General Electric EV Infrastructure Solution

Report
GE EV Infrastructure Solutions
Dec 8th 2010
Electric Vehicle
Infrastructure
Electric Vehicles are Coming …
OEM
Collection
Fuel Production
Fueling Location
Data
Gasoline
Electric
EV Tax
Credits
Prius,
Focus
Escalade,
Leaf, Volt
Caravan
150K+ EVs built in
U.S. (Ford, GM,
Nissan)
25% of new
vehicles electric*
Electric Vehicle
Timeline
2010
2015
2020
2025
* - Needed to achieve Electrification Coalition goal of 75% electric miles by 2040
90% of new
vehicles electric
by 2030*
Electric Vehicle Sales, United Sales: 2010-2015
Source: Pike Research
For every EV sold, we expect there will be 1.5 charging stations
…
… one in every home and the rest for use in public applications.
3 Key Drivers for EV Growth
1. Government Funding and Incentives
2. Auto Manufacturer EV Pipeline
3. The Environmental Consumer
#1 Federal Government Activity
1. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Funding – $2.4B for
manufacturing and infrastructure
• $1.5B for US-based manufacturers to produce batteries and EV components
• $500MM to produce other EV components like motors
• $400MM to demonstrate and evaluate PHEV and related infrastructure
2. Auto Manufacturer Incentives - $8B loans for Advanced Vehicle Technologies
• $5.9B to Ford (factories in Ohio, Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio)
• $1.6B to Nissan (factory in Tennessee)
• $465MM to Telsa (factory in California)
3. Fuel Efficient Vehicles Tax Incentives for Consumers
• Tax credit for EV’s, up to $7,500
• Tax credit for charging stations up to $2,000 for consumers
and $50,000 for public charging or 50% of the cost
• Final guidance is pending the issuance of EV regulations
#2 Auto Manufacturer Activity
Battery Electric Vehicles
(BEV):
2010 Coda Automotive Sedan
2010 Mitsubishi iMiEV BEV
2010 Nissan LEAF
2010 Ford Battery Electric Van
2010 Tesla Roadster Sport EV
2010 Chevy Volt Extended Range EV
2011 Peugeot Urban EV*
2011 Renault Kangoo Z.E.
2011 Renault Fluence Z.E.
2011 Tesla Model S
2011 BYD e6 Electric Vehicle
2011 Ford Battery Electric Small Car
2011 Opel Ampera Extended Range*
2012 Fiat 500 minicar
2012 Renault City Car*
2012 Renault Urban EV*
2012 Audi e-tron
2013 Volkswagen E-Up*
2016 Tesla EV
Source: www.electricdrive.org
*European Launch
Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV):
2010 Lexus HS 250h
2010 Mercedes E Class Hybrid
2010 Porsche Cayenne S Hybrid
2010 Toyota Camry Hybrid
2010 Toyota Prius Hybrid
2011 Audi A8 Hybrid (likely introduction)
2011 BMW 5-Series ActiveHybrid
2011 Honda CR-Z sport hybrid coupe
2011 Lexus CT 200h Hybrid Hatchback
2011 Peugeot Diesel Hybrid*
2011 Suzuki Kizashi Hybrid
2011 Audi Q5 Crossover Hybrid
2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid
2011 Infiniti M35 Hybrid
2014 Ferrari Hybrid
#2 Auto Manufacturer Launch Cities
Nissan Leaf
GM/Chevy Volt
Toyota Plug-In Prius
BMW Mini E
Source: auto manufacturer web sites & press releases
#3 The Environmental Consumer
GE research identified three key themes driving consumer
interest in Electric Vehicles:
1. The emergence of the Hybrid/Electric tag as a
status symbol
2. The personal desire for fuel efficiency
3. ‘Voting with your wallet’ – the desire to express
your own personal politics through vehicle choice
#3 The 3 Core Consumer Mindsets
•
Environmentally
Conscious
For this consumer, an EV at the right price
point and form factor will be an obvious
investment. They see the benefits and
consider themselves part of the
environmental movement: driving an EV will
demonstrate that commitment.
47%
•
The innovative design,
fast charging, and cool
display will entice these
drivers - they'll be
intrigued by electric cars
as a technology item first
and foremost, so design
cues and feature sets
that reference other high
tech brands will stand
out.
•
Technology
and Car Driven
Frugal
Travelers
47%
35%
•
Political Arguments
Regardless of need, everyone wants to see America’s
dependence on oil (particularly foreign oil) reduced.
These consumers are driven more by
the money that comes out of their
wallets. While some are concerned
about the total cost of ownership, the
main pain point is how much they pay
at the pump each visit. Reducing
those charges by 2/3s is highly
compelling.
Consumer Choices for Charging Location
Definitely use it here
GE research concluded consumers gravitate towards locations where
their vehicles will be parked for extended periods of time. Hotels were
one of the most desirable charging locations.
Cost of charging an EV
BEV battery capacity
Nissan LEAF
GM Volt
CODA sedan
Tesla model S
Level 1 … 120Vac, 24A
Charge
time
(hrs)
Total
kWh
% of
capacity
(LEAF)
Retail
electricity
cost*
1
2.9
12%
$0.35
2
5.8
24%
$0.69
3
8.6
36%
24kWh
16kWh
34kWh
56kWh
Level 2 … 240Vac, 30A
Charge
time
(hrs)
Total
kWh
% of
capacity
(LEAF)
Retail
electricity
cost*
1
6.6
28%
$0.80
2
13.3
55%
$1.60
3
20.0
83%
$2.40
4
26.6
100%
$3.19
$1.04
4
11.5
48%
$1.38
5
14.4
60%
$1.73
6
17.3
72%
$2.07
7
20.2
84%
$2.42
8
23.0
96%
$2.76
9
25.9
100%
$3.11
* at avg retail rate of $0.12kWh
Retail electricity cost is ~$3 per full charge
Business Models
1. Free Charging – offer the service for free
2. Membership/Rewards Access – Preferred customer access, ability to acquire
data
3. Pay for Parking
Level 2 … 240Vac, 30A
Pay for Parking Business model
Total
$
Charge
time
(hrs)
kWh
% of
capacity
(LEAF)
Retail
electricity
cost*
$5.00
$4.20
1
6.6
28%
$0.80
$1.60
$10.00
$8.40
2
13.3
55%
$1.60
3
$2.40
$15.00
$12.60
3
20.0
83%
$2.40
4
$3.19
$20.00
$16.81
4
26.6
100%
$3.19
5
$4.00
$25.00
$21.00
8
$12.00
$40.00
$28.00
12
$18.00
$60.00
$42.00
Charge
time
(hrs)
Cost
Revenue
Profit
$
$
1
$0.80
2
GE offerings
- Provide hardware
- Turnkey – Hardware & Install
- Long term maintenance agreement
- GE Capital financing or lease agreement
•at avg retail rate of $0.12kWh
GE’s EV Infrastructure Solutions
GE Brand Appeal
Most Valuable Global Brands
2010
Rank
Brand
Value
($M)
1
$70,452
2
$64,727
3
$60,895
4
$43,557
5
$42,808
6
$33,578
7
$32,015
8
$29,495
Source: Interbrand, 2010
– Homeowners know the GE
brand better than any other
electrical products brand
– Consumers trust GE
GE Infrastructure
Global unit sales
Chargin
g
Stations
Electric
Vehicles
2,400
Units in thousands
Battery cost curve
2,000
1,600
High
cost
1,200
Medium
cos
t
Low
cost
800
400
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2006
2015
2010
2015
2020
2025
2030
Source: McKinsey.
Source: Pike Report
July 2010
GE uniquely positioned with complete solution
J1772
Controller (IS)
GE Nucleus
(GEA)
POS Systems
(IS)
Driver
Services
(IS)
Smart
Grid Coms
(DE)
Distribution
Equipment (IS)
EV Charging
Hardware (IS)
EV Sub-systems
Turnkey
Installation (IS)
EV Services
Product Overview
Electric Vehicles
• Battery Electric Vehicle … Ex Nissan Leaf
•
•
•
•
One energy storage system – battery
No primary on-board means of generating electricity to charge battery
Plug in to electrical source or exchange battery
100 mile targeted range – late 2010
• Plug-in Hybrid-Electric Vehicle … Ex Chevy Volt
•
•
•
•
One energy storage system – battery
On-board means of generating electricity to charge battery
Plug in to electrical source
40 mile targeted range
• Hybrid-Electric Vehicle … Ex Toyota Prius
• Two or more energy storage systems
• On-board means of generating electricity to charge battery
• ‘Short’ distances or support the main engine
Electric Vehicle Terminology
Terminology
EVSE: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment
PHEV: Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles
BEV: Battery Electric Vehicles
EV: Electric Vehicles – generic name for PHEV & BEV
Example: Nissan Leaf
-24 kWh battery
-100 mile range
-Level 1 = 20 hours
-Level 2 = 8 hours
-Level 3 = 30 mins
Source: NissanUSA web site
Typical EV battery
24kW
• Level 1 (Slow Charging AC)
• compatible with the most commonly available grounded
electrical outlet
• US: max 15A @120VAC => 15-20 hours
• Europe: max 16A @ 230VAC => 6-8 hours
Charge Time (approx)
• Level 2 / Mode 3 (Fast Charging AC)
20
• US: max 80A @ 208-240VAC => 4-8 hours
• Europe: max 32 @ 380VAC => 1 hours
• Level 3 (Ultrafast DC charging)
US
• Typical charge time: 15 - 30 minutes
Europe
Hours
15
10
5
• Note: actual charge time depends on a number of factors
0
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Introducing the GE EV Charging Station
Product Overview
Pedestal
Wall
•Level II Charging
•Charge time: 4-8 hours ,
assuming 24kWh battery and
full cycle charge
•208-240VAC at 40A
•4 mounting options:
• Single pedestal
• Double pedestal
• Wall Mount
• Pole Mount (wall design
with pole mounting
brackets)
•Modular design
GE EV Charging Station… a closer look at the Pedestal
Option
What’s inside?
Controller
-Provides user with charger status and
messages via LED Bar, Vacuum Fluorescent
Display, or external communications
-Allows user configurable overload protection
-Performs CCID20 ground fault protection per
UL 2231
-Provides single phase metering
Contactor
-Responsible for energizing and de-energizing
of EVSE connector
-Operates in conjunction with controller to meet
UL and NEC requirements
LED Bar Charger Status
VFD Screen
RFID (optional)
Plug Holder
Power Cord Holder
Connector
-Compliant with SAE J1772 standard
-UL listed for EVSE applications
Fuses
Access Panel (on side)
-Provides overload and short circuit protection
Mounting Options
-Single Pedestal (shown)
-Double pedestal with a back to back
design and 2 plugs
Base to accept power
and fasten to concrete
GE EV Charging Station Specification
GE EV Charging Station will be a modular design that can be upgraded
as new technology arrives and customer needs change
Basic:
1. Supply Needs: 208-240VAC @ 30A with 40A overload (2 pole)
2. GF Protection with Ground Monitor (UL 2231)
3. Charger & Vehicle Communication (NEC 625)
- Connection Interlock
- Personnel Protection
- Automatic De-Energizing Device
- Ventilation Interlock
4. Connection for SAE J1772 Plug & Cord
5. LED Lights & Display
6. Indoor & Outdoor Enclosure (NEMA 3R)
Commerce Options:
Card Reader, Card Swipe for Credit Cards
Communication Options:
Open Network Communications – Ethernet CAT5, RS485, RS232
GE WattStation
Available April ‘11
GE EV Charging Station RFID Option
GE EV Charging Station offers the option for Radio Frequency
Identification (RFID) to control user access
Details:
•Control and restrict driver access with the RFID option
•Driver just waves authorized RFID card in front of the reader
and is able to start charging
•Ethernet network offered to support RFID service
Software:
•Local desktop application that runs on a Windows Operating
System
•Secure software application enables the owner/operator to
add, remove, suspend authorized drivers
•Supplies reports on EV Charging Station usage and monitors
status of EVSE and RFID communication status
GE WattStation
Available April ‘11
U.S. Compliance and Standards
U.S. Electric Vehicle
Standards
•
UL 2594, for EVSE
•
UL 2231, the Standard for
Safety of Personnel
Protection Systems for EV
Supply Circuits
•
NEC Article 625, Electric
Vehicle Charging System
•
SAE (Society of Automotive
Engineers) J1772, Electric
Vehicle and Plug in Hybrid
Electric Vehicle Conductive
Charge Coupler
GE’s UL Expertise
•
•
•
•
Certified UL lab facilities for
witnessing and testing at
Industrial Solutions HQ in
Plainville, CT
UL lab capabilities include:
handling overload, endurance
and short circuit, EMI testing,
material and environmental
analysis
GE Industrial Solutions has over
3,000 unique catalog numbers
that are UL listed
UL collaborates with GE for
industry guidance in technology
and safety, and managing policy
and technical content
Market Outreach
GE is helping to overcome the barriers to
adoption and educate stakeholders
GE WattStation TV Commercial – “Road Trip”
GE Show featured on GE.com
GE Accelerates EV Adoption
GE Announced Largest-ever single EV commitment
•
•
•
•
•
Deployment of 25,000 EVs by 2015
Initial purchase of 12,000 GM Vehicles
(starting with the Volt)
GE will convert at least half its 30,000 global
fleet
Partnering with Fleet customers to further
deployment
Leveraging EV infrastructure expertise to
provide supporting solutions
EVs are hitting the highways and the need
for infrastructure is growing coast to coast

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