controller - GENI Wiki

Report
Using OpenFlow and Orbit to
Achieve Mobility in a
Heterogeneous Wireless Network
Ryan Izard
[email protected]
GREE-SC2014
Iowa State University
Sponsored by the National Science Foundation
Outline
1. A brief overview of software defined
networking (SDN) and OpenFlow (OF)
2. OF controller and OF switch software
components and interaction
3. The Floodlight (FL) OF controller
4. Achieving IP Mobility with OF
5. Tutorial / Walk-through
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What is Software Defined
Networking and OpenFlow?
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What is SDN?
• Physical separation of network control plane
from forwarding/data plane
• Network control
– Centrally managed
– Directly programmable
• Network infrastructure
– Abstracted from applications
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How Does SDN Work?
API Feature A
API Feature B
API Feature C
Network Operating System
Packet Forwarding
Packet Forwarding
Packet Forwarding
Packet Forwarding
Packet Forwarding
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What Is OpenFlow?
• Link between SDN
control and
infrastructure layers
• OF-enabled
infrastructure
communicates with
an OF controller via
the OF protocol
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How Does OF Work?
User Applications
Network Services
Custom Services
APIs
OpenFlow Controller
Packet Forwarding
Packet Forwarding
Packet Forwarding
Packet Forwarding
Packet Forwarding
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Basic SDN
packet handling
example
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Basic SDN
packet handling
example
User 1
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User 2
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Basic SDN
packet handling
example
User 1
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User 2
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OpenFlow Switches and
Controllers
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time
Bottom-Up: An OF-Enabled Switch
1. Power On
2. Bootloader
3. OF-Enabled OS
Control Path
OpenFlow
Data Path / Switching Hardware
Flow Table
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OF Switch Connection to Controller
Network Services
Custom Services
APIs
OpenFlow Controller (e.g. Floodlight, NOX, etc.)
OS (e.g. Linux, Mac, Windows, etc.)
Hardware
Control Path
OpenFlow
Data Path / Switching Hardware
Flow Table
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OF Switch Connection to Controller
• Switch probes for controller
– Configured with controller IP/port (6633/6653)
– Connection established via TCP/TLS
– Standalone or secure modes
• Controller can learn topology
– Packet-out LLDP
– Devices and other participating OF switches
discovered and mapped
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Application Connection to Controller
Application Requesting Controller Service(s)
Interface to Controller (e.g. REST)
OS (e.g. Linux, Mac, Windows, etc.)
Hardware
Network Services
Custom Services
APIs
OpenFlow Controller (e.g. Floodlight, NOX, etc.)
OS (e.g. Linux, Mac, Windows, etc.)
Hardware
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Application Connection to Controller
• Controller-dependent
• Floodlight provides REST API
– JSON
– Modify or query running configuration
– Expandable with custom modules
• Options are vast with open-source
– Customize controller APIs and behavior
– User-application-independent (e.g. a transparent
network service like SOS)
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The Floodlight OpenFlow Controller
• Open-source OF controller
• Sponsored and supported
by Big Switch Networks
• Written in Java and easily
used with Eclipse
• Modifiable and
expandable to suit any
application via modules
• Large developer
community and support
group
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Floodlight Modules
• What is a Floodlight (FL) module?
– FL service that reacts to switch/controller
events, manages running switches, and/or
manages controller configuration
– Java package
– FL ships with many modules, but custom
modules are supported
• Modules can work collaboratively and be
chained to achieve desired results
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time
Floodlight Architecture
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Execute
Parse module list
Load modules
Start REST service
Start FL Provider
Service (Core)
FL Modules (e.g. Forwarding, DHCP, Your_Module, etc.)
FL Provider Service
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REST Service
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Floodlight Architecture
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Customizing Floodlight Behavior
• Off-the-shelf, the FL controller mimics
traditional learning switch behavior for all
connected switches
• Custom modules allow for advanced SDN
applications/behaviors
– SOS, HetNet Mobility, GENI Cinema, etc.
– Add your custom modules here too!
• REST API allows third party apps to query
and modify the running configuration of FL
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How can Software Defined
Networking and OpenFlow
be Used to Achieve a
Vertical Handover?
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• Part I: Design/Setup
– Use OpenFlow to perform L2 handoff
• Part II: Execute
– Configure and initialize software and scripts
– Execute handoff experiment
• Part III: Finish
– Determine results
– Kill processes
– Shutdown node and logout
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Mobility Over
Heterogeneous Networks
• Provide mobility for clients over IPv4
• Entirely SDN and OF-based solution
– Network-level
• Migration detection
• IP address assignment and management
• Packet routing
– Client-level
• Packet routing
• Interface switching
• Transparent service to application
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Mobility Over
Heterogeneous Networks
• Network-Level, Mobile IP:
– Home/Foreign Agents OpenFlow Controller
– Mobile IP tunnels OpenFlow flows
– DHCP server on OpenFlow controller
• Client-Level, Vertical Handoff:
– Change physical interface  broken socket
– Open vSwitch + Floodlight OF controller
• Manage the physical interfaces via SDN
• End-user sees “always-up” virtual interface
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Client Connects to WiMAX
Client-Level
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Client Connects to WiMAX
Network-Level
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Client Uses WiMAX Network
Network-Level
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Client Migrates
Network-Level
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Client Switches to WiFi Interface
Client-Level
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Network Responds to Handover
Network-Level
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Client Connection Rerouted to WiFi
Network-Level
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Client-Level
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Mobility Over
Heterogeneous Networks
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• Part I: Design/Setup
– Use OpenFlow to perform L2 handoff
• Part II: Execute
– Configure and initialize software and
scripts
– Execute handoff experiment
• Part III: Finish
– Determine results
– Kill processes
– Shutdown node and logout
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Configure Experiment
• Experiment is a simple ping to demonstrate a vertical
handoff between a WiFi and a WiMAX interface on a
node in the Orbit grid testbed
• Detailed instructions:
– http://groups.geni.net/geni/wiki/GENIExperimenter/Tutorials/
WiMAXOpenFlow
• GREE-SC2014 group and node assignments:
– http://tinyurl.com/greesc2014-d7-node-info
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Configure Experiment
• Enable WiMAX for your GENI project
–
–
–
–
–
Login to GENI at portal.geni.net
Scroll down to the Tools section and select WiMAX
Select the button to enable WiMAX for your project (GREESC14)
Click Submit
Note your username
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Configure Experiment
• You should be able to login to the Orbit testbed
for your project
– eval `ssh-agent –s`
– ssh-add /path/to/private/key
• Open two separate terminal windows and
in each SSH to Orbit
– ssh [email protected]
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Configure Experiment
•
Load AP image onto node
– omf load -o 1200 -i rizard-greesc2014ap.ndz -t node11-11
•
Load Server image onto node
– omf load -o 1200 -i rizard-greesc2014server.ndz -t node10-10
•
Load Client image onto node
– omf load -o 1200 -i rizard-greesc2014client.ndz -t <client-node>
•
Power off and boot nodes
– omf tell -a offh -t node11-11,node1010,<client-node>
– omf tell -a on -t node11-11,node1010,<client-node>
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Configure Experiment
•
Setup AP node (Already done for GREE-SC2014)
– ssh [email protected]
– Start: ./gec20_setup_ap.sh
•
Setup Server node (Already done for GREE-SC2014)
– ssh [email protected]
– Start: ./StartupScripts/gec20_setup.sh
– ARP: ./StartupScripts/arp_add_list.sh
•
Setup Client node – Your Turn!
– ssh [email protected]<client-node>
– Disable Floodlight’s forwarding module
– Configure startup and switching scripts
– Start: ./StartupScripts/gec20_setup.sh
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• Part I: Design/Setup
– Use OpenFlow to perform L2 handoff
• Part II: Execute
– Configure and initialize software and scripts
– Execute handoff experiment
• Part III: Finish
– Determine results
– Kill processes
– Shutdown node and logout
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Execute Experiment
1) WiFi flows are installed as “initial flows” when setup
script is run.
2) In a new terminal, start a ping to the server IP,
10.41.105.105. The packets will be switched out the
WiFi interface.
3) Run the WiMAX switching script. The ping packets will
be switched out the WiMAX interface.
./SwitchingScripts/gec20_switch_to_wimax.sh
4) You’ve performed a handoff! Want proof? View the
flows and packet counts on each OVS bridge before
and after an interface-switch.
5) Alternate inferfaces and switch back to WiFi.
./SwitchingScripts/gec20_switch_to_wifi.sh
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• Part I: Design/Setup
– Use OpenFlow to perform L2 handoff
• Part II: Execute
– Configure and initialize software and scripts
– Execute handoff experiment
• Part III: Finish
– Determine results
– Kill processes
– Shutdown node and logout
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Teardown Experiment
• When the experiment is done, on the Client
node stop the Floodlight controller, stop OVS:
./StartupScripts/gec20_teardown.sh
• On the Server node:
./StartupScripts/gec20_teardown.sh
• Exit all SSH connections to nodes and power off
resources:
omf tell -a offh -t all
• Exit Orbit console SSH connections.
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