Institutional Repositories, by Charl Roberts, University of the

Report
Institutional Repositories
Charl Roberts
University of the Witwatersrand
[email protected]
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
What will we cover?
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What is a repository?
Why be Open?
Buy in
Some important questions
Copyright
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
What is a repository?
A digital repository is a mechanism for managing and
storing digital content. Repositories can be subject or
institutional in their focus. Putting content into an
institutional repository enables staff and institutions to
manage and preserve it, and therefore derive maximum
value from it. A repository can support research,
learning, and administrative processes. Repositories use
open standards to ensure that the content they contain is
accessible in that it can be searched and retrieved for
later use. The use of these agreed international
standards allows mechanisms to be set up which import,
export, identify, store and retrieve the digital content
within the repository.
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
What can go into a repository?
Digital repositories may include a wide range of content for a
variety of purposes and users. What goes into a repository is
currently less an issue of technological or software ability, and
more a policy decision made by each institution or
administrator. Typically content can include research outputs
such as journal articles or research data, e-theses, e-learning
objects and teaching materials, and administrative data.
Some repositories only take in particular items (such as theses
or journal papers), whilst others seek to gather any credible
scholarly work produced by the institution; limited only by
each author's retained rights from publishers. However, some
more complex objects (websites, advanced learning objects,
3D topographical representations and other data sets) do
present a technological challenge.
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
Open Access
The open access tag refers to the free
availability of their contents to all. Thus there
is, or should be, no subscription or registration
required to read papers within them.
Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online,
free of charge, and free of most copyright and
licensing restrictions.
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
Why be Open, what are the benefits?
Benefits for the Researcher:
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Increased visibility of research output and consequently the department and the institution
Potentially increased impact of your publications by you as an author at the institution. Research
made freely available can be disseminated more widely and have greater impact. Work done on
citation analysis has demonstrated that research that is made freely available is going to be easier
to cite
In fast moving subjects such as Electronics, researchers can make preprints (as opposed to peer
reviewed papers) available via a repository, to establish that they were first and to get feedback
Helps you manage and store digital content connected with your research, including the
underlying research data
Helps researchers manage the likely requirements of funding bodies for publications to be made
available in a repository.
Provides the possibility to standardise institutional records e.g. Academic's CVs and published
papers
Allows the creation of personalised publications lists
Offers usage metrics so researchers can determine hit rates on specific papers
Creates the potential to undertake citation analysis through following links to papers held in other
repositories.
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
Why be Open, what are the benefits?
Benefits for the institution:
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A repository can interoperate with other university systems and maximise efficiencies between
them by sharing information
Increases visibility and prestige of institution (depending on content contained)
Repository content is readily searchable both locally and globally
Allows an institution to manage their intellectual property rights by raising awareness of copyright
issues and facilitating the recording of relevant rights information
A repository that contains high quality content could be used as 'shop window' or marketing tool
to entice staff, students and funding
Repository can store other types of content that isn't necessarily published, sometimes known as
'grey literature'
Learning and teaching materials previously locked away in Virtual Learning Environments for
specific courses could be stored centrally to increase the potential reuse, repurposing and sharing
of the materials
Repositories could provide cost savings in the long run provided that a significant amount of
content is deposited in them
Offers greater flexibility over websites with better security and preservation of various kinds of
digital materials through the collection of standardised metadata about each item.
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
Why be Open, what are the benefits?
Benefits for the global community:
• Assists research collaboration through
facilitating free exchange of scholarly
information
• Aids in the public understanding of research
endeavours and activities.
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
Getting buy in
Cultural change is classically commonly brought about
through engagement with academics on one of three
levels:
• Intellectual (conceptual, logical, the greater good)
• Emotional (hearts and minds, enlightened self-interest)
• Political (necessitation, external drivers, compliance
with policy)
Does not happen overnight…
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
Some important questions to ask at
the offset
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What is an institutional repository and what does it mean to you?
Have you outlined and documented the purpose and drivers for institutional repository establishment in your institution?
Have you defined your vision and initial goals?
Have you decided how to position your institutional repository within your wider information environment?
What is the target content of the repository? This could include research papers and data, electronic theses, as well as
teaching and learning resources.
Have you completed a stakeholder analysis? Stakeholders are those people with a vested interest in how the repository
represents the institution, and themselves, to the world. In the case of an institutional repository, stakeholders will include
senior institutional managers, departmental leaders, and those who are expected to contribute content.
Do you have an institution wide IPR policy?
Have you done a risk assessment?
Considering the type of content your institutional repository will contain have you consulted your academic community to
explore their current practice and method of dealing with these materials?
Do any of your Departments already have a repository or other digital stores of publications? How will you manage
duplication, transfer of resources and metadata, and, perhaps, the closure of the Departmental repository?
Does your institution have an information management strategy?
Have you identified and briefed your project champion - a senior member of staff who will support your institutional
repository project?
Have you established an institutionally representative working group?
Have you identified extant skills and personnel within the institution to call upon for advice and input? And have you let
them know what you are planning?
Have you defined roles and responsibilities for your institutional repository development?
Have you made financial arrangements to support institutional repository work in the short/medium/long term?
What sort of statistics and management reports will you want from your institutional repository?
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
Copyright
• Authors addendum
– Wits example
• Romeo / Sherpa
(http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/)
• Wits Juta example
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk
Questions
Source: Repositories Support Project (JISC)
http://www.rsp.ac.uk

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