Class 6-F14

Report
ED LA320
Class 6-F14
Welcome to Class #6
• Please draw a card to determine where you will sit.
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Derivational Suffixes
Inflectional Suffixes: Verbs
Inflectional Suffixes: Nouns
Inflectional Suffixes: Adjectives
Analogies: Onset-Rime
• Copies of the RICA Review are on the tables for you to
begin.
Thank you,
Ann and Danielle
RICA Review
• Answer the practice RICA questions.
• Submit only if you think you may have
answered all correctly.
Hitting the “Pause” Button
• Running Records
• Chapter 2 - Lit Assessment (Word Analysis for
beginning/fluent readers)
• Cued Retelling
• Chapter 3 – Lit Assessment (Comprehension)
• Word Analysis Lesson Plan Workshop Time
Chapter 3 Reading Guide
Cueing Systems - Review
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Grapho-Phonic
Syntactic
Semantic
Pragmatic
• Note: You may refer to your Cueing Systems
Foldable (Class 2 – Septmber 15 – green)
LITERACY ASSESSMENT
Chapter 2: Reading - Word Analysis [Beginning/Fluent]
Running Records
Literacy Assessmetn – CH 2
Literacy Assessment –
Chapter 2 for Beginning/Fluent Readers
• CH 2: Reading – Word Analysis
• Running Records are appropriate assessment
tools for Early/Beginning and Fluent Readers.
• You must complete 1 running record, although,
depending on results you might consider doing
an addition RR.
• Running Records can yield information about
which cueing systems a reader uses when he/she
reads.
• As well, it can be used to determine a child’s
independent and instructional reading levels.
Functional Reading Levels
• Any given text is at one of the following reading
levels for any given student.
• Independent
• Instructional
• Frustration
• See Resources file on course website
• The same text that is at the independent reading
level for one student may be at the frustration
reading level of another.
Why Running Records?
• To better understand what readers are doing,
which informs subsequent instruction.
• Helps us understand what strategies readers are
employing and how effective those strategies
are.
• Focuses on strengths (as well as stretches),
doesn’t oversimplify, doesn’t label readers
Why Running Records?
• RR is an empirical process:
• After listening to a reader read, and after
discussing what the reader has read, the teacher
creates a profile of the reader.
• The goal is to consider how a reader uses multiple
cueing systems to construct meaning from print
text.
• What is already known by the reader provides a
useful context in which to embed new learning.
The 4 Cueing Systems a la RR
• Grapho-Phonic Cueing System
• In Running Record, this is coded as V (Visual)
• Syntactic Cueing System
• In Running Record, this is coded as S (Structure)
• Semantic Cueing System
• In Running Record, this is coded as M (Meaning)
RR – only part of the picture
• Remember: No one reading assessment or
task is sufficient on its own.
• The RR is one of the most essential
components of a comprehensive
assessment of a reader.
Running Record – The teacher listens as the student
reads aloud marking errors and self-corrections.
Suggested Conventions for
Recording RR
1. Mark every correct word with a
1. Record a substitution above the text
child: home
(one error)
text: house
1. If a child tries several times to read a word, record
all trials
child: here / h-- / home (one error)
text: house
child: h-/ h-text: house
/ house
(no error)
Suggested Conventions for
Recording RR (cont)
4. If a child succeeds in correcting a previous error
this is recorded as a self-correction (SC)
child: where / when / SC
(no error)
text: were
5. If a child deletes a word record with a dash or
inserts a word, record the word
child:
-----(one error)
text: house
child:
here
text: -------
(one error)
Suggested Conventions for
Recording RR (cont)
6. If a child is unable to proceed, s/he is told the
word (“T” for teacher)
child: home / T
(one error)
text: house
7. A = Asks for help
7. TTA = Try that again
7. Repetition is not counted as an error, but
recorded with a R or R2 or R3 etc.…
child: Here is the home / R / SC / (no error)
text: Here is the house
Sample RR
TEXT
And how he came to
be called Maniac.
The town was buzzing.
The schools were buzzing.
Hallways. Lunchrooms.
Running Record
toon
bussing /SC_
town
buzzing
We recommend investing $1.99 for the Running
Records App – it makes things MUCH easier!
Running Record Practice #1
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You are going to practice Running Record.
Please know that this process takes time and
experience to become proficient.
1. Read the text that the student will read aloud.
2. Listen to the recording a Kindergartner reading
the text.
3. Using the marking system, record what you
hear as the student reads aloud.
4. With a partner, review you what you recorded.
Gabriel
RR WITH EMERGENT READER
RR Sample #1
Text
Look, Dick.
Look, Jane.
Look and see.
See Baby.
See, see.
Oh, oh, oh.
Oh, Dick.
Look and see.
See Baby.
Look, Jane, look.
See Baby.
Oh, oh, oh.
Funny, funny Baby.
Information Used
E SC
MSV
MSV
_______________________________
Analyzing the RR
• Credit the child with any correct words.
• There are no penalty for trials which are eventually
correct.
• Insertions add errors, so that a child can have more
errors in a line than words.
• If a line or sentence is omitted each word is counted
as an error.
• Repeated errors (e.g. run is read as ran) count as an
error, but substitution of a proper name only counts
the first time.
What kind of information does
the child use?
• You will need to look at each error and selfcorrection and ask yourself, “Now, what led the child
to say/do that? What cueing system were they
using?”
• M = meaning.
• Did the child use meaning?
• S = structure.
• Is it syntactically appropriate?
• V = visual info.
• Is the child using grapho-phonic information?
RR Sample Form Revisited
Text
Look, Dick.
Look, Jane.
Look and see.
See Baby.
See, see.
Oh, oh, oh.
Oh, Dick.
Look and see.
See Baby.
Look, Jane, look.
See Baby.
Oh, oh, oh.
Funny, funny Baby.
Information Used
E SC
MSV
MSV
_______________________________
Calculations for Error Rate
RW = Running Words; E = Errors; SC = Self Corrections
Error Rate
E
RW
e.g. 3 = Ratio 1:11
32
Calculations for Accuracy
RW = Running Words; E = Errors; SC = Self Corrections
Accuracy Rate
RW– E = Score
Score ÷ RWx100 = accuracy
e.g. 32
- 3 = 29
29 ÷ 32 x 100 = .0906
= 91% (1:11)
This book is at the
child’s instructional
reading level.
Or, you can use the app…
Calculations:
• Running Words = 32
• Errors = 3
• Self Corrections = 0
Running Record Practice #2
•
You are going to practice Running Record again.
Please know that this process takes time and
experience to become proficient.
1. Read the text that the student will read aloud.
2. Listen to the recording a 2nd grader reading a
text passage from Diary of a Wimpy Kid.
3. Using the marking system, record what you
hear as the student reads aloud.
4. With a partner, review you what you recorded.
Kai
RUNNING RECORD-FLUENT READER
Running Record Practice #2
Text
Well, I learned my lesson about getting
a ride home from Mom, so I’m back
to walking to school. But when I was
heading home from Rowley this
afternoon, I seriously didn’t think I
had the energy to make it up the hill
to my house. So I asked Rowley if
he’d give me a piggyback ride.
Rowley didn’t exactly jump at the idea,
so I had to remind him that we’re best
friends and this is the kind of thing
best friends do for each other. He
finally caved when I offered…
Information Used
E SC
MSV
MSV
_______________________________
What kind of information does
the child use?
• You will need to look at each error and selfcorrection and ask yourself, “Now, what led the child
to say/do that? What cueing system were they
using?”
• M = meaning.
• Did the child use meaning?
• S = structure.
• Is it syntactically appropriate?
• V = visual info.
• Is the child using grapho-phonic information?
Calculations
Calculations:
• Running Words = 243
• Errors = 4
• Self Corrections = 3
Reading Levels
• Any given text is at one of the following reading
levels for any given student.
• Independent: 95%-100% accuracy
• Instructional: 90-94% accuracy
• Frustration: Below 90%
• Reading level is also dependent on their
comprehension, which we will discuss next week.
• The same text that is at the independent reading
level for one student may be at the frustration
reading level for another.
RUNNING RECORD-MORE PRACTICE
Running Record Practice #3
•
You are going to practice Running Record yet
again. Yes, this process takes time and
experience to become proficient.
1. Read the text that the student will read aloud.
2. Listen to the recording a 5th grader reading a
text passage from Maniac Magee.
3. Using the marking system, record what you
hear as the student reads aloud.
4. With a partner, review you what you recorded.
Running Record Practice #3
Text
And how he came to be called Maniac.
The town was buzzing. The schools
were buzzing. Hallways.
Lunchrooms. Streets. Playgrounds.
West end. East end. Buzzing about
the new kid in town. The stranger kid.
Scraggly. Carrying a book. Flap-soled
sneakers.
The kid who intercepted Brian Denehy’s
pass to Hands Down and punted it
back longer than Denehy himself
ever threw it. The kid who tattooed
Giant John McNab’s fastball for half a
dozen home runs then cicrcled the
sacks on a bunted frog…
Information Used
E SC
MSV
MSV
_______________________________
What kind of information does
the child use?
• You will need to look at each error and selfcorrection and ask yourself, “Now, what led the child
to say/do that? What cueing system were they
using?”
• M = meaning.
• Did the child use meaning?
• S = structure.
• Is it syntactically appropriate?
• V = visual info.
• Is the child using grapho-phonic information?
Calculations
Calculations:
• Running Words = 294
• Errors = 32
• Self Corrections = 5
Reading Levels
• Any given text is at one of the following reading
levels for any given student.
• Independent: 95% - 100% accuracy
• Instructional: 90-94% accuracy
• Frustration: Below 90%
• Reading level is also dependent on their
comprehension, which we will discuss next week.
• The same text that is at the independent reading
level for one student may be at the frustration
reading level for another.
Basic Procedures for RR
• Prepare a text passage for the child to read.
• that is representative of what you consider to be “developmentally
appropriate.” A good length for 3rd grade and up is 300 words and
150-200 for younger students).
• Estimate reading level of text.
• You may do this by looking at the back of the book, considering the
origin of the text, checking with one of the readability formulas on
your computer.
• Child should have the text; you have the
copy to mark.
NOTE: Prepare cued retelling sheet for this text
A Word about Fluency
See Tompkins [6e] pp. 183-194
• Involves three components:
• Accuracy - Word recognition (recognizing
words automatically-automaticity)
• Pace - Reading rate (the speed at which the
student reads)
• Expression - Prosody (the ability to read
expressively with appropriate phrasing and
intonation)
• Fluency and reading comprehension are correlated
(La Berge & Samuels, 1976; Perfitti, 1985;
Stanovich, 1986).
Some Characteristics of Students Who Do Not
Read Fluently:
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Read slowly, word by word and without expression
Cannot decode individual words
Try to sound out phonetically irregular words
Guess at words based on beginning sound
Do not remember a word the second or third time in
a passage
Do not break words into syllables or parts
Point to words as they read
Repeat words and phrases
Ignore punctuation marks
Do not remember or understand what they read
BREAK
Story/Strategy
• The story for this class is Loser by Jerry Spinelli.
• The strategy is cued retelling. We will also be
talking about this strategy as an assessment tool
(*You will use this in Chapter 3 of the Literacy Assessment).
• This class will provide an introduction to listening
and reading comprehension.
Cued Retelling
• Choose a partner. Determine who is A and who
is B.
• Person A begins by retelling everything s/he
remembers from the story. Person B marks the
cued retelling sheet.
• Use the cued retelling sheet provided.
• B cues A as necessary (see next slide).
Cued Retelling
• Possible cues:
• What can you tell me about…?
• What do you remember about…?
• What happens when...
LITERACY ASSESSMENT
Chapter 3: Reading Comprehension
Cued Retelling as Assessment
Cued retelling allows us to differentiate
between what is remembered
(memory/recall) and what is understood
(comprehension).
Cued retelling is also referred to as
“aided retelling.”
Tompkins (6e), p. 277
Cued Retelling as Assessment
• Cued retelling gives the student the
opportunity to articulate what s/he
remembers and then also to use retrieval
cues (bits of information supplied by the
teacher or peer) to facilitate further recall.
Procedure for Cued Retelling
1. Prepare the cued retelling sheet using the
passage/text you selected for this as well as the
running record. Identify aspects of the
story/text that you consider important and
essential to comprehension.
• Be sure to think about setting, characters and
plot (conflict/actions/resolution). You may
want to show this to your cooperating teacher
to be sure you have included what s/he
considers the key events as well.
Procedure for Cued Retelling
2. After the student has read the text, ask
him/her to tell you about the story they have
just read, as if they were telling it to someone
who had never read or seen the story before.
• You may want to tape record this so you have it for
future reference.
Procedure for Cued Retelling
3. As the student is retelling the story, check off
each item that s/he mentions. Pay attention to
the student's use of detail, sequence of events,
story structure, etc. Once the student indicates
that s/he is finished, look to see if s/he left out
anything on your sheet. If so, then ask the
student, "Can you tell me anything about .....?”
or “What do you remember about…?”
• These are intended to be prompts.
Procedure for Cued Retelling
4. Consider this information and what it tells you
about this student's reading or listening
comprehension. Think about story structure.
Does the student include setting, characters and
plot (conflict & resolution) in her/his retelling?
Does s/he provide details?
Was s/he able to describe them after cued?
If not, could s/he find the information in the
text?
USE THE FORM!
Cued Retelling- Considerations
*See prompts in the Literacy Assessment Chapter 3 description
• How many events are freely recalled?
• Where did the student start his/her
retelling? Does s/he retell events in order?
• How does the student respond affectively?
• What similarities/differences do you
notice between the two retellings?
Literacy Assessment
• You will do TWO cued retellings.
• Emergent Readers: you will choose either a familiar
and an unfamiliar text, a narrative and an expository
text, or you may also choose to read aloud an
illustrated text and and another without
illustrations, assessing listening comprehension. If
student can read, follow procedures for
beginning/fluent readers.
• Beginning/fluent readers: you will choose either a
familiar and an unfamiliar text, a narrative and an
expository text, or an oral and a silent reading of two
comparable texts.
WA Workshop Time!
WA Workshop Time
• You are encouraged to sit next to a colleague whom
you trust to give you critical and instructive
feedback.
• You have FB forms that are designed to facilitate
your analysis of your colleague’s WA Lesson Plan
draft.
• You may make margin notes, use post-it notes, edit
directly on your lap top… Whatever works for you!
• The objective is for you to ask questions and glean
insights.
Homework
Read:
• Tompkins Chapter 8: Promoting Comprehension: Reader
Factors (pp. 248-287)
Do:
• HW Reading Guide – Chapter 8 (Website: Class 6 Materials)
• Download and bring Cloze information (Website: Literacy
Assessment Chap. 3 Reading Comprehension)
• Word Analysis Lesson Plan assignment (K-2) due Oct. 20
• Word Analysis Lesson Plan assignment (3-6+ESC) due Oct. 27

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