Summer PD - TDQ

Report
Text Dependent
Questions
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
English Language Arts Department
Text-Dependent Questions
and Evidence-Based Answers
Participants will
understand how to
create text-dependent
questions using a
complex text.
Defining Text-Dependent Questions
by Christina Hank
How does Christina Hank define
text-dependent questions?
How do we recognize a good
text-dependent question?
Why does Christina say we need
to engage in a “different kind of
planning”?
How has Christina’s
questioning changed?
What Can a Small Bird Be?
by the Character Education Teen Residency Project Participants
Text-dependent Questions
Demonstration
The text begins with: There once
was a curious bird who wondered,
What can a small bird be? Why do
you think the authors chose to begin
the text with this question?
Text-dependent Questions
Demonstration
What is the meaning of “courage”
and how does Tortoise demonstrate
“courage” in this text?
Text-dependent Questions
Demonstration
What evidence is there that shows
Bird is wondering, “What can a small
bird be?” and working on a solution?
Evidenced-Based Answers
Text-based evidence facilitates rich and rigorous
evidence-based discussions and writing through
specific, thought-provoking questions about
common texts (including, when applicable,
illustrations, charts, diagrams, audio/visual, and
media).
Matching Activity
Directions:
Blue cards: Sort the QUESTIONS (blue cards)
into two categories: examples and nonexamples.
Non-examples
Did you sort out these
non-examples?
Have you ever been bullied?
The Bird says to Tortoise, “And you showed yourself,
too.” Describe a time when you showed yourself you
could do something.
The Tortoise demonstrates courage with Bird’s help.
Why is courage an important character trait to have?
Red cards:
Align the STANDARDS (red cards)
with the QUESTIONS (blue cards).
Question
Standard(s) Addressed
What does the word surfaced mean in this
text? Why do you think the authors chose
this word?
L.6.4
Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and
multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 6
reading and content, choose flexibly from a range of
strategies.
a. Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or
phrase.
The text begins with: There once was a
curious bird who wondered, What can a
small bird be? Why do you think the authors
chose to begin the text with this question?
RL.6.5
Analyze how a particular sentence, chapter, scene, or
stanza fits into the overall structure of a text and
contributes to the development of the theme, setting, or
plot.
What is the meaning of courage? How does
Tortoise demonstrate courage in this text?
RL.6.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are
used in a text, including figurative and connotative
meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on
meaning and tone.
RL.6.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is
conveyed through particular details; provide a summary
of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
Question
Standard(s) Addressed
What evidence is there that shows Bird
is wondering, “What can a small bird
be?” and working on a solution?
RL.6.3
Describe how a particular story’s or
dramas plot unfolds in a series of
episodes as well as how the characters
respond or change as the plot moves
toward a resolution.
What evidence shows that the crows are
bullying the Tortoise? What is Bird’s
response?
RL.6.1
Cite textual evidence to support analysis
of what the text says explicitly as well as
inferences drawn from the text.
What words or phrases does the author
choose to persuade you that the crows
are bullies?
RL.6.5
Analyze how a particular sentence,
chapter, scene, or stanza fits into the
overall structure of a text and contributes
to the development of the theme, setting,
or plot.
Let’s Practice
Creating Text-Dependent
Questions
Sample Text-Dependent Questions
Question Type
Questions from Frog and
Toad Together (Lobel,
1997) – 1st grade
Questions from Chapter 10
in A Night to Remember
(Lord, 1955) – 6th grade
General Understandings
Retell the story using first, next,
then, and finally.
Why would the author title the
chapter “Go Away”?
Key Details
What ways did they try to solve the
problem of eating too many
cookies?
What are two things that could
have prevented this tragedy?
Vocabulary and Text Structure
How did the author help us to
understand what willpower means?
How does the chronological
structure help the reader
understand the events?
Author’s Purpose
Who tells the story?
Whose story is most represented
and whose story is underrepresented?
Inferences
Do you think Toad’s actions caused
the seeds to grow?
Why would Mrs. Brown run lifeboat
number 6 with a revolver?
Opinions, Arguments, Intertextual
Connections
In your opinion, is Frog a good
friend to Toad? Do you think this is
a happy story or a sad one?
Compare this book with [Ken
Marschall’s] Inside the Titanic.
What are the similarities and
differences?

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