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Report
Journal of Economic Psychology
Editor Experience
Erich Kirchler
University of Vienna
1
Content
• What is the Journal of Economic Psychology?
(Aims, editors, associate editors, editorial board, bibliometry etc.)
• What information should authors have before
submitting a paper?
• How to submit a paper?
• What is the editors‘ and publisher‘s job?
• What conclusions can be drawn for writing a
good manuscript?
2
Journal of Economic Psychology
Research in Economic Psychology and Behavioral Economics
Affiliated with the
International Association for Research in Economic Psychology
The Journal aims to present research that will improve understanding of behavioral,
especially socio-psychological, aspects of economic phenomena and processes.
The Journal contains: (a) reports of empirical research on economic behavior; (b)
assessments of the state of the art in various subfields of economic psychology; (c) articles
providing a theoretical perspective or a frame of reference for the study of economic
behavior; (d) articles explaining the implications of theoretical developments for practical
applications; (e) book reviews; (f) announcements of meetings, conferences and seminars.
The Journal addresses psychologists and economists
Guide for Authors
Submit Your Paper
Track Your Paper
Order Journal
Access Full Text
3
4
Editorial Team
 Associate Editors:
•
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•
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•
•
•
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•
•
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Lucy Ackert
Paul Anand
Ofer Azar
Ananish Chaudhuri
Gerlinde Fellner
Simon Gaechter
Tommy Gärling
Martin Kocher
Brit Grosskopf
 Book Review Editor:
– Andreas Ortmann
 Previous Associate Editors
– Paul H. Dolan
– Rob Ranyard
– Gaelle Villejoubert
Doron Kliger
Alexander Kritikos
David Leiser
Ayse Önçüler
Andreas Ortmann
Marc Scholten
Michelle Baddeley
Stefan Schulz-Hardt
Tomasz Zaleskiewicz
 Publisher:
 Wendy Shamier
[email protected]
 Journal Manager:
 Mary Shyla Sivasubramaniyam
[email protected]
5
Published Special Issues and Special Sections
• Volume 33, Issue 2
pp. 319-424 (April 2012)
Special Issue: Entrepreneurial Personality
• Volume 32, Issue 4
pp. 543 - 650 (August 2011)
Special Issue: Financial Capability
• Volume 32, Issue 2
pp. 205-293 (March 2011)
Special Issue: Poverty Special Issue
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Forthcoming Special Issues and Special
Sections
•
Forthcoming “Self-Regulation and Strategic Motivational Orientations in
Economic Contexts”
_Arnd Florack and Johannes
•
Keller (Guest Editors)
Forthcoming “ Behavioural Dynamics of Tax Evasion”
_Stephan Muehlbacher, Michael Pickhardt and Aloys Prinz (Guest Editors)
•
Forthcoming “From Dual Processes to Multiple Selves: Implications for
Economic Behavior”
_Carlos Alós-Ferrer and Fritz Strack (Guest Editors)
7
Journal of Economic Psychology
Call for Papers
•
•
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Behavioral Dynamics of Tax Evasion
From Dual Processes to Multiple Selves:
Implications for Economic Behavior
View All
Recent Articles
•
Most Read Articles
•
Recently published articles available online on
SciVerse ScienceDirect.
•
The most downloaded articles from SciVerse
ScienceDirect in the last 90 days.
•
The material and immaterial in conflict: Spirituality
reduces conspicuous consumption Tyler F. Stillman |
Frank D. Fincham | ...
Lifecycle effects on consumer financial product
portfolios in South Africa: An exploratory analysis of
four ethnic groups Mthunzi A. Ngwenya | Leonard J.
Paas
The relevance of thinking-by-analogy for investors’
willingness-to-pay: An experimental study Hammad
Siddiqi
•
•
The GDP paradox Jeroen C.J.M. van den Bergh
Behavioral finance and asset prices: Where do we
stand? Livio Stracca
Invest now, drink later, spend never: On the mental
accounting of delayed consumption Eldar Shafir |
Richard H. Thaler
View All
•
•
•
•
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Articles Received and Processed in 2008 - 2013
Submitted
No. of
articles
Final disposition
No. of
articles
Processing times
(in weeks)
Subm.
to 1st
decn.
Results
Auth.
Sub. to
rev. time fin. disp.
Withdra
wn
Accepted
Rejecte
d
Reject
rate
2008
244
190
16.2
17.2
27
8
50
132
0.73
2009
289
269
17.8
20.4
32.1
19
80
170
0.68
2010
315
340
18.8
23.7
31.4
19
84
237
0.74
2011
421
408
11.5
20.6
21.9
5
117
286
0.71
2012
452
467
10.5
24.4
20.2
15
100
352
0.78
2013
(June)
165
184
9.2
19.1
18.2
11
42
131
0.76
9
No of articles
Regular/Special Issue Articles
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Total
Regular
Spec. Iss.
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
YTD
10
Publication Speed: Previous Years
11
Regional Breakdown of Authors
12
Bibliometry
Year
Total
cites
Impact
Factor
Five-Year
Impact Factor
Immediacy
index
Articles
Cited half-life
2007
763
0.9
1.213
0.048
42
8.8
2008
910
0.943
1.326
0.51
51
8.6
2009
1189
1.473
1.670
0.125
72
8.5
2010
1389
1.358
1.749
0.091
88
8.5
2011
1576
1.069
1.617
0.176
85
9.0
2012
1780
1.081
1.749
0.263
95
8.9
Impact factor: The number of current citations to articles published in a specific journal in a two year period divided by the
total number of articles published in the same journal in the corresponding two year period.
Five-Year Impact Factor: To calculate the five year Impact Factor, citations are counted in 2012 to the previous five years
and divided by the source items published in the previous five years.
© Journal Citation Reports 2013, Published by Thomson Reuters
Immediacy index: The average number of times that an article published in a specific year within a specific journal is cited
over the course of that same year.
Cited half-life: The number of years, going back from the current year, that account for 50% of the total citations received by
the cited journal in the current year.
13
AUTHOR INFORMATION
JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC PSYCHOLOGY
Research in Economic Psychology and Behavioral Economics
• Description
• Audience
• Impact Factor
• Abstracting and Indexing
• Editorial Board
• Guide for Authors
The Journal aims to present research that will improve understanding of behavioral, especially sociopsychological,
aspects of economic phenomena and processes. The Journal seeks to be a channel for the increased interest in using
behavioral science methods for the study of economic behavior, and so to contribute to better solutions of societal
problems, by stimulating new approaches and new theorizing about economic affairs. Economic psychology as a
discipline studies the psychological mechanisms that underlie consumption and other economic behavior. It deals with
preferences, choices, decisions, and factors influencing these, as well as the consequences of decisions and choices
with respect to the satisfaction of needs. This includes the impact of external economic phenomena upon human
behavior and well-being. Studies in economic psychology may relate to different levels of aggregation, from the
household and the individual consumer to the macro level of whole nations. Economic behavior in connection with
inflation, unemployment, taxation, economic development, as well as consumer information and economic behavior in
the market place are thus the major fields of interest.
© Copyright 2011 Elsevier | http://www.elsevier.com
14
BEFORE YOU BEGIN
Ethics in publishing
Conflict of interest
Submission Declaration
Copyright
Retained author rights
Role of the funding source
Funding body agreements and policies
Open access
Language and language services
Submission
Book Reviews
17
PREPARATION
Use of wordprocessing software
It is important that the file be saved in the native format of the wordprocessor used. The text should be in single-column format. Keep the layout of the text as
simple as possible...
Article structure
Subdivision - numbered sections
Divide your article into clearly defined and numbered sections. Subsections should be numbered 1.1 (then 1.1.1, 1.1.2, ...), 1.2, etc. (the abstract is not included
in section numbering). Use this numbering also for internal cross-referencing: do not just refer to 'the text'. Any subsection may be given a brief heading. Each
heading should appear on its own separate line.
Introduction
State the objectives of the work and provide an adequate background, avoiding a detailed literature survey or a summary of the results.
Method: Participants, material and methods, procedure
Provide sufficient detail to allow the work to be reproduced. Methods already published should be indicated by a reference: only relevant
modifications should be described.
Results
Results should be clear and concise.
Discussion
This should explore the significance of the results of the work, not repeat them. A combined Results and Discussion section is often
appropriate. Avoid extensive citations and discussion of published literature.
Conclusions
The main conclusions of the study may be presented in a short Conclusions section, which may stand alone or form a subsection of a
Discussion or Results and Discussion section.
Appendices
If there is more than one appendix, they should be identified as A, B, etc. Formulae and equations in appendices should be given separate
numbering: Eq. (A.1), Eq. (A.2), etc.; in a subsequent appendix, Eq. (B.1) and so on. Similarly for tables and figures: Table A.1; Fig. A.1, etc.
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AFTER ACCEPTANCE
Use of the Digital Object Identifier
The Digital Object Identifier (DOI) may be used to cite and link to electronic documents. The DOI consists of a unique alpha-numeric character
string which is assigned to a document by the publisher upon the initial electronic publication. The assigned DOI never changes. Therefore, it is an
ideal medium for citing a document, particularly 'Articles in press' because they have not yet received their full bibliographic information. The
correct format for citing a DOI is shown as follows (example taken from a document in the journal Physics Letters B):
doi:10.1016/j.physletb.2010.09.059 When you use the DOI to create URL hyperlinks to documents on the web, the DOIs are guaranteed
never to change.
Proofs
One set of page proofs (as PDF files) will be sent by e-mail to the corresponding author (if we do not have an e-mail address then paper proofs will
be sent by post) or, a link will be provided in the e-mail so that authors can download the files themselves. Elsevier now provides authors with
PDF proofs which can be annotated; for this you will need to download Adobe Reader version 7 (or higher) available free from
http://get.adobe.com/reader. Instructions on how to annotate PDF files will accompany the proofs (also given online). The exact system
requirements are given at the Adobe site: http://www.adobe.com/products/reader/tech-specs.html. If you do not wish to use the PDF annotations
function, you may list the corrections (including replies to the Query Form) and return them to Elsevier in an e-mail. Please list your corrections
quoting line number. If, for any reason, this is not possible, then mark the corrections and any other comments (including replies to the Query
Form) on a printout of your proof and return by fax, or scan the pages and e-mail, or by post. Please use this proof only for checking the
typesetting, editing, completeness and correctness of the text, tables and figures. Significant changes to the article as accepted for publication will
only be considered at this stage with permission from the Editor. We will do everything possible to get your article published quickly and accurately
– please let us have all your corrections within 48 hours. It is important to ensure that all corrections are sent back to us in one communication:
please check carefully before replying, as inclusion of any subsequent corrections cannot be guaranteed. Proofreading is solely your responsibility.
Note that Elsevier may proceed with the publication of your article if no response is received.
Offprints
The corresponding author, at no cost, will be provided with a PDF file of the article via e-mail. For an extra charge, paper offprints can be ordered
via the offprint order form which is sent once the article is accepted for publication. The PDF file is a watermarked version of the published article
and includes a cover sheet with the journal cover image and a disclaimer outlining the terms and conditions of use.
AUTHOR INQUIRIES
For inquiries relating to the submission of articles (including electronic submission) please visit this journal's homepage. Contact details for
questions arising after acceptance of an article, especially those relating to proofs, will be provided by the publisher. You can track accepted
articles at http://www.elsevier.com/trackarticle. You can also check our Author FAQs (http://www.elsevier.com/authorFAQ) and/or contact
Customer Support via http://support.elsevier.com.
© Copyright 2011 Elsevier | http://www.elsevier.com
27
INSTRUCTION TO SUBMIT PAPER IN EDITORIAL SYSTEM
1)
Please include the other authors in Add/Edit/Remove authors section
28
2. Please enter abstract
29
3. Please insert PsycINFO and JEL Classification codes along with keywords
30
4. Please select classifications
31
5. Please add 4 potential reviewers (full name, e-mail address & a short rational), also select a response for the below question
32
6. Please attach files using the below instructions
Please submit the below items:
• Highlights (maximum 3 - 5 bullet points Max. 85 characters including spaces per highlight. (In Word 2007, there is a character count option in the
Review tab, under Word Count. Or, left-click the Word count in the bottom left corner for the character count to pop-up.) Only the core results of the
paper should be covered).
• Title page with author details
• Manuscript without author details
• Cover letter
• Tables (optional)
• Figures (optional)
33
34
The Peer Review Process
Author
Editor
Reviewer
START
Submit a
paper
Basic requirements met?
[Yes]
Assign
reviewers
[No]
REJECT
Revise the
paper
(This and next slides taken from “How to Publish Your Manuscript;
Universität Duisburg-Essen, 25 October 2011)”
Michael Derntl. Basics of Research Paper Writing and Publishing.
http://www.pri.univie.ac.at/~derntl/papers/meth-se.pdf
Collect reviewers’
recommendations
[Reject]
Review and give
recommendation
Make a
decision
[Revision required]
[Accept]
ACCEPT
35
Editor alert
36
Editors‘ and reviewers‘ check
• Article type (full article, review, short/brief report; book
review)
• Content addressing scientific community (psychologists,
behavioral economists)
• Originality of contribution (marginal) contribution to
existing knowledge ?
• Clarity of writing, logical structure and conclusions
• Hypotheses, method, data analyses, conclusions
• Informative and concise presentation
• Formal requirement (title, abstract etc., language;
objectivity and accuracy, brevity of writing and length of
paper, tables & figures, bibliography, etc.)
37
Initial Editorial Review
Many journals adopt the system of initial editorial review. Editors
may reject a manuscript without sending it out for review.
Why?
• The peer-review system is grossly
overloaded and editors wish to use
reviewers only for those papers with a
good probability of acceptance.
• It is a disservice to ask reviewers to spend
time on work that has clearly evident
deficiencies.
(This and next slides taken from “How to Publish Your Manuscript;
Universität Duisburg-Essen, 25 October 2011)”
Michael Derntl. Basics of Research Paper Writing and Publishing.
http://www.pri.univie.ac.at/~derntl/papers/meth-se.pdf
38
39
40
41
What does the acting editor do?
• Set up a timely and confidential review process (anonymous, constructive,
etc.)
• Selects reviewers
– His/her expertise, reference list, your suggestions, SCOPUS,
google.scholar, or ISI on basis of title and keywords
• Oversees the timeline (send reminders to the reviewers)
• Judges if reviews are appropriate
• Determines if the response of the authors is adequate
• Suggest publication, revisions or rejection
This and next slides taken from “How to write a world-class paper?
Personal experiences by Prof. Dr. Rik Leemans, Environmental
Systems Analysis Group (Editor-in-chief Current Opinion in
Environmental Sustainability
42
43
44
Editors check acting editors’ work
45
Decisions
• Accepted with no change (never happened to me)
• Accepted with minor changes (normally, you can
quickly deal with it. It is OK to disagree with reviewers)
• Accepted with major changes (normally, you need time
to deal with it. It is OK to disagree with reviewers)
• Rejected (outside scope; results do not support
conclusions; doesn’t add new knowledge; sloppy
writing, …)
You can complain to editor when results seem unfair,
but …
This and next slides taken from “How to write a world-class paper?
Personal experiences by Prof. Dr. Rik Leemans, Environmental
Systems Analysis Group (Editor-in-chief Current Opinion in
Environmental Sustainability
47
Why revision is important and necessary?
• Which procedure do you prefer?
– Send out a sloppily prepared manuscript  get rejected
after 4-6 months  send out again only a few days later 
get rejected again…  sink into despair
– Take 3-4 months to prepare the manuscript  get the first
decision after 4 months  revise carefully within time
limitation…accepted
Please cherish your own achievements!
(This and next slides taken from “How to Publish Your Manuscript;
Universität Duisburg-Essen, 25 October 2011)”
Michael Derntl. Basics of Research Paper Writing and Publishing.
http://www.pri.univie.ac.at/~derntl/papers/meth-se.pdf
48
Further review of the revised manuscript is
common
Cherish the chance of discussing your work directly with other scientists
in your community. Please prepare a detailed letter of response:
• Cut and paste each comment by the reviewer. Answer it directly
below. Do not miss any point.
• State specifically what changes (if any) you have made to the
manuscript. Give page and line number.
– A typical problem – Discussion is provided but it is not clear what
changes have been made.
• Provide a scientific response to the comment you accept; or a
convincing, solid and polite rebuttal to the point you think the
reviewer is wrong.
• Write in a way that your responses can be given to the reviewer.
(This and next slides taken from “How to Publish Your Manuscript;
Universität Duisburg-Essen, 25 October 2011)”
Michael Derntl. Basics of Research Paper Writing and Publishing.
http://www.pri.univie.ac.at/~derntl/papers/meth-se.pdf
49
How to respond to a review
This and next slides taken from “How to write a world-class paper?
Personal experiences by Prof. Dr. Rik Leemans, Environmental
Systems Analysis Group (Editor-in-chief Current Opinion in
Environmental Sustainability
50
Never treat publication as a lottery
Never resubmit a rejected manuscript directly
to another journal without any significant revision!
It will not save any of your time and energy…
• The original reviewers (even editors) may eventually find it, which can
lead to animosity towards the author.
• A possible strategy
– In your cover letter, declare that the paper was rejected and name
the journal.
– Include the referees’ reports and a detailed letter of response,
showing how each comment has been addressed.
– Explain why you are resubmitting the paper to this journal, e.g.,
this journal is a more appropriate journal; the manuscript has
been improved as a result of its
previous review; etc.
(This and next slides taken from “How to Publish Your Manuscript;
Universität Duisburg-Essen, 25 October 2011)”
Michael Derntl. Basics of Research Paper Writing and Publishing.
http://www.pri.univie.ac.at/~derntl/papers/meth-se.pdf
51
How to write a good paper?
This and next slides taken from “How to write a world-class paper?
Personal experiences by Prof. Dr. Rik Leemans, Environmental
Systems Analysis Group (Editor-in-chief Current Opinion in
Environmental Sustainability
52
What makes a good manuscript?
• Writing a good manuscript is NOT easy. Be prepared to work
hard on it
• A good manuscript makes readers (especially reviewers and
editors) grasp the scientific significance as EASILY as possible
• What makes a good manuscript?
– Cherish your own work – if you do not take care, why
should the journal?
– There is no secret recipe for success – just some simple
rules: dedication and hard work.
– Editors and reviewers are all busy scientists, just like you –
make things easy to save their time!
Excellent presentation is essential
53
What makes a good manuscript?
• Target to your intended audience
• Clear message, which is easy to understand
(abstract & title)
• Introduction should put research into the broader context
and provide a well defined objective
• The innovation must be made explicit
• Well structured and easy to read
• Focused and logical reasoning
• Well referenced
• Clear Figures and Tables
• Clear explanations of symbols and legends
54
Lessons by Rik Leemans
(Environmental sciences)
•
Publishing is one of the necessary steps embedded in the
scientific research process
• Publish new and original results, methods, …(create
innovative tools)
• rationalize (refine or reinterpret) published results,
• review the field or summarize a particular topic
• publish to advance, not to repeat, knowledge and
understanding
• Do not publish reports of no scientific interest, work out of
date, duplications of previously published work, incorrect/not
acceptable conclusions
55
Lessons by Rik Leemans
(Environmental sciences)
• Work with world-class research teams
• Create large databases that are needed by the research
community and distribute them freely
• Contribute to workshops, conferences, etc.
• Create press releases and distribute your papers widely
56
Publish AND Perish! – if you break ethical rules
• International scientific ethics have
evolved over centuries and are
commonly held throughout the world.
• Scientific ethics are not considered to
have national variants or characteristics –
there is a single ethical standard for
science.
• Ethics problems with scientific articles
are on the rise globally.
(This and next slides taken from “How to Publish Your Manuscript;
Universität Duisburg-Essen, 25 October 2011)”
Michael Derntl. Basics of Research Paper Writing and Publishing.
http://www.pri.univie.ac.at/~derntl/papers/meth-se.pdf
57
The article of which the authors committed plagiarism: it won’t be
removed from ScienceDirect. Everybody who downloads it will see
the reason of retraction…
58
Ethics Issues in Publishing
Scientific misconduct
– Falsification of results
Publication misconduct
– Plagiarism
• Different forms / severities
• The paper must be original to the authors
–
–
–
–
–
Duplicate submission
Duplicate publication
Appropriate acknowledgement of prior research and researchers
Appropriate identification of all co-authors
Conflict of interest
(This and next slides taken from “How to Publish Your Manuscript;
Universität Duisburg-Essen, 25 October 2011)”
Michael Derntl. Basics of Research Paper Writing and Publishing.
http://www.pri.univie.ac.at/~derntl/papers/meth-se.pdf
59
Plagiarism Detection
Elsevier is participating in 2 plagiarism detection schemes:
– Turnitin (aimed at universities)
– Ithenticate (aimed at publishers and corporations)
Manuscripts are checked against a database of 20 million peer
reviewed articles which have been donated by 50+ publishers,
including Elsevier. Al post-1009 Elsevier journal content is now
included and the pre-1995 is being steadily added week-byweek
(This and next slides taken from “How to Publish Your Manuscript;
Universität Duisburg-Essen, 25 October 2011)”
Michael Derntl. Basics of Research Paper Writing and Publishing.
http://www.pri.univie.ac.at/~derntl/papers/meth-se.pdf
60
Submitting a paper
• Read and follow journal instructions
• Make sure that your paper is within the scope
of the journal
• Write a clear cover letter
61

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