EarlyAlertCRLA

Report
Implementing an
Early Alert System
By
Karen J Hamman
Assistant Professor /
Director of Academic Support Services
Bloomsburg University
Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania
[email protected]
What is Early Alert?
Early Alert & Intervention is a systematic program or
initiative within higher education designed to identify and
support students at risk of attrition in order to improve
student success, retention and persistence. Early Alert &
Intervention is comprised of two key components:
o Alerts: A formal, proactive feedback system though
which student-support agents are alerted to “red
flags” regarding student success as early as possible.
o Intervention: A strategic method of outreach to
positively respond to red flags or alerts in order to
provide intrusive and individualized interventions to
students in need.
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Lynch-Holmes, K.B., Troy, A.B., and Ramos, I. (2011).
Early alert & intervention: Top practices for retention.
Retrieved from connectedu.com.
Why do we need Early
Alert Systems?
A QUALITY EARLY ALERT SYSTEM WILL:
• Support student retention initiatives
• Identify at-risk students before they struggle
• Make efficient use of resources
• Provide interventions to support students
• Use a team approach to support students
• Increase communication between support
services
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Timeline
Admission
Orientation
Overload
Start of Classes
Early Alert / Intervention
Midterm
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
What types of Early Alert
Systems exist?
• Home grown systems vs. Commercial
products
• Paper systems vs. Computerized methods
• Data collection can include:
o Background information
o Survey- Student Self Report
o Faculty input- grades/attendance
o Combination of above
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Commercial Products
• DropGuard
• Early Alert Retention Software
• GradesFirst
• MAP-Works
• Starfish Early Alert System
• Student Early Alert System
• Pharos360
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Bloomsburg University’s
Program
• 2011-2012 was the pilot year
• Established a steering committee to examine
products
• Purchased the MAP Works program (EBI)
• Fall 2011-Launched program
o
o
o
o
o
Established a support network utilizing current resources
Determined if the software was predictive
Examined First Year Seminar course
Made recommendations for staffing models
Created First Year Transition Plan assignment
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Source: www.webebi.com
Fall 2011 Pilot
• Survey sent to 894 students
o 502 undeclared (only those enrolled in
University Seminar)
o 392 Education majors
• Survey was sent approximately
Week 3. Students were given 2
weeks to complete.
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
MAP Works Survey Results- Fall 2011
Risk
Category
Number of
Students
Red x2
Very High
Risk
Red
High Risk
Yellow
Moderate
Risk
Green
Low Risk
Could not
Determine
97
7
191
565
34
Risk Level is initially determined using:
• Background data
• Survey responses
Risk Level will change with:
• Grades
• Alerts
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Fall 2011 Interventions
• All students with high or very high risk levels were
contacted first to schedule a meeting
• Students at moderate risk levels were contacted
second
• Students with low risk were invited to attend a mid
semester check-in group meeting
• Students placed on probation after the Fall
semester had continuous contact in the Spring 2012
semester in order to assist in their academic
recovery
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
2011 Assessment- GPA
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
2011 AssessmentOutcomes
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Fall 2012 Pilot
• 842 Undeclared students
• Staffing
o 2 graduate interns
o 2 full-time academic coaches
• Students in pilot were required:
o
o
o
o
o
To enroll in 1-credit University Seminar (MOST)
To take the survey between Weeks 3 & 4
To meet either in group or individually to review their results
To complete a transition plan
To complete an end of the semester reflection
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Academic Coaches
• Directly connect with and assist students experiencing
transitional issues
• Help develop educational sessions that demonstrate
evidence-based, best-practice support services for
students
• Develop and administer programming related to time
management, fiscal management, and academic
behaviors, i.e., study strategies, note taking, etc.
• Create and implement strategic communications to
new students about services and resources
• Assist with program evaluation and assessment providing
recommendations to enhance communications and the
strategic redesign or development of initiatives
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
University Seminar
• 1 credit course assigned to most first year
undeclared students
• Redesigned with common syllabus
• Course assignments:
o Participation / In class Assignments (20%)
o MAP Works Survey / First Year Transition Plan (30%)
o Class Reflection Papers (15%)
• Based on Guest speakers from support services
o Campus Event Reflection Papers (15%)
• Six required (2 academic, 2 diversity, 2 other)
o Final Reflection (20%)
• Reevaluating transition plan
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Transition Plan Elements
• Goal setting
o
o
o
o
Why are you in college?
What are your expected outcomes?
What are your life goals?
How are these related?
• Campus Resources
o What resources are available to you as a student
of BU?
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Transition Plan Elements
• Survey Analysis
o What are your strengths and areas for growth?
o How can you use your strengths to reach your
goals?
o How can you use resources available to you to
improve?
• Impressions / Obstacles
o What are the potential obstacles to success?
o What can you do to overcome them?
o What is the best and most challenging things
about college?
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
MAP Works Survey Results- Fall 2012
Risk
Category
Number of
Students
Red x2
Very High
Risk
Red
High Risk
Yellow
Moderate
Risk
Green
Low Risk
Could not
Determine
55
240
190
350
7
Students were assigned based on:
1. Program affiliation (Athletes, Trio, Act101)
2. Risk Level (Low, Moderate, High)
3. Primary Concerns (Academic or Social Transition)
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Student Takes Survey
Graduate Assistant
Reviews Results
1. Students affiliated with special
programs are assigned to
individuals in that area:
Athletes / Trio / Act101
2. Students NOT affiliated
with special programs
Moderate or High Risk
Students (Yellow or Red) are
assigned based on primary
needs
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Low Risk Students (Green)
are assigned to a group
meeting
Primarily Academic Needs are
assigned to Academic Coaches
Primarily Social Transition
issues are assigned to Residence
Life Staff
New Program
Development
• What are your goals:
o What is your current retention rates? Goals for retention?
o What are you going to do with the information obtained?
• Consider your resources:
o What resources do you have to support students?
o How can you make sure that available resources are
connected to the students that need it most?
o Is there funding available for software and/or staff?
• Consider the campus climate:
o Faculty cooperation with reporting student progress
o Support for retention initiatives
o Collaboration between academic affairs and student
affairs
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Key Elements
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Communication plan- Internal and External
Clear articulation of goals and benefits
Early Contact with Students
Network of support
Efficient use of resources
Students have one primary contact
Reporting structure
Assessment plan
Technical assistance / support
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
References
• Coll, K.M. and Stewart, R.A. (2002). Collaboration between
counseling services and an academic program: An
exploratory study of student outcome. Journal of College
Counseling, 5: 135-141.
• Cuseo, J. (2001). Academic-Support Strategies for Promoting
Student Retention and Achievement During the First Year of
College. University of Ulster, Student Transition and Retention,
http://www. ulster. ac. uk/star/resources/acdemic_
support_strat_first_years. pdf (accessed October 23, 2012).
• Lotkowski, V. A., Robbins, S. B., & Noeth, R. J. (2004). The role of
academic and non-academic factors in improving college
retention. ACT Policy Report, 20-24.
• Lynch-Holmes, K.B., Troy, A.B., and Ramos, I. (2011). Early alert
& intervention: Top practices for retention. Retrieved from
connectedu.com.
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
References
• Manthey, T. (2011). Using motivational interviewing to increase
retention in supported education. American Journal of
Psychiatric Rehabilitation, 14: 120-136.
• MAPWorks (2012). www.webebi.com
• Oster-Aaland, L. A. U. R. A. (2011). Enhancing student
persistence at North Dakota State University.
• Reese, T. D. Do Early Alert Programs Work?.
• Thornton, J. (2004). Partnership with academic unit increases
course retention. Recruitment & Retention in Higher Education,
July 2004: 3.
• Vander Schee, B.A. (2011). Early intervention: Using assessment
to reduce student attrition. About Campus, March-April 2011:
24-26.
• Wasley, P. (2007). A secret support network. Chronicle of
Higher Education, 53(23): A27-A29.
• White, J.D. (2012). Identifying more at-risk students with an
expanded data set. Retrieved from campuslabs.com.
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman
Questions?
Comments?
Session #44
Early Alert Systems
Karen J Hamman
[email protected]
CRLA 2012, Presenter: Karen J. Hamman

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