The early days of satellite

Report
Presented by Platco in Partnership with SES
Web: www.openviewhd.co.za
SES Web: www.africa.ses.com
Installers Web: www.ovhdinstallers.co.za
Platco Digital (PTY) Ltd
Wedgewood Office Park, Block D,
No 3 Muswell Road South
Bryanston, Johannesburg 2191
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Welcome
Introduction/Overview
Theory
Test
STB demos/discussion:
• Ellies
• Switch
• Space TV
6. Activation process
7. Incentive program
8. Practical
5 Minutes
5 Minutes
90 Minutes
10 Minutes
20 Minutes
10 Minutes
10 Minutes
5 Minutes
10 Minutes
15 Minutes
OpenView HD Overview
Platco Digital – Brings you Openview HD
South African consumers will soon have more to choose from when
it comes to digital television.
Platco Digital (Platco) will be launching OpenView HD, a free-to-view
direct to home (DTH) satellite offering on 15th October 2013.
OpenView HD will carry licensed free TV channels locally.
In any territory where it operates, Platco Digital will work with
licensed broadcasters to provide viewers access to channels licensed
to operate in those territories. Platco Digital will therefore always be
in compliance with national broadcasting laws and regulations.
Platco’s South African DTH platform, Openview HD, will not be
engaging in any licensable activities on its own behalf as it merely
provides technical platform services to licensed free-to-air
broadcasters on the basis of their existing licences.
OpenView HD Overview
Viewers wishing to access the OpenView HD offering will
need to purchase and install a satellite dish and set top
box from retail outlets as well as installers. Other than
these initial set-up costs, the offering of 16 channels at
launch will be free – making OpenView HD the first of its
kind in South Africa.
Platco Digital is owned by Sabido Investments (Pty) Limited,
the holding company of free-to-air broadcaster e.tv. It has
been established to provide solutions for multi-channel
carriage and distribution on DTH, digital terrestrial
television (DTT) and mobile TV in South Africa and in the
rest of Africa. Platco Digital has its offices in Bryanston,
Johannesburg and uplink facilities in Cape Town.
OpenView HD Overview
Platco Digital has entered into partnerships with a
range of companies including satellite provider
SES, leading conditional access vendor NDS as well
as set top box (STB) distributors, ABT, Ellies,
Space, Switch, and Telergy.
“One of our key brand values is partnerships, we
believe in building and maintaining strong and
sustainable relationships with all our business
partners and consumers, based on honesty,
integrity and trust,”
Authorised Installer Number
Once you - the installer, has
passed the test and practical,
you will be issued a unique
“Authorised Installer Number #”
This number will be issued today
Authorised Installer Number
This unique number will entitle the installer to the
following which will in turn be sent to you.
1. OVHD Identification Card & Lanyard
(1 per person)
2. Authorised OVHD installer set of Car magnet
(max 1 set per company )
3. OVHD dust coats
( max 2 per company )
4. OVHD T-Shirts
( 1 per person )
5. OVHD certificate
( 1 per person )
Presented by Platco in Partnership with SES
Web: www.openviewhd.co.za
SES Web: www.africa.ses.com
Installers Web: www.ovhdinstallers.co.za
Platco Digital (PTY) Ltd
Wedgewood Office Park, Block D,
No 3 Muswell Road South
Bryanston, Johannesburg 2191
The early days of satellite

•
•
In 1945 Arthur. C. Clarke,
proposed a satellite
communication system
± 36,000 Km above earth
appear to be standing still
Only in the early 1960’s
rockets were powerful enough
to launch satellites to this
orbit
Three main types of orbit for satellite communications:
1. Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO)
90% of the time, Geostationary Earth Orbit satellites will be the object of your attention:
They are a long way from earth (22,237 miles) but they appear stationary when seen
from the earth’s surface. A signal takes about a quarter of a second to do a round trip
from the earth to the satellite and then back to earth, so there is a noticeable voice delay
2. Non-Geostationary (NGEO)
3. Polar
GEO: Orbital slots:
The location of a satellite is called an
orbital slot
The orbital slot is measured in degrees
of longitude from the Greenwich
Meridian
SES-5 is based at 5 degrees east
Geo-stationary orbit
•
•
•
•
•
•
SES-5
Key data
Launch date – 10 July 2012
Lifespan – 15 years
36,000 Km from the earth
Above equator
Appears stationary
Orbits around earth at 15° per hour
at the same speed as the earth
Does not require tracking
Used mostly for DTH and VSAT
Orbital location
5°E
Total transponders
C-Band: 28 (36 MHz equivalent)
Ku-band: Africa: up to 24 out of 6 FSS (36
MHz) 24 BSS (33MHz) Nordic: up to 12 out
of 12 FSS (36 MHz), 7 BSS (33MHz)
Coverage area
Sub-Saharan Africa, Middle East and North
Africa, Europe, Atlantic Ocean Region
•
Uplink
Transmits the programmes to the
satellite
•
Satellite
Converts the uplink frequencies to
lower frequencies and amplifies them
before transmitting back to earth
•
TVRO
Receives the signals converts to a
lower frequency
•
Receiver
De-modulates signal and
decrypts for viewing on TV set
The domestic receive only television site
•
Refletor
Concentrates Ku-band Signals
•
LNB
Amplifies and down converts
signals
•
Satellite Receiver
De-Modulates and decrypts
signals
•
TV/Monitor
Displays the programs
Theoretical fundamentals
1. The volt (V)
• Electrical force or pressure
• Received satellite signals are small
• Use the millivolt (One thousandth of a volt)
• Use the microvolt (One millionth of a volt)
2. The Amp (I) & the Watt (W)
The amp can be regarded as the “volume” of
electricity in a wire or circuit
Figure 10a. Volt vs millivolt Figure 10b. Millivolt vs microvolt
The watt is the amount of power generated
when the volts and amps are multiplied
together.
P=IV
Watts is used for the power transmitted by
the satellite, but not for the signals received
as these are too small.
The footprint is rated in watts, but this relates
to the power transmitted from the satellite
Figure 12. The DC Waveform
Theoretical fundamentals
3. Alternating current – the sine wave
• The value varies between a positive and
equal negative value over time
• This is the type of waveform transmitted
to and from the satellite
Figure 11. The AC Waveform
4. Direct current
• The one port of the supply always stays
positive and the other always stays
negative
• Used for power and switching to the LNB
• Think of D.C. as the way a car battery
works
Figure 12. The DC Waveform
5. Frequency
• Number of cycles per second is known
as the frequency
Figure 13a. Frequency of 1HZ (one cycle per second)
Theoretical fundamentals
6. Frequency terminology
•
1 Hertz = 1 cycle per second
•
1,000 Hertz = 1 kilohertz =
1,000 cycles per second
•
1,000,000 Hertz = 1
megahertz = 1,000,000
cycles per second
•
1,000,000,000 Hertz = 1
gigahertz = 1,000,000,000
cycles per second
Figure 14. Frequency Spectrum
7. The frequency spectrum
•
All these frequencies are sine waves
•
It is only the number of oscillations per second that are
different
Theoretical fundamentals
The electromagnetic spectrum
Theoretical fundamentals
Satellite bands
•
L-band: exclusively reserved
for mobile satellite services
(MSS). Currently
Inmarsatand Globalstar, ICO
and others to follow.
•
C-band: fixed satellite
services (FSS) and television
broadcast (BSS). Mainly used
in areas of high rainfall,
Asia, Africa and Latin
America, due to its tolerance
to “rain fade”. Often used in
beams with widely dispersed
power, e.g. Global beams
•
Ku-band: FSS and BSS primarily
used in North America and Europe,
not least because it avoids
terrestrial C-band interference.
Often configured as high powered
spot beams
•
Ka-band: The path for broadband
services via satellite. Very
susceptible to atmospheric
attenuation. Commercial use is
small today, but many future
projects plan Ka-band systems
Theoretical fundamentals
Satellite band usage
Band
L
S
C
X
Ku
Ka
O/V
W
Frequencies
1.5 -1.6 GHz
2.5 GHz
4 – 6 GHz
7 – 8 GHz
10 – 14 GHz
20 – 30 GHz
37.5 – 40.5 GHz
71 -74 GHz
Spectrum Available
50 MHz
70MHz
500 MHz
30 MHz
2 GHz
2 GHz
3 GHz
3 GHz
Typical Applications
Mobile Satellite Communications
Mobile Satellite Communications
Trunk Telephony / data / DTH
Military / Feeder links
DTH / Data
Broadband Applications
Broadband Applications
Broadband Applications
8. The decibel (dB)
• 54 dBµV= 0.5 mV
• 60 dBµV= 1 mV
• 66 dBµV= 2 mV
• 57 dBµV= 0.7 mV
• 63 dBµV= 1.4 mV
• 72 dBµV= 4 mV
Voltages doubles with
every 6 dB increase in
signal
Remember this is how it reads on your field strength meter!
Theoretical fundamentals
Figure 15. Latitude and longitude
9. Lines of latitude & Longitude
•
The lines of latitude run parallel to
the equator
•
The lines of longitude run from the
North to the South poles and
converge at the poles
•
These lines decide the elevation,
azimuth and skew of every satellite
installation
Figure 15. Electro magnetic wave
10. The electromagnetic wave
•
All sine waves have a magnetic and electric
part at right angles to each other
•
The electrical part determines the polarization
Theoretical fundamentals
Figure 16. Analogue signal
11. The analogue waveform
•
•
The voltage level of this wave form
varies with time
This is the type wave form that is
transmitted to and from the
satellite
Figure 17. Digital signal
12. The digital signal
•
•
•
Figure 22. Noise and signal
Only has two values “1” or “0”
“1” can be any value
This is the form used for the television
signal that is modulated onto the satellite
frequency
Theoretical fundamentals
13. Bandwidth
•
The carrier without modulation is only
a sharp spike
•
When modulation is added, the signal
spreads on either side of the centre
frequency
•
The more information required, the
wider the bandwidth gets
•
Bandwidth is the limiting technical and
financial restraints in satellite
transmission
14. Atmospheric noise
•
This noise is created by small
molecules rubbing together in the
atmosphere
•
Cannot be seen or heard
•
Ground noise comes from the ground
•
The hotter and drier it is, the more
ground noise is available
NB! The satellite signal has to
travel through this noise!
15. Electronic noise
•
Every electronic circuit generates noise
•
The higher the gain, the more noise is
generated
•
This noise is also caused by molecular
movement
•
The noise figure (N.F.) on the side of the
LNB shows the amount of noise the LNB
generates
•
The lower this figure the better it is
Theoretical fundamentals
16. Rain fade
•
•
•
The rain drops are much larger than
the wave length of the Ku-band
signals
Some of the signal is absorbed in the
rain drops and the energy is lost in
heat as it warms the rain drops
17. Sun outages
•
The sun is the biggest generator of noise
•
In March and September the sun is directly
behind the satellite
•
The noise level is much higher than the signal
level
Some of the signal is reflected
Figure 23. Sun outage
Theoretical fundamentals
18. The satellite frequency groups
•
•
•
•
•
L-band
C-band down link
C-band up link
Ku-band down link
Ku-band up link
The L-band frequency is a much lower
frequency so that the signal can be
transmitted down the coax cable
If the signals at C-band and Ku-band
were transmitted down the coax cable
the signal losses would be too high
Theoretical fundamentals
19. C-band & Ku-band comparison
C-Band
• Minimal rain fade
• Reflectors are much larger
• Prone to terrestrial interference
• Lower frequency
Ku-band
• Suffers from rain fade
• Smaller reflectors required
• No terrestrial interference
• High frequency
Theoretical fundamentals
20. Satellite transmission power
•
Low power transponders
2,5 Watts per channel
•
Medium power transponders
55 Watts per channel
•
High power transponders
>110 Watts per channel
Polarization – H & V
•
This power is not enough and is increased by
the antenna gain (Effective isotropic radiated
power)
•
Typical E.I.R.P used across Africa can be 44
dBW (25120 watts)
Theoretical fundamentals
Figure 25. Vertical and horizontal signals
21. Polarization
•
Satellite transmission can re-use the
same frequencies but on two different
polarities
•
The polarity refers to the electrical part
of the signal
•
Polarity can be vertical, horizontal, right
hand circular or left hand circular
Figure 26. The difference between off-set and prime focus
22. What is a reflector?
Prime focus
•
Usually used for C-band
•
Signal blockage not that important due
to reflector size
Off-set
•
Usually used on Ku-band
•
No signal blockage
Theoretical fundamentals
23. Reflector size
•
•
The larger the reflector, the more of
the wave front can be intercepted
This means more gain focuses all the
signal onto the LNB
24. Factors affecting gain
•
•
•
•
The higher the frequency, the higher
the gain (A 2m reflector will have a
gain of 36 dB at C-band and 45 dB at
Ku-band)
The accuracy of the reflector surface
Over-illumination
Under-illumination
Theoretical fundamentals
Figure 28. Beam width
25. Beam width
•
•
This is defined as the angle between
the half power points
The larger the reflector, the smaller
the beam width
The smaller the beam width, the harder
to find the signal but the higher the
signal level
Figure 29. Carrier to noise
26. Carrier to noise ratio
•
This is the ratio used to express the level
of the signal to the level of the noise
•
The better this level, the better the
reception
•
When the ratio is low the receiver cannot
discriminate between the signal and the
noise
Theoretical fundamentals
27. Symbol rate
•
The symbol rate can be defined
as the number of digital
“symbols” modulated onto a
carrier in one second
•
Dvb -s2 allows qpsk as well as higher order
modulation schemes including 8psk ; 16-apsk
; 32-apsk
•
With qpsk there are two digital
“bits ” per symbol
•
In a 36 MHZ transponder the rate is usually
27,5 million to 30 million symbols per second
•
With 8psk there are three digital
“bits ” per symbol
•
When the ratio is low, the receiver cannot
discriminate between the signal and the noise
28. Forward Error Correction – “FEC”
•
•

These refer to the extra bits
transmitted for correcting errors in
the signal received

There is a standard set of values
expressed as a fraction



1/2 = One
correction
2/3 = One
correction
3/4 = One
correction
5/6 = One
correction
7/8 = One
correction
of every two bits used for error
of every three bits used for error
of every four bits used for error
of every six bits is used for error
of every eight bits is used for error
The higher the carrier-to-noise ratio, the less error
correction bits are needed
Theoretical fundamentals
29. Bit error rate – “BER”
•
•
This read out shows the
proportional rate of incorrect bits
that are received in the bitstream
Bit-error rates (“ber ”) can be
measured before error correction
(pre-corrected) or after (postcorrected). Obviously the “ber ”
post correction will be better
Examples:
3 X 10-2 =
3 X 10-3 =
3 X 10-4 =
3 X 10-5 =
3 X 10-6 =
3 X 10-7 =
•
This is the term used in digital
transmission to reduce the
bandwidth requirements
This is achieved by only
transmitting the required
information as per scene changes
or the movement within a scene
incorrect bits per 100 bits
incorrect bits per 1,000 bits
incorrect bits per 10,000 bits
incorrect bits per 100,000 bits
incorrect bits per 1,000,000 bits
incorrect bits per 10,000,000 bits
31. The LNB
•
Acronym for “Low Noise Block Down
Convertor”
•
Situated in front of the reflector at the focal
point
•
Does not tune to single frequency but receives
a group of frequencies
•
Amplifies this group of frequencies to a high
level without introducing excessive noise
•
Converts this group of frequencies to a lower
frequency called L-band
30. Compression
•
3
3
3
3
3
3
Theoretical fundamentals
Figure 30. Front of LNB Feed Horn
32. The feed horn
Figure 31. LNB block diagram
33. LNB– principles of Operation
•
It is the tube in front of the LNB also
known as a “waveguide”
•
The switch selects between Vertical (13v) and
horizontal (18v) polarity
•
Contains the two probes (Antennas)
for the vertical and horizontal
polarization
•
The LNA “low noise amplifier” amplifies the
low Ku-band signal
•
The down convertor converts the Ku-band to
L-band
•
This is the only part of the
installation that can discriminate
between horizontal and vertical
polarization
Theoretical fundamentals
34. Workings of the down convertor
35. Types of LNB’s
When the 22KHz tone is selected, the
higher oscillator (10600 MHz) is
selected. When there is no 22KHz
tone, the lower oscillator (9750 MHz)
is selected
Single universal
This LNB has a single output that switches
between high band and low band, vertical and
horizontal
The oscillator frequency is
subtracted from the incoming Kuband frequency to provide an L-band
frequency. i.e.
11130 - 9750 = 1380 MHz
12562 - 10600 = 1962 MHz
The result falls within the L-band
(950–2150 MHz)
If the wrong oscillator is selected,
the resultant frequency falls outside
the L-band
Twin universal
This LNB has two outputs and each port
switches independently between horizontal,
vertical, high band and low band
Quad
This LNB has four ports that all switch
independently
Quattro
This LNB has four dedicated ports – high vert –
high hor – low vert – low hor
SAT-CR
This LNB has a SATCR output and 1 or 2 single
output/s
Theoretical fundamentals
36. Elevation and azimuth
•
The azimuth is the angle clockwise to the
right of north
•
The elevation is the angle above the horizon
37. The skew
Figure 32. The Skew
•
The skew aligns the two probes with the
electrical part of the received satellite signal
•
This gives maximum discrimination between
horizontal and vertical signals
•
Has to be done to provide the best BER and
C/N
Theoretical fundamentals
38. Decryption
Figure 33.
Theoretical fundamentals
39. The coaxial cable
•
40. Coaxial cable impedance
Centre conductor can be solid
Copper or copper clad steel – ”skin
effect”
•
Dielectric is usually air blown P.E.
foam
•
Shield is usually a combination of
aluminium foil and braid for cost
saving
•
Outer sheath is usually PVC, but has
to be P.E. for underground use
•
TV cable has an impedance of 75 ohm
•
This is written on the side of the cable
•
“D” and “d” play a big part in the calculation
•
Sharp bends and too small cable clips
compress the outer sheath and changes the
impedance
•
Has to be done to provide the best ber and
C/N
NB. Impedance changes causes mismatches and
mismatches cause signal losses, reflections and all
sorts of signal problems!
Theoretical fundamentals
41. Coaxial cable D.C. resistance
42. Coaxial cable signal loss
•
This is measured with a multimeter
•
All coaxial cables have a signal loss
•
A good cable should have a reading
between 15 and 20 ohm per 100m
•
The higher the frequency, the higher
the signal loss
•
Solid copper core has a lower D.C.
resistance than copper clad steel
•
•
When voltage is supplied to the LNB
a high D.C. Resistance causes a volt
drop
Use a cable with a loss of ± 30 dB per
100m at 2150 MHz
•
Avoid 75 ohm video cable (stranded
inner core) as this does not work at all
•
If the 18V (horizontal) is supplied to
the LNB the voltage at the LNB
might be too low and the LNB will
stay in vertical mode. Result = no
reception on “h”
43. Underground coaxial installation
•
•
•
Direct burial has armoured sheath
Other underground coax always in conduit
PVC absorbs moisture – causes signal loss
Practical Installation
1. Dealing with the client
2. Basic test equipment
You are not only representing yourself
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pleasant telephone manners
Always return calls A.S.A.P.
Don’t argue with the subscriber
Arrive on time
Dress neatly
Speak to the subscriber courteously
Don’t lie
Field strength meter
(Minimum requirements signal level
indication, carrier to noise, pre and post bit
error correction and spectrum analyser)
Multimeter (for voltage and continuity checks)
Compass (to indicate azimuth)
Inclinometer (to indicate elevation)
Remember 1st impressions count!
Practical Installation
3. Basic tool set
•
•
•
•
•
Hammer / electric drill with
masonry and steel bits
Side cutter
Glue gun
Amalgamating tape
Fish tape
•
•
•
•
•
4. Reception equipment
Set of ring and flat
spanners
Knife
Spirit level
Short and long ladder
Adjustable spanner
•
•
•
•
•
Set of star and flat
screw drivers
Long nose pliers
Plumb line
Hammer
Extension lead
5. Selecting the installation position
•
Use the correct size reflector for
your country as specified
•
A smaller reflector will provide a
•
useable signal but will not be reliable
and cause premature loss of signal
•
Try and find a place at the back or side of the
building to install the dish
•
Avoid a line of sight to the satellite that has a
tree or other obstacle in the way
•
If there is no other installation area, first
discuss this with the client
•
Find the azimuth, elevation and skew from the
city tables
Do not install the dish at the front close to
front door
Practical Installation
6. Setting polarisation offset
(“LNB skew”)
•
•
Check the city tables for the
polarization offset (“LNB
skew”)
Don’t forget to do final skew
adjustment for best “BER”
when antenna has been
aligned!
7. Selecting the installation Position
•
Ensure that there are no
obstructions in the signal path
•
Remember that the received signals
are weak, and will not provide good
results when there are obstructions!
Practical Installation
Figure 36. Bracket with spirit level
Figure 35b. Right! Clear signal
8. Selecting the installation position
•
Clear path with no obstruction
10. Installing the mounting bracket
•
Drill one hole and fit the bracket to the
wall
•
Place the spirit level on the side of the
bracket, move until vertical and mark the
other three holes
•
Drill the three remaining holes and fit the
bolts
•
Tighten the bracket securely
•
The bracket must be tight as any
movement will cause signal loss
especially in windy conditions!
9. Installing the mounting bracket
•
•
•
•
•
•
Spirit level
4 X wall plugs and bolts
Hammer
Correct size masonry drill bit
Hammer drill
It is important that this bracket be
installed vertically as it looks neat and
allows for correct antenna alignment!
Practical Installation
11. Aligning the satellite antenna
Step one
•
Assemble the antenna according to the
manufacturer’s instructions
Step five
•
Connect your field strength meter and
cable to the LNB
Step two
•
Refer to attached elevation appendix and
set the elevation marked on the side of the
antenna to the approximate elevation
setting
•
Do not over tighten the bolts, but allow for
some movement!
Step six
•
Set your field strength meter to the
parameters found in the installation spec
Step three
•
Set the skew on the LNB to the value for
your city per the city tables
Step four
•
Mount the antenna on the mounting
bracket and tighten the mounting bolts,
but not too tight as the antenna still needs
to be moved on the pole
Step seven
•
Select the spectrum facility or signal level
reading on the field strength meter
•
Ensure that the elevation adjustment is set
on the side of the antenna
•
Use a compass to obtain the approximate
azimuth
•
Move antenna slowly left and right until a
peak signal is found
•
If not, adjust elevation up or down and
repeat the process
Practical Installation
11. Aligning the satellite antenna
12. Setting the skew
Step eight
•
When a peak is found, move the antenna
slowly up and down and left and right until
you are satisfied that the antenna is
peaked
•
Tighten all the bolts on the antenna
This is the only way of choosing between
vertical and horizontal!
Step nine
•
Now use the field strength meter to read
the C/N the pre- and post BER and the
signal level. Write this down for future
reference
Step ten
•
In areas of high elevation, pour a cup of
water into the reflector
•
If some of the water remains, then drill a
5mm hole in the antenna
•
Paint this hole with rust proofing
afterwards
•
Use the spectrum facility on the field
strength meter, choose 13V for vertical
and rotate lnb until spectrum is at its
lowest or use the ber reading on the
meter and rotate lnb until the pre-ber is
at its best or look at the signal quality
reading on the decoder
•
Rotate the LNB for the best reading
This is very important!
Practical Installation
Satellite parameters:
Satellite
SES-5
Orbital location
5°E
Satellite manufacturer
Space Systems Loral
Uplink frequency Ku-band: Africa: 14.5 – 14.8 GHz
Uplink frequency Ku-band: Africa: 17.3 – 18.1 GHz
Downlink frequency Ku-band: Africa: 11.7 – 12.5 GHz
Practical Installation
13. The cable installation
•
•
•
•
•
•
Use a long masonry drill that can go straight through the wall
Use a vacuum cleaner or tape a bag under the hole that is being drilled
Make sure there are no water pipes or electrical conduits in the wall
Do not press too hard on the drill
Fill the hole around the cable with filler once the cable is installed
Only use a good quality 75 ohm 7mm cable. A good cable has a signal loss of ±30dB
per 100m at 2 GHz
14. Cable installation
•
Placing bag or vacuum cleaner under the hole
Figure 37. Vacuum or bag placement for drilling
Practical Installation
15. Cable installation – outside wall
Use a plumb bob for installing the cable vertically on a wall
Use a spirit level to draw horizontal lines to install cable horizontally
•
•
Figure 38b. Using a spirit level for horizontal cable
16. Cable installation – inside wall
•
•
•
•
•
Figure 38a. The plumb line
Do not install the cable in the middle of the wall
Install the cable on the skirting board or in the corners of the room
Use a hot glue gun or Sestic Glue instead of cable clips wherever possible
Do not bend the cable sharply as this causes mismatches!
Only use the correctly sized cable clips as small cable clips compress the
cable and cause mismatches!
Practical Installation
Figure 39a. Coax cutting measurements
Figure 39b. Coax cutting measurements
17. The F connectors
•
These are the approximate cutting dimensions
•
Twist the braid to one side as modern cables have a small
amount of braid and this provides some strength
•
Cut the cable with a knife or a special cutting tool
Practical Installation
Figure 39c. F connector centre core
Figure 40. Earthing
18. The F connector
•
Fit only the right size connector
•
Compression or crimp type
connectors may be used but require
the correct tools
•
The centre core only needs to
protrude by 1 mm
19. Earthing
Must be done in accordance with the local
laws and regulations
Diagram shows a simple method
Earthing must always be done
•
•
•
20. Installing the decoder
•
•
•
•
•
•
Connect satellite cable to LNB in on the back
of decoder
Connect the AV leads and RF cable from
decoder to TV set
Insert batteries into remote control
Ensure that the smartcard is in the slot
Switch on decoder and TV set
Select the installation “menu” on the decoder
remote and configure the necessary
parameters for signal reception
Practical Installation
21. Signal scan
•
•
•
Perform signal scan via the menu
When completed, note the signal strength and signal quality values and note them on the
installation form
Make sure that these values are higher than the minimum “pass / fail” specification. If
not, you need to re-optimise the antenna adjustments (“azimuth”, “elevation” and
“skew”), until the decoder passes the required signal quality level
Before doing anything else, perform a “forced download” to ensure that the decoder
has the latest software parameters for signal reception
Finishing off
•
•
•
•
Activate the set top box.
Dial *120*OVHD#
*120*6843#
Follow the on-screen prompts.
Make sure the set top box is activated before leaving.
Clean up your mess!
Programming
They are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SABC 1
SABC 2
SABC 3
E-tv (HD)
eKasi+
eAfrika+
eMovies+
Zest TV
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ASTV
Deen TV
eToons+
Mindset Learning
Davinci Learning
English club (education)
Spirit Word
Inspiration TV

similar documents