`Maziwa Zaidi`?

Report
Maziwa Zaidi updates
Amos Omore
MilkiT Coordination Meeting
22 Jan 2014, Morogoro, Tanzania
What is ‘Maziwa Zaidi’?
• Coined to domesticate CGIAR Livestock and Fish (LaF)
Program in Tanzania
• It’s a dream for pro-poor transformation of the
Tanzania dairy VC over the next decade++ that is not
‘yet’ fully funded
• The impact pathway for Tanzania dairy VC defines
how to get there
• Seeks to enrol/get buy-in by non-LaF dairy R&D
partners for greater synergy
What is ‘Maziwa Zaidi’?
• Individual projects help us to achieve ‘Maziwa Zaidi’
but they are not singly
• Other rationle:
– Reduce confusion among stakeholders regarding which
projects they are collaborating with,
– Encourage synergy among collaborating projects,
– Rally value chain research and development partners towards
a shared purpose.
What is ‘Maziwa Zaidi’?
‘Maziwa Zaidi’ projects so far:
Name
Donor
PI
Theme
Objective
MilkIT
IFAD
B Mass
Feeds
MoreMilkiT
SFFF2 (ACIAR?)
Irish Aid
BMZ/GIZ
A Omore/L.K
D Grace
VCD
A4HN
Cow Killer
BMZ
CGP
IDRC
S Alonso /D.
Grace
A Galie / (A.
Omore)
Animal
Health/FS
Gender/M&E
Feeds
innovations/IPs
Hubs
Food safety
(nutrition?)
Disease prev
survey
Food security
What is ‘Maziwa Zaidi’?
‘Maziwa Zaidi’ projects proposals/pipeline
Maziwa Zaidi planning
Place of LaF R4D in ‘Maziwa Zaidi’
More milk, income, assets and better health & Nutrition thro’
a) access to quality inputs and services
b) access to reliable, well-coordinated, marketing arrangement
c) access to quality, safe and nutritious products at affordable prices
Scaling out development partnerships
(e.g., EADD2? + +)
Scaling out development partnerships (e.g.,
EADD2)
Research & piloting partnerships (e.g.,
MoreMilkiT, MilkiT; SFFF2; new proposals)
Maziwa Zaidi Strategic Research
Time
10 years
Highlights of progress of Flagship
Project (More MilkiT) and other
integrated projects
More Milk in Tanzania Project
Objectives
(derived from Irish Aid Country Strategy Paper for Tanzania and ASDS)
Goal:
• Inclusive growth and reduced poverty and
vulnerability among dairy-dependent livelihoods in
relevant rural areas in Tanzania
Outcome:
• Rural poor are more income secure through enhanced
access to demand-led dairy market business services
and viable organisational options, and low-income
consumers have better access to affordable milk.
More Milk in Tanzania Project
Contributing Objectives over 5 yrs
1. Develop scalable value chains approaches with improved
organization and institutions serving resource-poor male and
female smallholder dairy households
2. Generate and communicate evidence on business and
organizational options for increasing participation of resourcepoor male and female households in dairy value chains
3. Inform policy on appropriate role for pro-poor smallholderbased informal sector value chains in dairy sector development
More Milk in Tanzania Project
Addressing 4 inter-related problems
that face resource-poor milk producers
1. Dominant direct sales of small
volumes by smallholder
producers that preclude
economies of scale
2. Credit facilities for basic inputs
and services or working capital
are lacking. This discourages
investment to improve
productivity
3. Lack of appropriate
organizational models for precommercial producers (complex
cooperative models and
technology-driven solutions
have largely failed)
4. Seasonality of rainfall and
related effects are strong (with
MilkIT)
Milk marketing outlets
Milk Buyer
(NBS, 2003)
%
Neighbours
86.1
Local market
5.5
Secondary market
0.5
Processors
1.4
Large scale farms
0.2
Trader at farm
4.5
Other
1.7
TOTAL
100.0
More Milk in Tanzania Project
Addressing 4 inter-related problems
that face resource-poor milk producers
1. Dominant direct sales of small
volumes by smallholder
producers that preclude
economies of scale
2. Credit facilities for basic inputs
and services or working capital
are lacking. This discourages
investment to improve
productivity
3. Lack of appropriate
organizational models for precommercial producers (complex
cooperative models and
technology-driven solutions
have largely failed)
4. Seasonality of rainfall and
related effects are strong (with
MilkIT)
Women participate more in milk
related tasks
More Milk in Tanzania Project
Addressing 4 inter-related problems
that face resource-poor milk producers
1. Dominant direct sales of small
volumes by smallholder
producers that preclude
economies of scale
2. Credit facilities for basic inputs
and services or working capital
are lacking. This discourages
investment to improve
productivity
3. Lack of appropriate
organizational models for precommercial producers (complex
cooperative models and
technology-driven solutions
have largely failed)
4. Seasonality of rainfall and
related effects are strong (with
MilkIT)
Milk processing in Tanzania has been declining since 1990
More Milk in Tanzania Project
Addressing 4 inter-related problems
that face resource-poor milk producers
32
30
31 RWANDA
32
33
34
BURUNDI
35 36
29 28 27 26 25 15 14 13
11
UGANDA
12
10
KENYA
MARA
MWANZA
a
KILIMANJARO
MANYARA
7
49
n
OCEAN
D.R.C
Unguja
a
DAR ES SALAAM
y i
RUKWA
k
MOROGORO
PWANI
1
a
41 MUVIWANYA
42 SUA
43 Shambani Graduates
44 New Tabora Dairies
45 ASAS Dairy
46 CEFA Njombe Milk Factory
47 Mbeya Maziwa
48 Vwawa Dairy Cooperative Society
49 Gondi Foods
n g
37 Salari Milk Bar
38 Kashai Milk Bar
39 Kikulula Milk Processing Plant
40 Kayanga Milk Processing Plant
DODOMA
a
36 Mutungi Milk Bar
SINGIDA
T
32 Kyaka Milk Plant
33 Del Food
34 Bukoba Market Milk Bar
35 Bukoba Milk Bar - Soko Kuu
Pemba
TANGA
TABORA
I NDIAN
e
31 Kagera Milk (KADEFA)
MANYARA
46
k
27 Makilagi SSDU
28 Baraki Sisters
29 Mara Milk
30 Mwanza Mini Dairy
8
SHINYANGA
39
19
17 20
16
ARUSHA
40
41
40,000
45,000
1,500
3,000
15,000
3,000
3,000
1,000
1,000
500
500
800
800
800
1,000
1,000
1,000
3,000
4000
16,000
12,000
10,000
1,000
900
600
24
9
KIGOMA
25 Musoma Dairy
26 Utegi Plant (Ex TDL ) (Hakifanyikazi)
6
KAGERA
37 38
L
45
MBEYA
IRINGA
47
ZAMBIA 48
2
46
3
42
43
LINDI
La
ke
Key
N y as a
1. Dominant direct sales of small
volumes by smallholder
producers that preclude
economies of scale
2. Credit facilities for basic inputs
and services or working capital
are lacking. This discourages
investment to improve
productivity
3. Lack of appropriate
organizational models for precommercial producers (complex
cooperative models and
technology-driven solutions
have largely failed)
4. Seasonality of rainfall and
related effects are strong (with
MilkIT)
Less than 5000 litres/day
18
23 21
22
5
4
Processor name
1 Azam Dairy
2 Tommy Dairy (Hakifanyikazi)
3 Tan Dairies
4 Tanga Fresh Ltd
5 Ammy Brothers Ltd
6 Brookside (T) Ltd (Hakifanyikazi)
7 International Dairy Products
8 Mountain Green Dairy
9 Arusha Dairy Company
10 Kijimo Dairy Cooperative
11 Longido (Engiteng)
12 LITI Tengeru
13 Terrat (Engiteng)
14 Orkesumet (Engiteng)
15 Naberera (Engiteng)
16 Nronga Women
17 West Kilimamnjaro
18 Mboreni Women
19 Marukeni
20 Ng'uni Women
21 Kalali Women
22 Same (Engiteng)
RUVUMA
MTWARA
23 Fukeni Mini Dairies
24 Kondiki Small Scale Dairy
5000-30,000 litres/day
More than 40,000 litres/day
MOZAMBIQUE
Milk processing installation 1995-2000. (Total approx. 315,000 l/day)
Installed
capacity
(litres/day)
3,000
15,000
15,000
40,000
2,000
45,000
5,000
1,500
5,000
1,000
500
500
500
500
1,000
3,500
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
1,000
500
3,000
1,200
More Milk in Tanzania Project
Addressing 4 inter-related problems
that face resource-poor milk producers
1. Dominant direct sales of small
volumes by smallholder
producers that preclude
economies of scale
2. Credit facilities for basic inputs
and services or working capital
are lacking. This discourages
investment to improve
productivity
3. Lack of appropriate
organizational models for precommercial producers (complex
cooperative models and
technology-driven solutions
have largely failed)
4. Seasonality of rainfall and
related effects are strong (with
MilkIT)
More Milk in Tanzania Project
Farmer groups are struggling in most places
except in Tanga
750000
700000
650000
600000
550000
500000
450000
400000
350000
300000
250000
200000
150000
100000
50000
0
Nnronga
Year
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
CHAWAMU-Muheza
1994
Volume of Milk (Litres)
Performance of milk collection at Nnronga w omen dairy co-operative Society, Hai
Kilimanjaro and CHAWAMU-Muheza Tanga (1994-2007)
Key messages on identified entry points
• Validity of the need to focus attention on ‘growing’ the
existing informal system of milk production (with zebu
cattle) and marketing to extend the frontiers of
commercial dairying
• Organizational models to achieve economies of scale for
access to inputs and services required to unleash
incentives for raised productivity to levels that will justify
bulking
• This is riskier than classical approaches but more
inclusive in ensuring wider impact on marginalised
• Policy support for pro-poor shift needed
Identified field sites
Hubs for piloting in the Tanzania
context
Dairy Market Hubs (DMHs) with emphasis on improving
access to inputs and services through business
development services (BDS) and check-off
arrangements:
a) DMHs revolving around chilling plants or accessing them (if
under-utilized) through transport arrangements that provide
both outputs marketing and inputs and services through
check-offs;
b) DMHs revolving around check-offs for inputs and services
provided through milk traders; and
c) DMHs revolving around check-offs for inputs and services
provided through cattle traders.
Illustration of a hub for provision of inputs and services
on credit without collective bulking and marketing
Producers
BASIC Dairy Market Hub
for Provision of Inputs and
Services on Check-off
Traders
Milk
Cattle
$$
Payment agreement
Inputs &
Service
Providers
(BDS)
BDS linkages in milk quality assurance in informal
markets (with TDB)
Milk Trader
Training Hygienic
guides
cans
Regulatory
Authority
Accreditation & monitoring
Reporting
Training
Service
Providers
(BDS)
(Trialled in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania (Arusha & Mwanza)
DDF update:
It is evolving and continuing to catalyze policy
dialogue for a pro-poor transformation of the
dairy value chain…
MoreMilkiT update:
• R&D partnerships formed for piloting
have started to mobilize value chain
actors for piloting of interventions
MoreMilkiT update:
Range of partnerships :
1. Strategic Research Partnerships
• SUA
• TALIRI
 Reinforced by CGIAR (ILRI/CIAT)
and ARIs partnerships
2. Development Partnerships
• Servicing the system: Heifer and SNV
• From the system: TDB, FAIDA MaLi
3. Mechanisms for strengthening
relationships
• DDF
• Local platforms
Criteria for becoming a dairy market hub defined
DMH category
a): Collective bulking and sale of
milk by members of a farmers
group
Criteria for becoming a DMH
Farmers group
i) is registered at district level
ii) has at least 1 link with a milk trader/ buyer and at least 1 link
with an input & services provider
iii) members are able to access inputs & services on check off
system
b) and c): Individual members of Farmers group
a farmers group sell milk and/or i) is registered at district level
cattle directly to traders
ii) members are able to access inputs & services on check off
system
Hub for provision of inputs and
services on credit without collective
bulking and marketing
Impact pathway and MLE developed
• Monitoring, learning and evaluation
(MLE) framework) developed
• Several targeted research activities and
ex-ante assessment of interventions
initiated, some through students
Baseline (benchmark) results available
• Most findings re-affirm VCA findings, with
figures
• It’s mostly about feed, less so other
constraints!
1. Dominant direct sales of small volumes by smallholder producers that
preclude economies of scale
2. Credit facilities for basic inputs and services or working capital are
lacking. This discourages investment to improve productivity
3. Lack of appropriate organizational models for pre-commercial
producers (complex cooperative models and technology-driven
solutions have largely failed)
4. Seasonality of rainfall and related effects are strong (with MilkIT ++)
MoreMilkiT: Main Successes and challenges
Successes
• Entry points for piloting of interventions identified, the project
is now ready for take-off
• Early success in preparing for impact in the dairy value chain in
Tanzania in the long-term through DDF and ‘Maziwa Zaidi’
value chain transformation agenda
Challenges
• Lengthy bureaucracies in reaching agreements with partners
• Delays in recruiting additional staff
• Innovating for inclusive upgrading of dairy value chains is
riskier but has more potential for wider impact
In support of:
CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish
livestockfish.cgiar.org
CGIAR is a global partnership that unites organizations engaged in research for a food secure future. The CGIAR
Research Program on Livestock and Fish aims to increase the productivity of small-scale livestock and fish systems
in sustainable ways, making meat, milk and fish more available and affordable across the developing world.

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