Reading and Writing

Report
THE LANGUAGE ARTS FLORIDA STANDARDS
PREPARE OUR STUDENTS TO BE
GOOD THINKERS
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Ask questions
Identify and solve problems
Organize and evaluate ideas
Consider many points of view
Distinguish facts from opinion
Look at information in new ways
Draw and test conclusions
Use what they know and form new ideas
READING
DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE
WRITING
ESSENTIAL QUESTION
How can one person change the way you think?
INSTRUCTIONAL FOCUS
LAFS.3.RL.1.33 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their
traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions
contribute to the sequence of events
• Character, Setting, Plot: Cause and Effect:
• Use explicit and implicit details to describe a character (feelings,
emotions, behaviors)
• Use explicit and implicit details to describe a character’s actions
• Determine how a character and his/her actions affect the events in a
text
• Use explicit information from text to draw inferences about a character
and his/her actions
INSTRUCTIONAL FOCUS
LAFS.3.RL.2.4 (Also Assess LAFS.3.2.3a, LAFS.3.L.4 a, b, c &
LAFS.3.L.3.5 a, c) 4 Determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from
nonliteral language.
• Meaning of words and phrases
• Literal meaning of words
• Figurative meanings of words
• Unknown words and phrases
• Multiple meaning words and phrases
• Word relationships
• Nuances of meaning
• Words or phrases for effect
• Words and phrases central to the meaning of text
TEXT-BASED WRITING COMPONENT
OF THE ELA ASSESSMENT
Overall Task Description: Students will
read a stimulus about a single topic. The
stimulus should consist of informational or
literary fiction or nonfiction texts and can
cover a wide array of topics. After reading
the stimulus, the students will respond to a
writing prompt in which they will provide
information on a topic or take a stance to
support an opinion or argument.
OPINION PROMPT
GUIDELINES
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For the opinion/argumentative writing prompts,
students will be required to synthesize and
analyze ideas and evidence from stimuli. They
will use these ideas to present and support an
opinion (grades 4-5) or to argue and support a
claim (grades 6-11).
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Students will be presented with either a one part
or a two part Opinion Prompt.
WRITING PROMPT
GUIDED READING QUESTIONS
“Jane’s Discovery”
1. How does the author describe Jane?
2. a. Reread the paragraph on p. 202. How does Jane feel after Abe gave her his favorite book?
2b.Select sentences that show how Jane felt after receiving Abe’s favorite book? Explain how Jane’s feelings
affected the events in the text.
3. What qualities does Abraham Lincoln have? Why were these qualities important? How do these qualities
influence other characters?
4. How does the setting (era in American history)contribute to the characters’ actions-reactions?
“Finding Lincoln”
1. In “Finding Lincoln”, what does the author mean by, “Louis didn’t have time to count, but a million
seemed about right.”
2. How does the author illustrate this phrase in “Finding Lincoln”?
“Jane’s Discovery” AND “Finding Lincoln”
1. What effect does Abraham Lincoln have on the main characters in “Jane’s Discovery “ and “Finding
Lincoln”?
4. How are Mary McLeod’s actions similar to Abraham Lincoln’s
READING ASSESSMENT
HIGHER ORDER QUESTIONS
HIGHER ORDER QUESTIONS
EXTENDED RESPONSE
“The function of education is to
teach one to think intensively
and to think critically.
Intelligence plus character that
is the goal of true education”
Martin Luther King , Jr.

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