6 key Elements of a situated Activity System

Report
Jordan Daniel
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Who are you designing it for?

Old, Young, Men, Women, etc.?

Who is the target audience
Characteristics of a birthday party of a 10 year
old.
Of a concert.

Everything affect the 5 senses
Visual
 Auditory
 Smell
 Touch
 Taste

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
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Changing the setting can change the event
Know the limits of a setting
Settings can be manipulated

San Marcos vs College Station
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Real life example: Concert near a paper mill


3 types: Physical, Social, Symbolic
Identify the key objects!

What makes the event “happen”

Can an Easter Egg Hunt happen without Easter
eggs?


Structure determines how interactions may or
may not happen.
Rules/Regulations/Laws must be well thought
out and planned in a meaningful way.

Do not over-regulate
Give me some examples.

Have to have uniformity across the board.

Do the participants know each other?

How can this change the program?


What can you do to deal with this?
What problems can arise from this?

The situation:
To promote open access to football games, an athletic
department only allows 5 tickets to be purchased by
a single person.
What are the outcomes?

Set into motion and sustaining momentum

What would you do for a concert?


A wedding?
A party?

How do you handle animation without making
it seem forced?

We have all been to “those” kind of parties

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Facilitator vs Direct Provider
Programing Formats
Self directed
 Clubs/ groups
 Drop-in
 Competition
 Special events
 Skill Development


Lets decide which format is the right one for
the activity
The 6 elements:
Interacting People
Physical Setting
Leisure Objects
Structure
Relationships
Animation

Rossman, J. R., & Schlatter, B. E. (2008).
Recreation Programming: Designing Leisure
Experiences. Champaign, Illinois: Sagamore
Publishing, LLC.

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