Common Curriculum and TPRS

Report
http://www.cde.state.co.us/StandardsAndInstruction/Curriculum/WorldLanguages.asp
• Because of Common Core and school policies, I
have to write and submit my unit plans and
syllabus before the school year starts in
September. Does anyone have a sample syllabus
and/or unit plan they would be willing to share?
• I also have to write an essential question for
every unit, as well as for the year. I´m struggling
with essential questions for the units, since they
are obviously not like the typical thematic unit.
Laura Terrill
• This flipped classroom concerns me because I feel
that it will not allow me to do TPRS/CI the way it is
intended and/or the way I want to teach. It takes
away from the authentic interactions (PQA, circling,
etc.) that help students create meaning with the
language in order to acquire it.
Concerns
• At our professional development meetings, we were
told that the Common Core movement is moving
away from teacher input (in a sense) and moving
toward student led classrooms and flipped
classrooms. Students would get the input from work
they do at home via technology/reading and then
have in-class work time on the analysis of
informational text (seems to be biggest emphasis on
informational text, more than literature).
Challenge
• We are required to create a curriculum map
integrating the Common Core and create our
"units" based on these standards.
• What does the Common Core really look like?
Common Core English Language
Standards
• Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make
logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or
speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. CCSS.ELALiteracy.CCRA.R.1
• Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its
development over the course of the text; provide an objective
summary of the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.RL.7.2
• Analyze how particular elements of a story interact (e.g., how setting
shapes the characters or plot). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.RL.7.3
• Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or
character and a historical account of the same period as a means of
understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. CCSS.ELALiteracy.RL.7.9
• Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events
using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured
event sequences. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.9-10.3
Common Core English Language
Standards
• Read closely to determine what the
text says explicitly and to make logical
inferences from it; cite specific textual
evidence when writing or speaking to
support conclusions drawn from the
text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.1
1. Why are the kids calling Sara a vampire?
2. What evidence do residents give that
indicates that Sara is a vampire?
3. How is the tragic event in the garden
important to the plot?
4. How does Sara’s mother’s explanation of the
incident differ from the community’s
explanation?
• Inference. 1. What is one thing you can infer
that happened in the garden? 2. Is this the
first time Sara has been bullied? Give evidence
from the text.
• Determine a theme or central idea of a text
and analyze its development over the course
of the text; provide an objective summary of
the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.RL.7.2
analyze its development
• Analyze how particular elements of a story
interact (e.g., how setting shapes the
characters or plot). CCSS.ELALiteracy.CCRA.RL.7.3
Newport, Rhode Island 1741
• Cyberbullying: What would the kids of
Newport do if they lived in today's world?
Reconstruct the conversation using social
media or other communication modes.
• Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of
a time, place, or character and a historical
account of the same period as a means of
understanding how authors of fiction use or
alter history. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.9
La Vampirata
“Todos los piratas se pusieron nerviosos, porque habían
escuchado historias sobre la increíble defensa de
Cartagena. Hace un mes 23.600 hombres atacaron
Cartagena. Tenían 186 barcos. El comandante de
Cartagena se llamaba General Blas de Lezo y defendió
Cartagena con seis barcos y menos de 6.000 hombres.
–El General Blas de Lezo defendió Cartagena.
Solamente tiene un ojo, un brazo y una pierna –
comentó Daniel.
–¡Blas tiene un ojo, un brazo y una pierna! No es
posible entrar en Cartagena –insistió Pepe.
–¡Cállate si tú no quieres tener un ojo, un brazo y una
pierna también! ¡Vamos a Cartagena! –le gritó Rafael a
Pepe.”
• Write narratives to develop real or imagined
experiences or events using effective
technique, well-chosen details, and wellstructured event sequences. CCSS.ELALiteracy.CCRA.W.9-10.3
Common Core Standards
Describe characters in a story and explain how their actions
contribute to the sequence of events. Reading Standard- Key
Ideas and Details #3, Grade 3
Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from
diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral
and explain how it is conveyed. Reading Standard- Key Ideas and
Details #2, Grade 3
Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a
visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each
version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
Reading Standard- Integration of Knowledge and Ideas #7, Grade
4
Common Curriculum at odds with
TPRS?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
5 Cs
3 modes of communication
Common assessments
Follows textbook
Follows a grammatical sequence
AP alignment
Pacing
Non-storytelling vocabulary
Interpersonal mode
Georgia Department of Education
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Work in pairs to create and/or practice simple conversations.
Perform a short skit or dialogue for a class, the school or the community.
Develop simple conversations based on provided visual cues.
Use flash cards or board activities to demonstrate comprehension, such as Q&A with flash cards,
Hangman, chalkboard drills, etc.
Play games such as charades, Concentration/Memory, Pictionary, Slaps, Go Fish, Guess Who, Dice
Games, Board Games, etc., to practice vocabulary and/or grammatical concepts.
Communicate via mail or the Internet with a pen pal in other classes, other schools in the U.S., or
countries where the target language is spoken.
Send and respond to simple invitations.
Interview a peer to gather information to fill out a form or complete a simple survey.
Work in pairs or in groups to retell a story that has been presented.
Give and/or follow simple directions.
Simulate a real world task such as conducting a basic telephone conversation, purchasing a ticket,
ordering a simple meal, making a hotel reservation, etc.
Work in pairs or groups to create illustrations that indicate comprehension of a story, description, or
sequence of events.
Work in pairs or groups to compare, complete or describe a picture.
Respond with gestures or body language, such as using Total Physical Response (TPR) activities.
B. Interpersonal: Have a conversation with a
peer (unrehearsed with a random partner).
Find out about your peer's uncle or aunt. What
do your uncle and your peer's uncle have in
common? Are they favorite uncles? Why? How
are they different? What stories about them can
you exchange? What has been one thing that
has surprised you about your uncle? Compare
them to Rebeca and Lucas.
Evaluations based on student growth
How do we show growth?
• Pre-assessment ideas: what should the test
include?
• What are valid measures of your students that
align well with state and national standards?
• What works well with storytelling?
• Conceptualize performance tasks connected
to the work that are real-life in nature
Language Acquisition is the result of…
•
•
•
•
•
Student-led classrooms, flipped classrooms
Project-based learning
Input
Student-led input at the upper levels
Healthy balance of student production
(speaking/writing) with reception
(listening/reading)
• Sufficient grammatical understandings
“Reading novels provides total exposure of up to
three times the number of words compared to
using a textbook.”
Dr. Sy-ying Lee
Former student of Dr. Stephen Krashen
• A plan to increase proficiency among lower
achieving students
• Reading plan
Plan of action
•
•
•
•
•
Lots of oral stories/input
Limit and narrow vocabulary
Short readings with limited vocabulary
Narrow readings that are self-selected
Novels that are too easy
Conduct an experiment
Non-storytelling
• Authentic texts (change the
task not the text)
• Textbook readings
• Non-fiction 70%
• Regular writing prompts
Storytelling
• Fiction that is simplified
• Novels
• Class stories
• Short stories
• Very little writing
• No projects
• Assessments towards the
end of the semesters

similar documents