mason-durie-presentation-tuia-te-ako-2013

Report
Mason Durie
1.
How can full Māori
participation in tertiary
education be achieved ?
2
How can tertiary
education
contribute to the
realisation of
Māori aspirations ?
Tuaropaki Trust

Acquisition of
knowledge and skills

Transfer of
knowledge and skills

Personal gain

Societal gain

Educational merit

Translational merit

Institutional
leadership

Māori leadership

Tertiary education
as an endpoint

Tertiary education
as a means to an
end

How can full Māori
participation in
tertiary education be
achieved ?

How can tertiary
education contribute
to the realisation of
Māori aspirations ?
The Two Questions are
related but the first is
primarily about
student learning while
the second is focussed
on the translation of
TEIs’ broader objectives
into gains for te ao
Māori

Four goals for the first question
(‘… full participation in tertiary education’)
 Māori entry into Tertiary Education
 Māori student success
 Māori staff at all levels and across all TEIs
 Māori knowledge in the curriculum
 Four goals for the second question
(‘..contribute to the realisation of Māori aspirations’)




A well qualified workforce
Flourishing Whānau
Iwi strategies
Māori participation in the globe
Case Studies will
be used to
identify success
factors for both
questions
1.
Māori entry into Tertiary Education
• Tu Toa – bridging the secondary - tertiary divide
2.
Māori student success
• Te Rau Puawai – fostering high student achievement
3.
Māori staff at all levels and in all institutions
• Te Rau Whakapūmau – well qualified Māori academics
4.
Māori knowledge in the curriculum
• MKD – incorporating mātauranga Māori
Participation in Tertiary Education
Bridging the secondary - tertiary divide
 Tertiary Scholarships
 Ngarimu VC Scholarships 1945
 Māori Education Foundation 1960
 Iwi scholarship programmes
 Training Porgrammes
 Teacher Training Colleges
 Hospital based Nursing
 Diversity in Tertiary Education Institutions
 Universities, Polytechnics,
Wānanga, PTEs
 Secondary School Initiatives
Participation in Tertiary Education
TŪ TOA – bridging the secondary - tertiary divide
2005
Integrating Health, Sport, Tikanga &
Whānau Engagement with Education

National Representation in sport

100% NCEA Pass rates

TEI Partnerships

Marae engagement

Progression to Tertiary Education

Established in 1999 at Massey
University

Scholarship Programme

Health-related academic
programme

Extramural students, mostly
working fulltime

Funded by Health Workforce NZ
(formerly Ministry of Health)

Whānau approach to learning

Group commitment to kaupapa
Māori and health

Dedicated core staff
▪ Kirsty Maxwell-Crawford,
▪ Monica Koia, & Robyn Richardson

Regular telephone contact

Academic counselling

Full fee + travel scholarships
Contract
Year Expectations
1999 –
2003
2004 –
2006
2007 –
2009
2010 –
2012
Results
100 graduates by
2003
50 additional
graduates by 2006
30 additional
graduates by 2009
30 additional
graduates by 2012
104
graduates
68
graduates
54
graduates
62
graduates
Total 1999 - 2012
288
Paper Pass Rates
90%
Grade average
B+ - A
47 Masters degrees
5 PhD grads
5 D Clin.Psych grads



Established at MU in 2001
Building Māori academic capacity
Te Mata o te Tau
 (Academy Māori Research & Scholarship)



Enhanced Doctoral programme
Research across a wide range of
subject areas
The Goal:
 25 PhD graduates by the end of decade
one (2010)
 Māori Massey doctoral completions
 1990 – 1999 - 5
 2000 – 2010 - 65
 Academic staff doctorates
 Massey & other TEIs 16
 Subject Areas
 Education, Science, Māori Studies,
Business, History, Nursing, Psychology


Māori in Universities
 Te Reo Māori, Anthropology
 The impact of Whare Whakairo
Wānanga
 Tikanga Māori: curriculum &
pedagogy
A.T. Ngata
Te Rangi
Hiroa
Te Wānanga o
Raukawa
Te Kupenga o
te Mātauranga
Māori focus in various subjects
 E.g. law, health, science, commerce
 Research protocols
 Kaupapa Māori research
Awanui-a -rangi
 PBRF

Aotearoa

Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF)
introduced to measure research outputs in 2003

Māori Knowledge and Development (MKD)
recognised as a separate panel

Based on the methodology used in the research
(rather than the subject area)

Assessed by Māori academics from a range of
TEIs
‘The guiding principle for coverage is that
the panel will consider all evidence
portfolios where there is evidence of
research based on Maori world-views …
and Maori methods of research.’
‘the broad theme areas covered by the panel
will include: te reo Maori, Tikanga Maori,
wairuatanga, cultural development, social
development, economic development,
political development and environmental
sustainability.’
Building on earlier efforts to include te reo
Māori and tikanga Māori within academic
agendas, PBRF has recognised mātauranga
Māori as a distinctive knowledge system that
has merit alongside other systems of
knowledge
1.
A well qualified workforce
• Medical affirmation programme
2.
Families of Mana
• Pāharakeke Research Priority
3.
Iwi strategies
• Hopuhopu MBA
4.
Global participation
• First Nations Futures Institute
Stanford University

Introduced at Otago University Medical
School in 1900

Priority entry for 2 Māori students

The first students:
 Te Rangi Hiroa (Peter Buck) & Tutere Wirepa

Te Rangi Hiroa
Later applied to Auckland University
(Maori and Pacific Admission Scheme - MAPAS)
Tutere Wirepa

1913 2 Māori medical students (1%)

1963 6 Māori medical students (1%)


2013 137 Māori medical students (14%)
Current approach
 Māori students required to have:
 the minimal qualification - 4xBs.
 there is no quota system
 The pass rates are nearly 100%
Jo Baxter
Māori Health
Workforce
Development Unit
Assoc. Prof. Jo Baxter
Māori Learning
Support
Te Huka Matauraka
Pearl Matahika


The rationale for the affirmative
action is not only based on
equitable representation in the
workforce but (more
importantly) on accelerating
gains in Māori health
More Māori doctors may (or
may not) achieve higher
standards of health for Māori
but early evidence is promising.
Peter Tapsell Henry Bennett
Te ORA
Paratene Ngata
Eru Pomare

Nga Pae o te Māramatanga
 Māori Centre of Research Excellence

Established in 2002

Research Priorities 2010
Optimising Māori economic performance
2. Sustaining Māori distinctiveness
3. Fostering Te Pā Harakeke:
understanding, achieving and maintaining
healthy and prosperous families of mana
and the lessons this may hold for New
Zealand families overall.
Linda Tuhiwai
Smith
Michael Walker
1.
Tracey McIntosh
Charles Royal
A Massey University Whanau
Research Programme with
 The Institute for Maori Lifestyle
Advancement (Te Wananga o
Raukawa)
 Committed to a translational
approach


Massey, Wellington
Te Kani Kingi
Aims:
To identify the critical factors that
enable whānau to flourish?
2. To develop strategies that will enable
whānau to flourish.
1.
Nga Purapura,
Te Wānanga o Raukawa

MBA Degree offered at Hopuhopu
in conjunction with Waikato
University

Focus is on Iwi and Māori
development

Students include senior Māori
managers, trustees, corporates

Māori-relevant case studies and
exemplars expose students to a
wide range of Māori leaders (Iwi,
academic, business)
Dr Sarah-Jane Tiakiwai

The Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous
Peoples (46 articles)

Recognises the common bonds between
indigenous peoples across the globe

Has been agreed by the United Nations
‘The Declaration on the Rights of
Indigenous Peoples provides a
global benchmark for indigenous
heritage, justice, and future
planning.’
Article 31
Article 31

1. Indigenous
peoples have the right to:
 maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage,
traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions,
 as well as the manifestations of their sciences, technologies and
cultures,
 including human and genetic resources, seeds, medicines,
knowledge of the properties of fauna and flora, oral
traditions, literatures, designs, sports and traditional games
and visual and performing arts.
 They also have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop
their intellectual property over such cultural heritage, traditional
knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions.
 Kamehamehsa
Schools
 University
Hawaii
of
 Ngai
Tahu &
University of
Canterbury
 Stanford University
 (Woods Institute)

A common mission

To promote the wellbeing of indigenous peoples and their
resources with a particular focus on the natural environment

A common sense of identity

A special and enduring relationship with land and the value system
that flows from that relationship

A common expectation

Tomorrows indigenous leaders will lead our peoples into the 22nd
century and will do so through access to two systems of knowledge
– indigenous knowledge and the knowledge arising from the
academic disciplines of science, economics, humanities,
jurisprudence …


How can full Māori
participation in
tertiary education be
achieved ?
How can tertiary
education contribute
to the realisation of
Māori aspirations ?

High Expectations

Cultural affirmation

Strategic Partnerships

TEI commitment

Kaupapa Champions
Tu Toa
Te Rau
Puawai
Te Rau
Whakapumau
MKD
High expectations
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Cultural affirmation
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Strategic
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TEI commitment
Kaupapa
Champions
Med.
School
entry
Flourishing Hopuhopu Indigenous
Whanau
MBA
Futures
Institute
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Cultural affirmation
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Strategic
Partnerships
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TEI commitment
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Kaupapa Champions
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High expectations
TENA KOUTOU
Two questions about tertiary education
 full Māori participation in tertiary education ?
 tertiary education contribute to te ao Māori ?
Eight case studies identified success factors for:
 Māori participation in tertiary education
 Tertiary education contributions to Māori
Five key themes (success factors) emerged:
* High Expectations
* TEI Commitment
* Cultural affirmation * Kaupapa Champions
* Strategic Partnerships

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