Paul Massera, DWR - California Association of Resource

Report
Planning for California's Water Future
California Association of Resource
Conservation Districts
November 13, 2014
1
California Precipitation
Variable & Extreme
Over Time & Location
Most precipitation occurs
November - March
California Statewide Precipitation
2
SOURCE: http://education.usgs.gov/california/resources.html#water
California’s
Major River
Systems
Average
56 MAF (~80%)
Annual
15 MAF
(~1/3 ) Runoff
~71 MAF/Year
15 MAF (~20%)
Distribution of
Average Runoff
29 MAF (~2/3)
Distribution of
Water Use
N
3
The Delta Estuary at the
heart of the California
water system
74%
Sacramento
River Valley
8%
10%
In-Delta
Uses
Eastside Tributaries
/In-Delta Precipitation
16%
65%
San Joaquin
River
Outflow to
Suisun and San
Francisco Bays
= Sources of Water
Into the Delta
12%
= Water Deliveries
and Flow Out of
the Delta
Central Valley
Project, Mostly
Agriculture
15%
Los Angeles
State Water Project,
Mostly Southern
California Urban and
Industrial Use
San Diego
SOURCE: California Water: An LAO Primer, 2008
4
California Water Supply Systems
4%
22%
12%
7%
55%
Local
--
38.3 maf
Colorado --
4.8 maf
Federal
--
8.1 maf
State
--
2.9 maf
Groundwater -- 15.0 maf
1998-2005 average.. Does not include reuse or recycling. Quantities vary by year.
5
California’s Water Reservoirs
 Snow Pack
 Surface Storage
 Groundwater Basins
 Soil Moisture
6
Snow Pack
California’s Largest Surface Reservoir
13.5 MAF/year
Sacramento Valley
Reservoir Storage
15 MAF/year
Snow Pack
Storage
11 MAF/year
San Joaquin Valley
Reservoir Storage
7
Water is the Essence of Life
 Reduce flood risk
Statewide .
 Provide safe drinking
water.
 Improve water quality
for fisheries and
recreation.
 Clean, safe water
supplies.
 Enhance Bay -Delta
ecosystem .
 Restore terrestrial and
aquatic habitats .
 Improve watershed
management .
 Raise awareness and
increase stewardship .
 Enhance State
economic output .
 Contribute to job
creation and security .
 Promote food
production security .
 Provide stable funding
for infrastructure .
A System in Crisis
Reduced Prosperity for Future Generations
Greater Drought Impacts - Unreliable
Water Supplies
Increasing Flood Risk
Groundwater Depletion and Subsidence
Degraded Water Quality
Declining Environmental Conditions
Aging Infrastructure
9
Climate Change
A Costly Challenge for all Californians
10
Change in Groundwater
Storage 2005 - 2010
Sac River Region
-0.7 to -1.7 maf
SJ River Region
-1.0 to -2.6 maf
Tulare Lake Region
-3.7 to -8.9 maf
Water Scenarios 2050
Extreme Uncertainty in Future Demands
12
Interconnected Systems Require
Integrated Solutions
13
California’s Drought 2014
• 2014 third dry year statewide
• Statewide storage well below average
• Groundwater basins are being depleted
• Feb - March rain helped, but drought persists
• State & federal water project operations restricted
by regulatory actions to protect the Delta
• Local conditions are degrading
• High level of local, State and federal coordination
• 2015 could also be dry
• More frequent or longer droughts are likely
D R O U G H T
P R E P A R E D N E S S
&
R E S P O N S E
Statewide Drought Conditions
Extreme Drought
+ 82%
Exceptional Drought +58%
Population Affected by Drought
37,253,959
United States Drought Monitor
Sept 2, 2014
D R O U G H T
P R E P A R E D N E S S
&
R E S P O N S E
State of California Taking Action
• EO to streamline water transfers (May 2013)
• PRD Governor’s Water Action Plan &
CA Water Plan Update 2013 (Oct 2013)
• State Drought Task Force Established (Dec 2013)
• Governor’s Drought Proclamation &
Water Action Plan
(Jan 2014)
• Drought Emergency
Funding (March)
• EO to redouble
Drought Response
(April)
Sustainable Groundwater Management*
Phase 1
Realign
Governance
Phase 2
Develop & Adopt
Groundwater
Sustainability
Plans
Phase 3
Prepare Water
Budgets to
Improve GW
Management
Phase 4
Realize
Sustainable
Groundwater
Management
GWS agencies
Governance
GWS agencies
GWS agencies
prepare
and
adopt
an
developed, adopted,
manage GW based achieve objectives in
acceptable
and addressed by
on a water budget
GW Sustainability
groundwater
GWS agencies
framework
Plans
sustainability plan
(Years 1-3)
(Years 4-8)
(Years 6-10)
(Years 10-14)
*From 2014 sustainable groundwater management legislation,
including provisions for State “backstop” measures
Governor’s Water Action Plan
A 5-Year Plan to Meet 3 Broad Goals

Reliability --

Restoration –

Resilience --
more reliable water supplies for
our farms & communities
restoring important
wildlife habitat & species
more resilient, sustainably
managed water systems
& environment (supply, quality,
flood protection & ecosystems)
The California Water Plan

First published in 1957 as Bulletin 3

Water Code requires DWR to
update Water Plan every 5 years –
10 updates (Bulletin 160)

Strong nexus with Governor’s
Water Action Plan

Tool for guiding investment priorities and
legislative action

Update 2013 lays out recommendations
-- no mandates or appropriations
19
Proposition 1
Investing in Integrated Water Management
Water Supply
$4,235
• Dams and groundwater storage—cost share associated with public benefits.
$2,700
810
• Regional projects to achieve multiple water-related improvements (includes conservation and
capturing rainwater).
• Water recycling, including desalination.
Watershed Protection and Restoration
• Watershed restoration and habitat protection in designated areas around the state.
• Certain state commitments for environmental restorations.
725
$1,495
$515
475
• Restoration programs available to applicants statewide.
305
• Projects to increase water flowing in rivers and streams.
200
Improvements to Groundwater and Surface Water Quality
• Prevention and cleanup of groundwater pollution.
• Drinking water projects for disadvantaged communities.
$1,420
$800
260
• Wastewater treatment in small communities.
260
• Local plans and projects to manage groundwater.
100
Flood Protection
$395
• Repairs and improvements to levees in the Delta.
$295
• Flood protection around the state.
Total
100
$7,545
20
A Decade of Regional Investment
Regional Diversity Requires Regional Solutions
21
Long Term Water Management
Observations and Lessons Learned

Solutions must be regionally based

Need to shift away from single-strategy approach toward “all
of the above” approach

Investment should reflect water priorities

Interconnected systems require integrated solutions

The most predictable aspect of California water is
unpredictability
22
Final Thought
How we plan is just as important as what we plan for
23
Questions &
Comments
Paul Massera
Statewide Integrated Water Mgmt.
CA Department Water Resources
[email protected]
24

similar documents