
A/B/C
Grant)
A/B/C
A/B/C
Faculty
Members in
Department /
Program
Faculty
Members
Participating
in This
Application
Predoctoral
Trainees in
Department /
Program
(Supported
by Any NIH
Training
Grant)
Dept. of Biology
45
14
38 (15)
12 (6)
1/1/0
2 (2)
1/0/0
50 (5)
15 (7)
1/0/0
2 (2)
0/0/0
Neuroscience
Program
32
20
31 (20)
14 (7)
2/0/1
4 (4)
0/1/0
40 (7)
23 (10)
0/0/1
2(2)
1/0/0
Dept. of
Pharmacology
(Medical School)
25
5
30 (10)
5 (3)
1/0/0
3 (3)
0/0/0
28 (0)
12 (6)
0/0/1
0 (0)
0/0/0
Totals
N/A
N/A
99 (45)
31 (16)
4/1/1
9 (9)
1/1/0
108 (12)
50 (23)
4 (4)
1/0/0
Participating
Department /
Program
Predoctoral
Trainees With
Participating
Faculty
(TGE)
A/B/C
Table 1 Instructions: Provide the total number of current faculty members, predoctoral trainees, and postdoctoral trainees in each
participating department/program. Indicate the number of faculty members participating in this training grant application, the numbers of
predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees with the participating faculty, and in parenthesis put the number of these trainees who are training
grant eligible (TGE). For renewal applications, include the number of trainees currently supported by the training grant. Faculty members
may count as part of both their primary department and an interdepartmental program(s). Predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees count only
once and should be associated with a single department or program. underrepresented minorities (Group A), who are individuals with
disabilities (Group B), or who are individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds (Group C).
Rationale: This table provides insight into the environment in which training will take place. It allows reviewers to assess whether the
program has the "critical mass" (trainees, faculty and other research personnel, and representation/distribution of scientific disciplines) to
be successful.
24 24
Table 2. Participating Faculty Members
(Easy, easy to modify as program shapes up. Start here)
Table 2. Participating Faculty Members
(Alphabetically by Faculty Member)
Name/Degree(s)
Rank
Primary (& Secondary) Appointment(s)
Role in Program
Research Interest
Abrams-Johnson, Jane, PhD Asst. Prof.
Pharmacology;
(Biochemistry-Medical School)
Mentor
Regulation of Synthesis of
Biogenic Amines
Jones, Lisa S., MD
Res. Asst.
Prof.
Microbiology and Immunology
(Neuroscience Program)
Mentor
Exec Com
Protein Structure, Folding,
and Immunogenicity
Sandoz, J. Miguel, MD, PhD
Assoc. Prof.
Neuroscience Program
Mentor
Developmental Genetics in
Drosophila
Thomas, C. James, III, PhD
Prof. & Chr.
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Program Director
Molecular and Genetic
Analysis of RNA Viruses
Table 2 Instructions: List each training faculty member with his/her degree(s), academic rank, primary departmental affiliation and
secondary appointments, role in the proposed training grant program, and research interests that are relevant to this program.
Rationale: This information allows reviewers to assess the distribution of junior versus senior faculty and clinical versus basic scientists
participating in the training program, as well as their distribution by department. The data concisely summarize the scientific areas of the
training faculty.
25
Table 3. Existing Institutional Training Grants
Table 3. Institutional Training Grant Support Available to Participating Faculty Members, Department(s), or Program(s)
Title of Training Grant
Funding Source
Including
Identifying
Number
Active or
Pending
Project
Period
Program
Director
(Department)
ShortPredoctoral Postdoctoral
Term
Trainees
Trainees
Trainees Total No. of
Supported
Supported Supported Participating
This Year
This Year
This Year
Faculty
Names of
Overlapping
Faculty
Bioimmunotherapy
Training Grant
T32 CA05964-11 06/02-07/07 Baker, A.
(Pathology)
12
25
Abelson
Brown
Fields
Johnson
Sung
Watson
Pharmacological
Sciences
T32 GM04823-01 Pending
10
19
Jones
Jenson
Watson
Genetic Basis of Mental
Illness
T32 MH02708-07 06/03-07/08 Johnson, A.
(Psychiatry)
7
Johnson
Watson
Totals
N/A
N/A
James, C.
(Pharmacology)
N/A
4
4
26
4
0
51
N/A
Table 3 Instructions: List all current and pending training support available to the participating faculty members, department(s) or
programs(s). For each grant, include the title of the training grant; funding source and complete identifying number; status (active or
pending) and dates of the entire project period; name of the program director and department; number(s) of training positions (predoctoral,
postdoctoral, and short term), number of participating faculty members; and list overlapping participating faculty members, who are also
named in this application.
Rationale: This table will permit an evaluation of the level of support for training available to each of the participating
departments/programs and the extent to which the proposed training grant overlaps with or duplicates available training grant support. It is
useful in determining the number of training positions to be awarded.
Explain overlapping faculty!
26
Table 4. Grant Support of Faculty
Table 4. Grant and Contract Support of the Participating Faculty Members
(Alphabetically by Faculty Member)
Faculty
Member
Source of Support, Grant
Number and Status
Faculty Member Role on Project and Grant Title
Project Period
Active
Current Year Direct
Costs Awarded
(Total Direct Costs for
Awards With Substantial
Future Changes)
Jones, J.
NIH 1 R01 CA76259-01 *
PI - Structure and Function of Acetylcholine Receptors
05/09-05/014 *
$190,000
Jones, J.
NIH 5 K08 AI00091-03
PI - Purification & Identification of Receptors
11/03-11/08
$140,000
Mack, T.
American Heart Assoc.
PI - Control of Angiogenesis
03/05-03/08
$185,000
Mack, T.
NSF PCM 80-12935
(D. Stockton, PD/PI)
Co-PI - Cell Culture Center
12/06-12/09
$180,000
Mack, T.
NIH 1 P01 CA71802-02
(D. Stockton, PD/PI)
Project Leader of Subproject 4: "Genetic Control of
Cell Division"
10/05-10/09
$165,000
Smith, J.
None
Zachary, A.
NIH 1 U01 AI-28507-01 *
PI – Human Monoclonal Antibodies as a Therapy for
Staphyloccal Enterotoxin
07/09-07/14 *
$200,000
($3 million)
Table 4 Instructions: For each participating faculty member, list active and pending research grant and contract support from all sources
(including Federal, non-Federal, and institutional research grant and contract support) that will provide the context for research training
experiences, but excluding research training grants. If none, state "None." Include the source of support and grant number; role of the
participating faculty member (PD/PI, co-PD/PI, etc.) in the grant; title, status (use an asterisk (*) to indicate pending sources of support)
and dates of the entire project period; and the current year annual direct costs. If the source of support is part of a multiple project grant (for
example, a P01), additionally identify the PD/PI of the overall project, and provide the above information for that component of the grant
with which the faculty member is associated. For grants with major budget changes in future years such as clinical trials, include the total
direct costs of the award in parentheses.
Rationale: This table provides evidence of the strength of the research environment, the availability of funds to support research
conducted by the trainees, and the appropriateness of the participating faculty members in terms of their active research support.
27
Table 5. Training Record of Faculty
28
Table 5B. Training Record of Faculty
29
Table 6. Publications of Trainees
30
Table 7A. Admissions and Completion Records for
Participating Departments and Programs
Table 7A. Admissions and Completion Records for the Participating Departments and Programs During the Past Five Years
(Predoctoral Applicants)
Department /
Program
31
Applicants Applicants Applicants
Applied
Accepted
Enrolled
Entering
(TGE)
(TGE)
(TGE)
Year
A
A
A/B/C
Trainees
Still in
Program
(TGE)
A/B/C
Trainees
Trainees
Completed
Completed
Program
Program
Trainees
Earned PhD or Earned Other
Left
MD/PhD
Degree
Program
(TGE)
(TGE)
(TGE)
A/B/C
A/B/C
A/B/C
Reason for Leaving
Program
(if training was not
completed)
Department of
Biochemistry
2003
8 (5)
0
6 (4)
0
4 (3)
0/3/1
2 (1)
0/0/0
1 (1)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
1 (1)
0/0/0
Changed career
interests
Department of
Biochemistry
2004
9 (7)
1
6 (4)
10
5 (3)
0/0/0
4 (3)
0/0/0
1 (1)
0/0/0
0(0)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
Department of
Biochemistry
2005
10 (6)
2
8 (5)
1
5 (3)
1/0/0
4 (3)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
MS 1
1/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
Went to medical
school
Department of
Biochemistry
2006
12 (9)
3
10 (6)
1
8 (5)
1/0/0
6 (4)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
2 (1)
0/0/0
1 left for a job in
industry;
1 left for reasons
unknown
Department of
Biochemistry
2007
15 (12)
4
10 (8)
2
8 (6)
2/1/0
8 (6)
2/1/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
Interdepartmental
Graduate Program in
Genetics
2003
125 (9)
5
24 (18)
0
18 (15)
0/0/0
5 (4)
00/0
12 (11)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
1 (0)
0/0/0
Transferred to
Bioengineering PhD
program
Interdepartmental
Graduate Program in
Genetics
2004
123 (91)
3
22 (17
1
16 (16)
1/0/0
10 (10)
0/0/0
4 (4)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
2 (2)
1/0/0
1 transferred to
another institution; 1
enrolled in medical
school
Interdepartmental
Graduate Program in
Genetics
2005
122 (85)
5
21 (19)
0
17 (16)
0/0/0
14 (14)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
MS 1
0/0/0
2 (1)
0/0/0
1 left for job in
industry;
1 enrolled in dental
school
Interdepartmental
Graduate Program in
Genetics
2006
130 (83)
5
35 (22)
4
20 (19)
3/0/0
18 (17)
2/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
0 (0)
0/0/0
2 (2)
1/0/0
1 transferred to
neuroscience training
program; 1 teaching
science in high school
Table 8A.
Qualifications of Recent Predoctoral Applicants
Table 8A. Qualifications of Recent Predoctoral Applicants
Department /
Program
Year
Applicant
(List by
Number)
Previous
Institution(s)
Degree(s)
& Year(s)
GRE Scores
V, Q, Adv
(Percentiles)
and/or MCAT
Scores
Support
from this
Undergrad Interviewed Accepted Enrolled
Grant
GPA
(Y/N)
(Y/N)
(Y/N)
(Y/N)
2007 Medical Scientist
Training Program
1*
U. of WI
BSN '06
12, 11, Q, 10
3.63
Y
Y
Y
Y
2007 Medical Scientist
Training Program
2*
Stanford
BS '06
11, 13, N, 11
3.72
Y
Y
N
JHU
N
2007 Medical Scientist
Training Program
3
Yale U.
Wash. U.
BA '05
MS '06
10, 9, O, 11
660 680 740
3.78
Y
N
N
N
2007 Molecular Biophysics
Program
1*
U. of IL
BS '06
700
730
720
4.0
Y
Y
Y
Y
2007 Molecular Biophysics
Program
2*
Rutgers
BS '07
710
690
680
3.36
Y
Y
Y
Y
2007 Molecular Biophysics
Program
3
Berkeley
BS '07
680
710
720
3.68
Y
Y
N
UCSF
N
2007 Molecular Biophysics
Program
4*
U. of TX
BS '07
720 690 750
(97%) (79%)
(85%)
3.73
Y
Y
N
JHU
N
2007 Molecular Biophysics
Program
5*
Tufts U.
BS '06
650
670
630
3.32
N
N
N
N
2007 Molecular Biophysics
Program
6
U. of Kyoto
BS '05
480
710
720
N/A
N
N
N
N
Program Statistics
32
Total Number
of Applicants
Number of TGE
Applicants
Applicants
Interviewed
Applicants
Accepted
Applicants
Enrolled
Applicants
Supported By
This Grant
9
6
7
6
3
3
Average GRE /
MCAT Scores
11, 11,11
702 705 718
Average GPA
3.65
Table 9A. Qualifications of Current
Predoctoral Trainees
Table 9A. Qualifications of the Current Predoctoral Trainees Clearly Associated with the Training Program
Department /
Program
Undergraduate
GPA
Current
Research
Mentor
Years in
Program
Calendar
Years
Appointed
to This
Grant
3.63
Jones, J.
'07-present
None
12, 12, R, 14
3.72
Huerta, X.
'05-present
'06-'07
BA '05
MS '07
700 710 640
(96% 82% 84%)
3.75
Felman, R.
'07-present
'06-present
BA '07
650 710 630
(80% 92% 83%)
3.34
TBN
'07-present
None
Trainee
(List by Number)
Previous
Institution(s)
Degree(s) &
Year(s)
Biochem
1*
U. of WI
BSN '06
Genetics
2*
MIT
BS '06
Genetics
3*
U. Penn.
Wash. U.
Genetics
4
U. Mich.
GRE Scores /
(Percentiles)
V, Q, Adv
and/or
MCAT Scores
680
Program Statistics
33
Total Number
of Trainees
Number of TGE
Trainees
Average GRE /
MCAT Scores
4
3
690, 705, 695
12, 12, R, 14
Average GPA
3.61
720
750
Table 10. Admissions and Completion
Records of Underrepresented Individuals
Table 10: Admissions and Completion Records for Underrepresented Minority (URM) Trainees, Trainees with Disabilities, and
Trainees from Disadvantaged Backgrounds Clearly Associated With the Training Program
Diversity
Recruitment
Group
Trainee
(List by
Number)
Entering
Year
(Pre/Post)
URM Trainees
1*
2006
(Pre)
Genetics
T32 GM001122
F31
URM Trainees
1*
2007
(Post)
Cell Biology
University Fellowship
Research
URM Trainees
1*
2007
(Post)
Chemistry
Lectureship
Trainees With
Disabilities
1*
2004
(Pre)
Pharmacology
T32 GM001144
F31
Trainees With
Disabilities
2*
2006
(Post)
Cell Biology
R01
Trainees With
Disabilities
3
2007
(Post)
Medicine
Research Associate
Trainees From
Disadvantaged
Backgrounds
1*
2005
(Pre)
Genetics
T32 GM001155
F31
34
Department /
Program
Source of Support
and if Support by
NRSA Grant
In
Training
Completed
Training
Left Without
Completing
Training
Y
Current Status
Career or
Employment
Postdoctoral Trainee
UCSF
Y
Mentor and student
both moved to another
institution
Y
Y
Postdoctoral Trainee
NYU
Y
Career Change
Y
Y
Postdoctoral Trainee
U. Chicago
Table 11. Appointments to the Training Grant
for each Year of Past Award
Table 11. Appointments to the Training Grant For Each Year of the Past Award (Renewal Applications Only)
Grant Year
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
2006-2007
2007-2008
Predoctoral Positions Awarded (Months of Support)
10 (120)
12 (144)
14 (168)
14 (168)
14 (168)
Predoctoral Trainees Appointed (Months of Support Used)
10 (120)
131 (144)
14 (168)
132 (156)
14 (168)
Predoctoral URM Trainees Appointed (Months of Support)
1 (12)
2 (24)
(0)
1 (12)
1 (12)
Predoctoral Trainees with Disabilities Appointed (Months of Support)
1 (12)
0 (0)
1 (12)
2 (12)
0 (0)
Predoctoral Trainees from Disadvantaged Background Appointed
(Months of Support)
0 (0)
0 (0)
0 (0)
0 (0)
1 (12)
Postdoctoral Positions Awarded (Months of Support)
4 (48)
4 (48)
4 (48)
4 (48)
4 (48)
Postdoctoral Trainees With MD Appointed
1
1
2
1
2
Postdoctoral Trainees With MD/PhD Appointed
2
1
1
0
0
Postdoctoral Trainees With PhD Appointed
1
1
0
1
2
Postdoctoral Trainees With Other Degree Appointed
0
DrPH
DrPH
PharmD
0
Postdoctoral Trainees Appointed (Months of Support Used)
4 (48)
4 (48)
4 (48)
3 (38)3
4 (48)
Postdoctoral URM Trainees Appointed (Months of Support)
1 (12)
2 (24)
0 (0)
1 (12)
1 (12)
Postdoctoral Trainees with Disabilities Appointed (Months of Support)
0 (0)
0 (0)
0 (0)
0 (0)
0 (0)
Postdoctoral Trainees from Disadvantaged Background Appointed
(Months of Support)
0 (0)
0 (0
0 (0)
0 (0)
1 (12)
1
One trainee left after 6 months and a second trainee was appointed for the remainder of the year.
One position was not filled.
3
A fourth trainee was appointed, but fell ill and dropped out after 2 months. It was then too late to recruit a replacement trainee.
2
35
Table 12A. Predoctoral Trainees Supported
by this Training Grant
Table 12A. Predoctoral Trainees Supported by This Training Grant (Renewal Applications Only)
Predoctoral (and MSTP) Trainees (Listed Sequentially by Entering Class)
Enter Source(s) of Support and Academic Year for Each Grant Year
Trainee, Year of
Entry Prior Degree & Grant Grant Grant Grant Grant Grant Grant Grant Grant Grant
Institution (Mentor – Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year Year
Department /
-01
-02
-03
-04
-05
-06
-07
-08
-09
-10
Program)
95-99 99-00 00-01 01-02 02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08
Cox, C., 1994 BA,
Cornell Univ.
(Jones-Biochem.)
TG
TG
RG
Smith, J. G., 1995 BS,
Iowa State U.
(Gordon-MCB)
TG
TG
RG
Johnson, J., 2002
BPharm, Duquesne
(Jacobs-Virology)
TG2
Smolock, Y., 2005 BS,
UCLA
(Rifkind-Genetics)
Thomas, G., 2007
DVM,
U. Penn
(unassigned)
RG/
TG3
TG
TG
RG
RG
UF
UF
TG
Title of
Research
Project or
Research
Topic
Current
Position and
Institution
Degree(s)
Received (Grant Support
(Year)
Obtained)
Cloning of
Human Globin
Genes
MD, PhD
(2002)
Asst. Prof.
Hematology,
Rutgers (50%
clinical, 50%
research, NIH
K11)
Structural
Studies of
MembraneBound Proteins
M.S.
(2001)
Parke-Davis
(Lab.
Technician)
Regulation of
EBV Gene
Expression
PhD
(2007)
Postdoctoral
Trainee w/C.
Chen, Univ. of
CA, Davis
Purine
Synthesis
Mutants in
Mammalian
Cells
TG
TG1, TG2...Early, late…Explain use of slots!
36
In Training
In Training
Table 12A. Predoctoral Trainees Supported
by this Training Grant (cont)
Program Statistics
37
Percentage of Trainees Entering 10 Years Ago
That Completed Ph.D.s
Average Time to Ph.D. for Students in the Last 10 Years
(not including leaves of absence)
50%
6.5 years
The Narrative
Background
Describe data in Tables 1, 2, 3:
Departmental Membership, Participating
Faculty Members, Other TG Support
Program Plan
What students will do & why
timeline? Course structure? Expectations?
•Program Faculty
Describe data in Tables 4, 5, 6:
Faculty Grant Support, Trainees, Publication
of Trainees
38
The Narrative (cont)
•
•
•
•
•
Proposed Training
Training Program Evaluation
Trainee Candidates-Recruitment
Institutional Environment and Commitment
Admissions and Completion Records of Trainees
(Tables 7A and/or 7B)
• Qualifications of Applicants (Tables 8A and/or
8B)
39
The Narrative (cont)
• Current Trainee Qualifications (Tables 9A
and/or 9B)
• Recruitment and Retention Plan to Enhance
Diversity (Tables 1, 7 A/B, Renewal Apps
Table 10)
• Plan for Instruction in Responsible Conduct
of Research
• For Renewal Applications—Progress
Report (Tables 11, 12 A and/orB)
40
Narrative (cont)
Human Subjects
Vertebrate Animals
Select Reagent Research
Multiple PD/PI leadership plan
Consortium/Contractural Agreements
Faculty biosketches
Appendix
41
The Narrative (cont)
Human Subjects
Vertebrate Animals
Select Reagent Research
Multiple PD/PI Leadership Plan
Consortium/Contractual Agreements
FACULTY BIOSKETCHES
Appendix
42
Thank You
For more info contact:
Alison Hall PhD [email protected]

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