2013 Sample 3 rd Grade Question

Report
2012-2013 Common Core Aligned
NY State Math and ELA Tests
(Grades 3-5)
What are the Common Core Standards?
-Designed to set clear expectations for what students in Pre-K through
12th across the country should know and be able to do in English
language arts and mathematics.
-Designed to ensure that students graduating from high school are
prepared to enter college programs or the workforce.
- Adopted by 45 states, the District of Colombia, four territories, and
the Department of Defense Education Activity.
-In academic year 2012-2013 all ELA and mathematics instructions
must be aligned to the Common Core in K-8.
- Grades 3-8 tests will be aligned to the CCLS starting in spring 2013.
ELA: April 16, 17, 18
Math: April 24th, 25th and 26th
Pedagogical Shifts Demanded by the Common Core Standards
Aligning to the Common Core
• Over the next several years, State tests will continue
changing to align with the Common Core standards:
– This year and next year, the content of the State tests in reading
and math will align with the new standards. Reading passages
will be harder, and math problems will involve multiple steps.
– But the format of the tests will be similar to past years: they will
include about the same number of multiple choice, short
answer, and essay questions.
– Two years from now, the plan is for the format of the State tests
to change too. Tests will start to include more writing, and more
complex and open-ended math problems.
– These new tests are in the process of being created by a group
of states, including New York, through an organization known as
the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and
Careers (PARCC).
3rd Grade Math: Critical Areas
Grade 3: In Grade 3, the CCLS focus on four critical
areas
(1) developing understanding of multiplication and
division within 100;
(2) developing understanding of fractions, especially
unit fractions (fractions with numerator 1);
(3) developing understanding of the structure of
rectangular arrays and area; and
(4) describing and analyzing two-dimensional shapes.
4th Grade Math: Critical Areas
Grade 4: In Grade 4, the CCLS focus on three critical areas
(1) developing understanding and fluency with multi-digit
multiplication, and developing understanding of dividing to
find quotients involving multi-digit dividends;
(2) developing an understanding of fraction equivalence,
addition and subtraction of fractions with like denominators,
and multiplication of fractions by whole numbers; and
(3) understanding that geometric figures can be analyzed and
classified based on their properties, such as having parallel
sides, perpendicular sides, particular angle measures, and
symmetry.
5th Grade Math: Critical Areas
Grade 5: In Grade 5, the CCLS focus on three critical areas
(1) developing fluency with addition and subtraction of
fractions, and developing understanding of multiplication of
fractions and of division of fractions in limited cases (unit
fractions divided by whole numbers and whole numbers
divided by unit fractions);
(2) extending division to 2-digit divisors, integrating decimal
fractions into the place value system and developing
understanding of operations with decimals to hundredths,
and developing fluency with whole number and decimal
operations; and
(3) developing understanding of volume.
Reading
To build a foundation for college and career readiness,
students:
• Must read widely and deeply from among a broad range of high-quality,
increasingly challenging literary and informational texts.
• Through extensive reading of stories, dramas, poems, and myths from
diverse cultures and different time periods, students gain literary and
cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and
elements
By reading texts in history/social studies, science, and other
disciplines, students:
• build a foundation of knowledge in these fields that will also give them the
background to be better readers in all content areas.
• Students can only gain this foundation when the curriculum is intentionally
and coherently structured to develop rich content knowledge within and
across grades. Students also acquire the habits of reading independently and
closely, which are essential to their future success
Writing
To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students
need to:
• learn to use writing as a way of offering and supporting opinions,
demonstrating an understanding of the subjects they are studying and
conveying real and imagined experiences and events
• learn to appreciate that a key purpose of writing is to communicate clearly to
an external, sometimes unfamiliar audience, and begin to adapt the form and
content of their writing
• develop the capacity to build knowledge on a subject through research
projects and to respond analytically to literary and informational sources
To meet these goals students must devote significant time and effort to writing,
producing numerous pieces over short and extended time frames throughout the
year.
Language
To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students:
• Must gain control over many conventions of standard English grammar, usage,
and mechanics, as well as learn other ways to use language to convey meaning
effectively;
• Must also be able to determine or clarify the meaning of grade-appropriate
words encountered through listening, reading, and media use
• Come to appreciate that words have non-literal meanings, shadings of
meaning, and relationships to other words, and expand their vocabulary in the
course of studying content (Shift 6: Academic Vocabulary).
Math Test Focus Areas
3rd, 4th, 5th Grade ELA Focus Area
The chart below shows the percentage of points that relate to
Reading, Language, and Writing Standards. When reading
these charts, it is essential to remember that most questions
assess many standards simultaneously. Additionally, Reading
Standards are divided by focus to help guide instruction.
Area of Focus
Approximate Percentage of Points
Reading Standards (RL and RI)
100% of points require close reading
Language and Writing Standards
Up to 45% of points require writing and command
of language
Approximate Percent of Reading Points
Key Ideas and Details
Craft and
Structure
Integration of Knowledge and
Ideas
Up to 65%
Up to 35%
Up to 30%
Math Test Design
English Language Arts Test Design
Grades 3, 4 and 5
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
Book1
Book2
Book 3
Book 4
Total
Passages
5
1
2
3
11
Multiple-Choice
Questions
30
7
37
Short- Response
Questions
3
5
8
Extended –
Response
Questions
1
1
2
Total Number of Literary Passages
4-7
Total Number of Informational Passages
4-7
Estimated Time on Math Test
3rd Grade
Book
Day
Administered
Estimated
Time on Task
Time Allowed
1
1
*50 min.
70 min
2
2
*50 min.
70 min
3
3
*50 min.
70 min
4th Grade
Book
Day
Administered
Estimated
Time on Task
Time Allowed
1
1
*50 min.
70 min
2
2
*50 min.
70 min
3
3
*70 min.
90 min
5th Grade
Book
Day
Administered
Estimated
Time on Task
Time Allowed
1
1
*50 min.
90 min
2
2
*50 min.
90 min
3
3
*70 min.
90 min
Estimated time on ELA Test
3rd and 4th
Grade
Book
Day
Administered
Estimated
Time on Task
Time Allowed
1
1
*50 min.
70 min
2
2
*50 min.
70 min
3
*70 min.
90 min
5th Grade
Book
Day
Administered
Estimated
Time on Task
Time Allowed
1
1
*70 min.
90 min
2
2
*70 min.
90 min
3
*50 min.
90 min
3
4
3
4
Math Question Types
Multiple Choice
Designed to assess CCLS math standards and incorporate both standards and
math practices in real-world applications. Math multiple-choice questions
assess procedural and conceptual standards. Unlike questions on past math
assessments, many require the use of multiple skills and concepts. Answer
choices are also different from those on past assessments. Within the sample
questions, all distractors will be based on plausible missteps.
Short Constructed Response
Similar to past 2-point questions, asking students to complete a task and show
their work. Like multiple-choice questions, short constructed response
questions will often require multiple steps, the application of multiple math
skills, and real-world applications. Many of the short constructed response
questions will cover conceptual and application standards.
Extended Constructed Response
Similar to past 3-point questions, asking students to show their work in
completing two or more tasks or one more extensive problem. Extended
constructed response questions allow students to show their understanding of
math procedures, conceptual understanding, and application
Changes to NYSED Math Test: Assessing the Common Core
1. Increases in Rigor – Many of the questions on
the Common Core assessments are more
advanced and complex than those found on
prior assessments that measured prior gradelevel standards.
2. Depth of Math – Students will be expected to
understand math conceptually, use prerequisite
skills with grade-level math facts, and solve
real-world math problems, deciding for
themselves which formulas and tools (such as
protractors and rulers) to use.
Previous 3rd Grade Question
There are 27 students in Ms. Austin’s class. She
groups her class into 3 teams that have an equal
number of students. How many students are on
each team?
A
B
C
D
6
7
8
9
2013 Sample 3rd Grade Question
Two groups of students from Douglas Elementary School were
walking to the library when it began to rain. The 7 students in
Mr. Stern’s group shared the 3 large umbrellas they had with
Ms. Thorn’s group of 11 students. If the same number of
students were under each umbrella, how many students were
under each umbrella?
You may use the space below to draw a picture of the problem.
A
B
C
D
6
10
18
21
Previous 3rd Grade Question
2013 Sample 3rd Grade Question
Previous 4th Grade Question
2013 Sample 4th Grade Question
Previous 4th Grade Question
Ms. Upton spends a total of $42 for 3 sweaters for
her children. Each sweater costs the same amount.
How much does each sweater cost?
Show your work.
Answer $ ________________________
2013 Sample 4th Grade Question
Previous 5th Grade Question
2013 Sample 5th Grade Question
2013 Sample 5th Grade Question
ELA Question Format
Multiple-Choice
• Multiple-choice questions are designed to assess Common Core
Reading and Language Standards. They will ask students to analyze
different aspects of a given text, including central idea, style elements,
character and plot development, and vocabulary.
• Multiple-choice questions will assess Reading Standards in a range of
ways. Some will ask students to analyze aspects of text or vocabulary.
Many questions will require students to combine skills. For example,
questions may ask students to identify a segment of text that best
supports the central idea. To answer correctly, a student must first
comprehend the central idea and then show understanding of how
that idea is supported. Questions will require more than rote recall or
identification.
ELA Question Format
Short-Response
• Short-response questions are designed to assess Common Core
Reading and Language Standards. These are single questions in
which students will be required to provide textual evidence to
support their answer. These questions ask the student to make a
claim, take a position, or draw a conclusion, and then provide two
pieces of text-based evidence to support her answer.
• The purpose of the short-response questions is to assess a
student’s ability to comprehend and analyze text. In responding to
these questions, students will be expected to write in complete
sentences. Responses should require no more than three complete
sentences.
ELA Question Format
Extended-Response
• Extended-response questions are designed to assess Writing from
Sources. They will focus primarily on Common Core Writing Standards.
Extended-response questions will require comprehension and analysis of
either an individual text or paired texts. Paired texts require students to
read and analyze two related texts. Paired texts are related by theme,
genre, tone, time period, or other characteristics.
• Many extended-response questions will ask students to express a position
and support it with text-based evidence. For paired texts, students will be
expected to synthesize ideas between and draw evidence from both texts.
Extended-response questions allow students to demonstrate their ability
to write a coherent essay using textual evidence to support their ideas.
• Student responses will be evaluated based on Common Core Writing
Standards and a student’s command of evidence to defend his or her
point.
What It Means to Use Authentic Texts
• Authentic texts are published works that are typically encountered by
students in daily life, such as in magazines, books or newspapers. The
2013 Grade 3 Common Core English Language Arts Test will use only
authentic texts.
• Many of the Common Core Reading for Information Standards require
students to recognize how authors support their opinions, to understand
the author’s point of view and purpose, and to be able to discern wellsupported arguments from those that are not. Students must demonstrate
their ability to determine point of view, purpose, and success of
argumentation with supporting evidence in subjects that they will
encounter both in other academic classes and in their daily lives.
• Example of authentic texts include; Roald Dahl’s James and The Giant
Peach, and a passage from Robert Coles’ The Story of Ruby Bridges.
Previous ELA 3rd Grade Question
• Which word best describes Elephant?
•
•
•
•
A curious
B friendly
C nervous
D upset
2013 Sample 3rd Grade Question
Read the following sentence from the first paragraph (from The Tortoise and
the Hare):
“The snow lay in waves and glistened like sugar.”
The author uses the word sugar to show that
A the hare was thinking about food
B the snow looked sparkly
C sugar was on the snow
D the snow tasted sweet
Key: B
Aligned CCLS: RL.3.4
Previous ELA 3rd Grade Question
• 2009 Day 2 short response:
How does feeding Buster help Kirby find his
shoes? Use one example from the story in your
answer.
2013 Sample 3rd Grade Question
Extended Constructed Response for “The Poplar Tree” by Flora J. Cooke
• Describe the way the poplar grows his branches. Explain why the tree
decides to grow them this way and how the actions of the Old Man, Iris,
Zeus, and Mercury lead to his decision. Use details from the story to
support your answer.
• In your response, be sure to include the following:
• The direction in which the poplar tree’s branches grow
• The events that made the tree’s branches grow this way
• The roles that the Old Man, Iris, Zeus, and Mercury play in the decision
• Details from the story to support your answer
Write your answer in complete sentences.
• CCLS Alignment: RL 3.2, RL.3.3, W.3.2, W.3.4,
Previous ELA 4th Grade Question
• This story is mostly about how
A being good at sports takes practice
B playing sports with a friend can be fun
C being an athlete means trying many sports
D playing sports is better than watching sports
2013 Sample 4th Grade Question
Which piece of dialogue supports the story’s main theme?
A “Let us stay here to-night,” they said, “and see what we can find in the morning.”
(paragraph 7)
B “Go back quickly and comfort my friend your mate, and say that I am coming.”
(paragraph 16)
C “Sooner or later these men will get our young.” (paragraph 31)
D “Why do you come at this hour of the night?” (paragraph 33)
Key: B
Aligned CCLS: RL.4.2
Commentary: This question aligns with RL.4.2 because it asks students to determine
how a central theme of the story is conveyed through details in the text.
Rationale: Option B is correct. The main theme of the story is that friends help each
other in times of need. This statement by the Kingfisher illustrates that theme.
Previous ELA 4th Grade Question
Imagine if the girl in “Butterfly House” had found a tadpole
instead of a butterfly. What would the girl have done to take
care of the tadpole? Do you think it would be more interesting to
take care of a tadpole or a butterfly? Use details from both
passages to support your answer.
In your answer be sure to
• describe how the girl would take care of a tadpole
• explain whether you think it would be more interesting to take
care of a tadpole or a butterfly
• use details from both passages to support your answer
Check your writing for correct spelling, grammar, capitalization, and
punctuation
2013 Sample 4th Grade Question
Extended Constructed Response
The myth and the article both provide explanations for why evergreen
trees keep their leaves in winter. How are the explanations similar and
different? Use specific examples from the myth and the article to
support your answer.
In your response be sure to include the following:
• describe what the myth says about why evergreen trees keep their
leaves in winter
• describe what the article says about why evergreen trees keep their
leaves in winter
• compare and contrast the two explanations
• include details from both the myth and the article to support your
Previous ELA 5th Grade Question
What does Else learn from her father’s story?
A how to train a workhorse
B how to swim with a horse
C how to make friends with a horse
D how to ride a horse without a saddle
2013 Sample 5th Grade Question
• How does the final paragraph contribute to the reader’s
understanding of the story? (From Heidi by Johanna Spyri)
A It suggests that Heidi will make the most of her new
surroundings
B It shows that Heidi will feel uncomfortable in her new home.
C It indicates how poor the family is.
D It shows how tired Heidi is.
• Key: D
• Aligned CCLS: RL.5.3
Previous ELA 5th Grade Question
If you were an animal, would you rather be a catfish
or a bird? Write an essay in which you explain your
choice. Use details from both “Flights of Fancy” and
“A Fish with Whiskers” to support your explanation.
In your answer, be sure to
• Describe which animal you would be
• Explain your choice
• Use details from both articles as support
2013 Sample 5th Grade Question
Extended Constructed Response
Both stories (The Secret Garden and Black Beauty) are told from the perspective of an
animal. How does this perspective affect how the stories are told? Compare and
contrast how Black Beauty and the robin view their surroundings. Use details from
both passages , describe how the animals’ perspective influence how events are
described.
•
•
•
•
•
In your response be sure to:
Describe the perspective of Black Beauty from “Black Beauty”
Describe the perspective of the robin from “The Secret Garden”
Explain how each author uses these perspectives to help the reader understand
the events as they unfold
Use details from both stories
•
•
Write your response in complete sentences
Aligned CCLS: RL.5.6, W.5.2
More Information
http://engageny.org/parent-and-family-resources
Common Core Sample Questions:
http://engageny.org/resource/new-york-state-common-coresample-questions
Visit http://corestandards.org/the-standards to read the full set
of Common Core State Standards.
Questions?

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