Document

Report
Joanne Cashman, Ed.D.
Director
The IDEA Partnership
at
The National Association of State Directors of
Special Education ( NASDSE)
www.ideapartnership.org
1-877-IDEA INFo
IDEA [email protected] 2013
1
Get In the Picture: Connecting with
Efforts to Improve Community and
Employment Outcomes
National Transition Community of Practice Webinar Team:
• Joan Kester, Senior Research Associate, George Washington University, Mid-Atlantic Technical
Assistance & Continuing Education Center
• Linda Tasco, Director of Program Services at Dept. of Economic Security/Division of Developmental
Disabilities, Arizona
• Melissa Flor, Special Education Program Specialist, SD Department of Education
• National Association of State Directors of Special Education, IDEA Partnership staff:
• Mariola Rosser, Senior Project Associate
• Joanne Cashman, Director
• Mironda Shepard, Project Assistant
March 27, 2013
IDEA [email protected] 2013
2
nd
2
in a 3 Part Webinar Series
• First Webinar: February 20, 2013 2:00 – 3:30 PM ET - Get
the Picture: Life after schooling for students with
moderate and significant disabilities:
http://tadnet.adobeconnect.com/p4jg930ee05/ .
• This Webinar: Get in the Picture: Connecting with Efforts
to Improve Community and Employment Outcomes
• 3rd Webinar: April 24, 2013 2:00 – 3:30 PM ET - Change
the Picture: A Shared Commitment to Improving Futures,
Access information: Adobe Connect
link: http://tadnet.adobeconnect.com/nsttac/, Dial: 1800-201-2375, Participant code: 611914#
IDEA [email protected] 2013
3
Purpose of this Webinar
• This webinar will showcase many exciting
national initiatives which promote integrated,
competitive employment for transitioning
youth with disabilities. Participants will learn
about the goals of each initiative, crossstakeholder engagement, how to connect to
state and local projects, where to tap into
resources, and have an opportunity for
dialogue.
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Employment Initiatives
Get in the Picture by learning about these employment
initiatives:
• National Governor’s Association’s A Better Bottom Line:
Employment of People with Disabilities
• Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation
Transition and Employment Priorities
• Administration on Developmental Disabilities Systems Change
Projects
• Employment First
• Social Security Administration: Youth Demonstration Projects
• Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration efforts
IDEA [email protected] 2013
A Better Bottom Line: Employing
People with Disabilities
NGA Chair’s Initiative 2012-13
Delaware Governor Jack Markell
March 2013
Lauren Stewart, Senior Policy Analyst
National Governors Association
IDEA [email protected] 2013
IDEA [email protected] 2013
What are we doing?
Work to date: Sessions with Governors at the NGA Winter Meeting; Two experts
roundtables; Over 50 meetings with subject matter experts July 2012-present.
IDEA [email protected] 2013
What are we learning?
I. Integrate disability employment within mainstream
II. Raise expectations for persons with disabilities
III. Share responsibility for moving the needle
IDEA [email protected] 2013
What are states doing now?
NGA Framework to Governors:
Making this part of the state workforce strategy
• Employment First
• States as Leaders and Model Employers
Early Intervention and High Expectations
• Youth transition and culture change
Ending ‘train and pray’ by securing employer partners
• Pathways to Employment initiative in Minnesota
• ConnectAbility
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Where are we going?
Upcoming events: Two State Policy Institutes and a Blueprint to Governors to
be released at the Annual Meeting, capturing what we’ve learned and
outlining a framework for action going forward.
IDEA [email protected] 2013
How can you support this work?
• Use your connections to students to set high expectations
for individuals with disabilities.
Old expectation: “Will I get a job?
New expectation: “What job will I get?”
• Engage your own networks to promote awareness about
the skills and abilities of people with disabilities
• Consider each state’s policy framework and align your
efforts to the maximum extent possible
IDEA [email protected] 2013
A Better Bottom Line: Employing
People with Disabilities
Lauren Stewart
Senior Policy Analyst
National Governors Association
March 2013
IDEA [email protected] 2013
[email protected] | 202.624.5332
Vocational Rehabilitation (VR)
Andrea Guest, Chair, CSAVR Transition Services Committee &
Executive Director, DE Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
Joan Kester, Senior Research Associate, George Washington
University, Mid-Atlantic Technical Assistance & Continuing
Education Center
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Overview of VR Initiatives
The purpose of the Rehab. Act and VR program nationally is to
empower individuals with disabilities to maximize employment,
economic self-sufficiency, independence, and inclusion and
integration into society
• Council of State Administrators of VR (CSAVR):
Transition Services Committee
• CSAVR VR-Business Network
• Examples of Employment Initiatives
– Delaware Early Start Supported Employment
– Mid-Atlantic Transition Leadership Council – Models of
Replication
IDEA [email protected] 2013
CSAVR Transition Services Committee:
National Efforts
• VR recognizes transition as a priority
• Federal monitoring – one of the 3 focus areas.
• White paper on transition – legislative impact
(career development phase)
• Committee focus to share best practices in
transition to employment
White paper:
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&ved
=0CEsQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rehabnetwork.org%2Fcommittees%2F10%2Ft
s%2FCSAVR%2520Position%2520Paper%2520on%2520%2520Transition%2520Services.
docx&ei=eDlDUbPsHoXF4APxr4D4Ag&usg=AFQjCNE_2ERZ0fnQDLPKDgjww82T1CTdxA
&sig2=FUOvvDg9B4RPBkiTszO-Ng&bvm=bv.43828540,d.dmg
How to connect: CSAVR Website, http://www.rehabnetwork.org/
IDEA [email protected] 2013
The National
VR-Business Network
Nationwide Efforts
Source: PowerPoint developed by Kathy West-Evans, Council of
State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), Director
of Business Relations, http://www.rehabnetwork.org/busrel/
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Key Concepts
• Customer-Driven Networks
• Building and Sustaining a Business
Partnership Network: “One
Company” Approach
Dual Customer Approach
• This term describes a customer service
strategy that recognizes both INDIVIDUALS
WITH DISABILITIES and EMPLOYERS or
business as a customer.
• We are responsible for educating
employers about the benefits of
accommodations and assistive technology.
• This requires a dual customer approach in
the delivery of services.
32nd IRI, "The VR-Business Network: Charting Your Course“ located at
http://iriforum.org/download/32nd%20IRI_VRBusiness_Network.pdf
IDEA [email protected] 2013
National VR-Business Network
• Through this national network, there is a
Point of Contact in each public VR state
agency.
• Beyond this VR initiative, there may be
many other priorities and projects of the
public VR agency.
• Here is a link to the state contacts:
http://www.ed.gov/rschstat/research/pubs/vrpractices
/busdev.html
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Mid-Atlantic Transition Leadership
Council: Regional Initiative
• The GW Technical Assistance & Continuing
Education Center supports this learning
community, comprised of VR and Special
Education State-level Transition Coordinators
• The purpose of the group is to create a venue
to brainstorm with peers, to share existing
resources, to develop needed tools/resources,
and to share effective practices.
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Mid-Atlantic Transition Leadership
Council: Models of Replication
• Models of Replication Webinar Series: First
one showcased the Start on Success model
from Maryland, a partnership between VR and
a provider agency to create paid internships
for recently transitioned youth, which leads to
competitive employment. To date – Delaware
and Virginia are replicating the model!
– The group is working on developing a series of
webinar to showcase models of replication.
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Delaware Early Start Supported
Employment Project: State Initiative
• The Early Start to Supported Employment
(ESSE) project started in 2005 with the goal of
providing a more seamless transition for
students who would benefit from supported
employment services when leaving school and
entering the adult workforce.
• An interagency project team was established
to guide the pilot work.
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Delaware Early Start Supported
Employment Project Team
• The team was instrumental to the success of the
project, and included representatives from:
– Delaware Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR)
– Delaware Division of Developmental Disabilities
Services (DDDS)
– Delaware Department of Education (DOE)
– Higher education
– Participating local school districts
– A parent of a young adult
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Delaware Early Start Supported
Employment Project Funding
• The agencies pledged to creatively use existing funds to
achieve their goals.
– As the transition-aged young adults pass predefined
checkpoints (milestones) on the way to their employment
goals, DVR uses allocated transition funds.
– DDS provides follow-along funds to ensure individuals and
families receive support, information, and counseling as
needed and to maintain continuous contact through the
various stages of the individual's life.
– DOE contributes funds on a case-by-case basis with the
emphasis on primary funding from the other two systems.
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Delaware Early Start Supported
Employment Project Impact
• A range of providers have successfully
collaborated within existing rules and resources,
committing to involve a wide range of entities,
including the adult service providers.
• This team met regularly to identify successes,
challenges and solutions.
• The need for accountability and input from
everyone is supported and expected as a
condition of participation and has led to the
project's evolving success.
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Projects of National Significance:
Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change
Presented by
Larissa R. Crossen, Program Specialist
Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Administration for Community Living
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
(202) 690-5999
[email protected]
27
Agenda
• Discuss the purpose and objectives of the
Partnerships in Employment Systems Change grants
• Identify AIDD’s Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change grants, Employment T&TA grant, and
Employment Evaluation contract
• Discuss AIDD’s Community of Practice (CoP) grant
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PNS: Partnerships in Employment
Systems Change grants
Purpose:
• To enhance collaboration across existing State systems,
including programs administered by State Developmental
Disabilities agencies, State Vocational Rehabilitation agencies,
State Educational agencies, and other entities to increase
competitive employment for youth and young adults with
developmental and intellectual disabilities.
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PNS: Partnerships in Employment Systems Change
Grants
Objectives:
• Development of policies that support competitive employment in
integrated settings as the first and desired outcomes for youth and young
adults with developmental disabilities and intellectual disabilities
• Removal of systemic barriers to competitive employment in integrated
settings
• Implementation of strategies and best practices that improve employment
outcomes for youth and young adults with developmental and
intellectual disabilities
• Enhanced statewide collaborations that can facilitate the transition
process from secondary and post-secondary school, or other vocational
training settings, to competitive employment integrated settings.
PNS: Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change grants:
Design
Required Partners for Consortium
• State Developmental Disabilities Council
• State Department of Rehabilitation Agency
• State Intellectual Disabilities/Developmental Agency
• State Educational Agency
PNS: Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change grants: Design
Optional Partners:
• Protection and Advocacy Systems
• University for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education,
Research, and Service
• Non-profit organizations lead by individuals with developmental
and intellectual disabilities, and/or families of such individuals, who
have demonstrated expertise and experience in improving
outcomes for individuals with developmental and intellectual
disabilities
• State Agency supported by the U.S. Department of Labor
administering an employment training program
PNS: Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change grants: Design
Optional Partners Continued:
• Entities providing pre-vocational, supported employment services to
youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities,
and Community Rehabilitation providers
• Public and Private Employers
• Other entities with demonstrated expertise and experience in improving
competitive employment outcomes in integrated settings for individuals
with developmental and intellectual disabilities
PNS: Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change grants:
Requirements:
• Develop innovative strategies to exchange and transfer
knowledge and best practices between member of the
consortium and other statewide systems
• Develop an employment work group aimed at developing
and implementing new policy and systems change
necessary to translate that policy to practice
• Develop support models for providing education, prevocational services, and training that effectively prepare
and transition youth with developmental and intellectual
disabilities from secondary or post-secondary education to
competitive employment in integrated settings.
PNS: Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change grants:
Requirements:
• Explore ways to stimulate the development of a wider array
of service providers supporting access to, and maintaining
retention, in competitive employment in integrated settings
• Develop a method to provide on-going training and technical
assistance to State systems
• Develop on-going partnerships with provider organizations
which actively encourage organizational transformation and
reallocation of resources to programs and services that
emphasize competitive employment in integrated settings.
PNS: Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change grants:
Current Employment Grants
1) Regents of the University of California
2) Mississippi Department of Mental Health
3) Wisconsin Board for People with Developmental
Disabilities
4) Iowa Department of Human Services
5) Curator of the University of Missouri
6) University of Rochester, NY
7 Governor’s Council on Disabilities ands Special Education, AK
8) Vanderbilt University, TN
PNS: Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change grants:
Training and Technical Assistance
In September 2011, AIDD awarded a Training and Technical
Assistance grants to support the employment efforts of the grants.
• The Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI) currently serves as the Training
and Technical Assistance provider for the Partnerships for Employment
Systems Change grants.
• In their efforts to provide training and technical assistance, ICI will develop
communities of practice designed to share knowledge and resources for
systems change, discuss ideas to address employment challenges,
promote collaboration and understanding, and build skills.
• ICI will also provide assistance in developing performance benchmarking.
PNS: Partnerships in Employment Systems
Change grants:
Evaluation Contract
In September 2011, AIDD also awarded an evaluation contract.
• The Lewin Group currently serves as the third party evaluation contractor
has developed a systems change evaluation of the Partnerships for
Employment Change grants to inform AIDD and its partners how to best
work to support competitive, integrated employment systems for
individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
Community of Practice (CoP)
In September 2012, AIDD will awarded a CoP with the purpose of
• Recruiting and establishing formal agreements with between
5 and 10 State partnerships.
• Developing a consensus across the CoP to define the needs
of individuals to support competitive integrated employment
outcomes
• Indentifying challenges in the service system and in
communities, including Federal and State policy and practice
barriers
• Covening in-person meetings of all CoP members annually.
• Establishing and support implementation plans of the CoP
States.
• With CoP members to implement, adapt, and promote
strategies, policy
AIDD Website links
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/aidd
/programs/pns
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/aidd
/resource/fact-sheet-aiddsemployment-first-initiatives
Get In the Picture:
Connecting with Efforts to Improve Community
and Employment Outcomes
David Hoff
Program Director
Institute for Community Inclusion
University of Massachusetts Boston
617-287-4308 - [email protected]
www.communityinclusion.org - www.seln.org
Board President
APSE – www.apse.org
Employment First: What Is It?

General theme:
Employment in the community is the first/primary
service option for individuals with disabilities
APSE Statement on Employment First
Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome
in the provision of publicly funded services for all working age citizens
with disabilities, regardless of level of disability.
Employment
First
2013

35+ states have some type of
“Employment First” movement
 About 3/4 of efforts are directed by
state policy units or are legislatively
based
 About 1/4 of efforts are grassroots
based – i.e., outsiders working to
influence state policy and practice

At least 21 states (including Oklahoma)
have official Employment First
legislation and/or polices

Push for a Federal Definition in
Rehabilitation Act
Employment
First Policies:
A Closer Look

States with a policy: AR, CA,
CO, CT, DE, KS, LA, MD, MA,
ME, MI, MO, MA, NJ, OH, OK,
PA, TN, UT, VA, WA

7 states have passed legislation
(CA, DE, KS, PA, VA, UT, WA)

Remainder are Executive Orders,
policy directives, etc.

8 state polices are crossdisability; remainder ID/DD

Extensive variation in policy
substance & clarity
Employment First
Policies:
Relation to
Outcomes
 States
with policies
vary extensively in
terms of progress and
outcomes
 Partially due to timing:
many are less than 2
years old
 Others:
lacking in
commitment/followthrough
The Challenges
of Employment
First

Clarity and scope of efforts vary
 Example – Some include group
employment, sub-minimum wage

It’s easier to change policy than
practice

Overly identified with ID/DD

In danger of becoming just the latest
fad and “buzz word”

Cases of misapplication:
 Focus is not on employment as first priority
 Used to simply promote good employment
strategies not focused on policy and
systems change

Eliminate criteria and professional
judgments regarding work
“readiness”

Consideration of employment
mandated part of any type of
individual planning for persons of
working age

Documentation for nonconsideration of employment is
required

Decision to not consider
employment is re-visited on regular
basis
Turning Employment
First Into Reality:
Polices & Practices
that Presume
Employability
Employment
First & Transition
Policies

Prohibit use of facility-based
services during transition

Allow facility-based services as
outcome as exception requiring
high administrative approval

Employment addressed as a core
element of IEP starting no later than
age 14

Require high level of
documentation if decision is made
not to pursue employment

Effective Indicator 14 measurement
and monitoring
Employment First
& Transition
Practices


Presume that all students can
succeed in employment
Support typical student work
experiences
 Jobs after school and weekends;
summer jobs
 No more job “programs”

Integrate students into school-tocareer opportunities available to
all students
 Internships, job shadowing, etc.

Link with vocational education
programs
State Employment Leadership Network
What is the SELN?
 National membership network of
state
intellectual and developmental disability
agencies
 Currently
27 member states
SELN Member States 3/2013
Strategy
Policy
Leadership
Funding
Outcome Data
Values
Capacity
Development
Innovation
Collaboration
Integrated
Jobs
How The Network Works
 Assessment
and
development of strategic
plan for each state
 Ongoing technical
assistance
 Monthly network calls
 Topical webinars
 Ongoing availability of
peer support
SELN:
What We’ve Learned

Systems change must fit within overall
culture of state

Systems change requires both:
big picture perspective and leadership
willingness to get into “nitty gritty” policy and
practice details

Slow and steady wins the race

It’s not one thing, it’s a lot of things
“ A ship in harbor is safe --but that is not
what ships are built for. ”
 John A.
Shedd
Youth Transition Demonstration
(YTD)
Jeffrey Hemmeter
March 27, 2013
57
YTD-What is it?
• The Youth Transition Demonstration (YTD) is a random
assignment research study to promote and rigorously
evaluate promising strategies to help youth with
disabilities become as economically self-sufficient as
possible as they transition from school to work.
• YTD is part of a broader initiative to encourage
disability beneficiaries to work.
• Partners: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR),
MDRC, TransCen, Inc.
58
YTD-Who and Where?
• Population
– Youths ages 14 to 25
– Receiving or at risk of receiving:
• Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
• Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI)
• Six Sites
– Colorado
– Erie County, NY
– Bronx County, NY
– Miami, FL
– Montgomery County,
MD
– West Virginia
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YTD Logic Model
60
YTD Waivers
• Student Earned Income Exclusion (SEIE):
– For YTD participants the age limit is waived.
• Individual Development Accounts (IDAs):
– For YTD participants, the qualification criteria for IDAs includes a wider range of
savings objectives than usual and includes IDAs that do not receive federal matching
funds.
• Earned Income Exclusion:
– SSA disregards $65 plus three-fourths of additional earnings by YTD participants.
• Plan for Achieving Self-Support (PASS):
– For YTD participants there are more allowable goals for a PASS, including
postsecondary education and career explorations.
• Section 301:
– The effect of a negative continuing disability review or age-18 redetermination is
delayed until the end of waiver eligibility.
61
Bronx County, New York
• Lead Organization: John F. Kennedy, Jr. Institute for
Worker Education of the City University of New York
(CUNY)
• Population: SSI, SSDI, and CDB beneficiaries 15-19
years old
• Length of Services: Up to 20 months
• Program Model: School-year oriented; Saturday
workshops on empowerment, benefits planning,
person-centered planning, recreation; guaranteed 7week summer employment; follow-up as needed
62
Colorado
• Lead Organization : Colorado WIN Partners/University
of Colorado Denver (Colorado Youth WINS)
• Population: SSI, SSDI, and CDB beneficiaries 14-25
years old
• Length of Services: At least 18 months
• Program Model: Case-management oriented; located
in One-Stops with Disability Program Navigator that
assisted with referrals to VR and other providers
63
Erie County, New York
• Lead Organization : Erie 1 Board of Cooperative
Educational Services (Erie Transition WORKS)
• Population: SSI, SSDI, and CDB beneficiaries 16-25
years old
• Length of Services: At least 18 months
• Program Model: Self-determination program; job
experiences; system linkages and coordination
with VR; benefits counseling
64
Miami-Dade County, Florida
• Lead Organization : Abilities, Inc. of Florida
• Population: SSI, DI, and CDB beneficiaries 16-22
years old
• Length of Services: 9 to 18 months
• Program Model: Strong employment focus and
strong benefits counseling and financial literacy
components
65
Montgomery County, Maryland
• Lead Organization : St. Luke’s House, Inc.
• Population: High school juniors and seniors with an
SED diagnosis by the public school system or a
significant mental illness determined by the public
mental health system
• Length of Services: 9 to 18 months
• Program Model: Focused on competitive paid
employment; highly individualized services; Partnered
with VR and had a VR counselor that dealt with all the
CTP cases
66
West Virginia
• Lead Organization : Human Resources
Development Foundation, Inc.; Partnered with
Centers for Excellence in Disabilities (CED) WVU
• Population: SSI, DI, and CDB beneficiaries 15-25
years old
• Length of Services: 18 months
• Program Model: Strong benefits counseling and
social events.
67
Paid Employment
in Year Following Enrollment
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Treatment
Control
*** indicates significance at the 1% level.
68
Service Intensity
Average Service
Time (Hours)a
Average
Employment
Service Time
(Hours)a
Employment
Impact (%)b
West Virginia
33.7
23.6
19.1***
Bronx
42.8
20.7
9.7***
Florida
28.5
13.9
9.4***
Erie
12.7
5.8
2.1
Colorado
7.1
4.0
1.3
Maryland
28.3
10.2
-4.2
Site
*** indicates significance at the 1% level.
a Source: Efforts-to-Outcomes management information system.
b Source: 12-month survey.
69
Early YTD Outcomes-12 month Surveys
(Phase 1 Sites)
Outcome
Colorado
Bronx
Erie
12.4***
(61.7)
16.2***
(68.0)
13.7***
(66.3)
Ever employed on paid job
1.3
(34.4)
9.7***
(30.5)
2.1
(43.6)
Ever enrolled in school, or had
completed high school by the end of
the year
0.0
(86.9)
1.7
(90.7)
-3.0
(82.0)
-$283
($8,314)
-$24
($7,148)
$183
($9,013)
1.1
(65.9)
-5.4
(68.0)
-2.4
(67.3)
Used any employment promoting
service
Total income (earnings and SSA
benefits) ($)
Personal goals include working and
earning enough to stop receiving
benefits
*** indicates significance at the 1% level.
Treatment group average in parentheses.
70
Early YTD Outcomes-12 month Surveys
(Phase 2 Sites)
Outcome
Maryland
Florida
West Virginia
22.0***
(76.0)
12.5***
(58.2)
29.8***
(63.6)
Ever employed on paid job
-4.2
(53.4)
9.4***
(22.8)
19.1***
(42.7)
Ever enrolled in school, or had
completed high school by the end of
the year
1.2
(91.3)
-2.5
(81.6)
3.7
(82.4)
-$386
($4,239)
$424*
($6,762)
$717***
($8,060)
-2.3
(81.6)
-2.2
(70.1)
-1.1
(66.0)
Used any employment promoting
service
Total income (earnings and SSA
benefits) ($)
Personal goals include working and
earning enough to stop receiving
benefits
*/*** indicates significance at the 10%/1% level.
Treatment group average in parentheses.
71
Summary of 12-Month Findings
• Youth are receiving employment services
• It may take time for those services to translate into
employment and a reduction in SSI/SSDI participation
• Waivers work as intended
• More treatment youth remain on program
• Treatment youth have higher payments
• We see an impact on employment in some sites
• This is positively correlated with employment service
hours
72
More Information
• http://www.ssa.gov/disabilityresearch/youth.htm
– Descriptions
– Interim Reports
– Evaluation Design
• http://www.mathematica-mpr.com/disability/ytd.asp
– Research Briefs
• Final report due in Sept. 2014
73
Questions & Wrap-up:
Employment Initiatives
Do you have any questions for our presenters about the
initiatives we discussed today?
• National Governor’s Association’s A Better Bottom Line:
Employment of People with Disabilities
• Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation
Transition and Employment priorities
• Administration on Developmental Disabilities Systems Change
Projects
• Employment First
• Social Security Administration: Youth Demonstration Projects
• Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration efforts
Thanks to our presenters for sharing valuable information about
how we can Get in the Picture of employment initiatives!
IDEA [email protected] 2013
Follow us on www.sharedwork.org site
• Webinar Series on Employment
– Get the Picture: What is life after HS like for
students with significant disabilities?
– Get in the Picture: Who is working on these
issues?
– Change the Picture - April 24, 2013, 2:00 –
3:30 PM Eastern
IDEA [email protected] 2013
75
For more information about the
IDEA Partnership
• Visit the website: www.ideapartnership.org
• Call toll free line at: 1-877-IDEA INFo
The IDEA Partnership is funded by the U.S. Department of Education
Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) and is part of the
Technical Assistance and Dissemination network
IDEA [email protected] 2013
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