Formal curriculum - Flanders Knowledge Area

Report
Flamenco / Adinsa forum
met steun van
het departement Onderwijs en Vorming
Internationale competenties in het curriculum
to do’s voor personeel en organisatie
Brussel, 15 januari 2013
Internationalisation at Home:
A moving concept
Wendy Green, The University of Queensland
Jos Beelen, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences
Internationalisation at Home
• Malmö, 1999
• Not opposed to outgoing mobility
• Formal, informal and hidden
IaH in Flanders
Verslag aan AHORO omtrent conferentie Internationalisering @ Home van 29
maart 2001
Internationalisation at Home
is aimed at all students and is therefore part of
the compulsory programme.
Internationalisation at Home
is a set of instruments and activities ‘at home’
that focus on developing international and
intercultural competences in all students.
Internationalisation at Home
is based on the assumption that, while students
will travel for personal reasons, the majority will
not travel for study related purposes
Internationalisation at Home
may include short-term outgoing mobility in the
form of study visits or research assignments that
are a component of the compulsory curriculum.
Internationalisation at Home
only includes the individual experiences of
students undertaken during study and
placement abroad if these are integrated into
the home institution’s standard assessment
tools (such as the portfolio for all students).
Curriculum internationalisation
Europe:
Internationalisation at Home
UK and Australia:
Internationalisation of the
Curriculum (IoC)
USA:
Campus Internationalisation
IoC – the evolution of a concept
Original definition – focus on curriculum content
A curriculum with an international orientation in
content and/or form, aimed at preparing students
for performing (professionally and socially) in an
international and multicultural context and
designed for domestic and/or foreign students
(Internationalising the Curriculum in Higher
Education, OECD, 1996).
More recent developments
Focus on systematic approach
The process of integrating an international,
intercultural, or global dimension into the purpose,
functions or delivery of post-secondary education
(Knight 2004, p. 11).
Focus on learning processes and outcomes
Internationalisation of the curriculum is the
incorporation of an international and intercultural
dimension into the preparation, delivery and
outcomes of a program of study (Leask 2009, p.
209).
Comprehensive Internationalization
John Hudzik defines as…
Commitment and action to integrate international,
global and comparative content and perspective
throughout the teaching, research and service missions
of higher education
But stresses that…
You can’t have comprehensive internationalization
without internationalization of the curriculum
Comprehensive internationalisation at The
University of Queensland (UQ), Australia
Regarding Teaching &Learning
– Achieving benefits in core learning outcomes for
all students
– Becoming an institutional imperative not just a
desirable possibility.
Proposed framework for comprehensive
internationalisation of T&L at UQ
Informal
Curriculum
Formal
curriculum
Elective
(enriched &
specialised)
Formal
curriculum
Core
Review &
development
thru APR
IaH
Looks different in every context
Dimensions of IoC
‘IoC in Action’
Betty Leask, ALTC National Teaching Fellowship
How can we internationalise the curriculum in this discipline
area in this particular institutional context and ensure that,
as a result, we improve the learning outcomes of all
students?’
• 13 Australian universities
• Disciplines – Nursing; Journalism; Social Sciences; Public
Relations; Management; Accounting; Applied Science;
Medicine
• At UQ – Nursing/Midwifery and
Journalism/Communications
IaH
Needs contextualised staff development
IoC in disciplinary contexts
IaH
Is not just about an individual course
IaH
Is supported by communities of practice
IaH
Is owned by academic staff
IaH
Is dynamic in concept and practice
IaH
Has many stakeholders
IaH
Requires a systemic approach
IaH
Is about learning outcomes
Top 3 internal obstacles
Insufficient
financial
resources
Limited faculty
interest
Limited
expertise of
staff/lack of
foreign
language
proficiency
World
Africa
Asia&
Pacific
Europe
Latin
America
27%
29%
11%
11%
Middle
East
North
America
24%
25%
29%
31%
32%
11%
11%
13%
9%
10%
8%
11%
12%
11%
12%
11%
6%
Source: IAU 3rd Global Survey report 2010

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