The Life Safety Code 2013 - the Healthcare Facilities Management

Report
Managing the Physical Environment
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Healthcare Facility Managers Society of New Jersey
Thursday, June 20, 2013
A program presented by:
Robert H. Bartels, CHFM CHSP CHEP FASHE
President & Founder
SAFETY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC.
(877) 577-6550 ** [email protected]
© SMS, Inc., 2013
1
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Suites
Concept: Use of suites can alleviate some
complex & costly code deficiencies. Falls
under 19.2.5 & 18.2.5 “Arrangement of
Means of Egress”
Premise: Every habitable room shall have
an exit access door leading directly to an
exit access corridor.
2
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Suites
Issue:
*
*
*
*
Size
# Exits
# Intervening Rooms
Travel Distance
3
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Suites
Issue:
* Size & Exits
- Patient Sleeping
- 1,000 SF
- 5,000 SF
- Non-Sleeping
- 2,500 SF
- 10,000 SF
4
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Suites
Issue:
* Size & Exits
- Patient Sleeping
- 1,000 SF requires single
exit
- 5,000 SF requires 2 exits
(must be remote in new)
5
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Suites
Issue:
* Size & Exits
- Non-Sleeping
- 2,500 SF requires single
exit
- 10,000 SF requires 2 exits
(must be remote in new)
6
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Suites
Issue:
* Intervening Rooms & Travel Distance
- Patient Sleeping – permitted only by
exceptions
- Non-Sleeping – one with travel
distance of 100’ or less; two with travel
distance of 50’ or less
- Intervening room may not be through
hazardous area
7
© SMS, Inc., 2013
8
© SMS, Inc., 2013
9
© SMS, Inc., 2013
10
© SMS, Inc., 2013
11
© SMS, Inc., 2013
12
© SMS, Inc., 2013
13
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Code Problems In New Construction
Concept: Newly constructed buildings
should be fully compliant
Premise: Buildings are designed by
qualified Architects & Engineers, then site
reviewed by regulators
14
© SMS, Inc., 2013
15
15
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Code Problems In New Construction
Issue: How is it possible to end up with
code violations after this process & what
are the violations commonly identified
after taking possession of a new building?
16
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Code Problems In New Construction
- Why do they occur?
- Complexity of codes
- Lack of LSC knowledge
- Time is money
- Value engineering
- User influence
17
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Code Problems In New Construction
Issue: Common Violations
- Not full sprinkler protection
- Utilities in exit stairs
- Improper exit discharge
- Oversize suites or exit issues
- Inadequate building separation
18
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Code Problems In New Construction
Issue: Common Violations
- Room door swing into exit
corridors
- Wall projections
- Stair width
- Shaft enclosure
- Improper fire stopping
19
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Room Door Swing
Concept: Doors from rooms should not
interfere with exit corridors. Falls under
7.2.1.4.4 “Swing and Force to Open”
Premise: “During its swing, any door in a
means of egress shall leave not less than onehalf of the required width of an aisle, corridor,
passageway, or landing unobstructed and
shall not project more than 7 in. into the
required width of an aisle, corridor,
passageway, or landing, when fully open.”
20
© SMS, Inc., 2013
21
21
© SMS, Inc., 2013
22
22
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Room Door Swing
Issue: We find frequent instances where
doors swing into egress corridors in new
and existing buildings. In many cases
these doors do not swing fully open due to
door closers not opening 180 degrees, &
due to objects interfering with their full
opening such as handrails, soap/gel
dispensers, lights, fire extinguishers, etc.
23
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Fire Door Latching
Concept: Pairs of rated fire doors require
positive latching to maintain their rating. The
Code identifies specific # of latches for specific
size and type doors
Premise: The number of latches required for
a specific size Tin Clad Fire Doors can be found
in section 3.4 of NFPA 80, Fire Doors &
Windows under table 3-4.3.3(a)
24
© SMS, Inc., 2013
25
© SMS, Inc., 2013
26
© SMS, Inc., 2013
27
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Fire Door Latching
Issue: Tin Clad Fire Doors up to 6’6” in
height require 2 latches & doors over 6’6”
require 3 latches. Doors over 8’6” to 10’6”
require 4 latches. Often the receptacle for
the bottom latch has been removed from
the floor. Also, many 6’6” fire doors are
installed with only the top latch.
28
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Fire Dampers
Concept: When an air duct penetrates multiple
floors it is typically required to be enclosed with 1
or 2 hour fire resistive construction & provided
with fire dampers where the duct penetrates the
shaft wall
Premise: “Fire dampers shall be installed at each
direct or ducted opening into or out of enclosures
required by 3-3.4.1.” Falls under NFPA 90A 1999
edition “Shafts”.
29
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Fire Dampers
Issue: Frequent improper installation of
fire dampers in new & existing
construction including:
• Improper floor line installation
• Improper wall installation
• Improperly sealed penetrations
30
© SMS, Inc., 2013
31
31
822 - DAMPER
© SMS, Inc., 2013
32
32
© SMS, Inc., 2013
33
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Locking Doors In Means Of Egress
Concept: Occasionally, for clinical safety reasons,
a door in a means of egress may need to be
locked. Falls under “Means of Egress
Requirements”
Premise: The code states “Doors within a
required means of egress shall not be equipped
with a latch or lock that requires the use of a tool
or key from the egress side. There are 3
exceptions.
34
© SMS, Inc., 2013
35
35
© SMS, Inc., 2013
36
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Locking Doors In Means of Egress
Issue: Hospitals have a long history of
locking certain high risk areas (particularly
L&D & Newborn Nurseries) with nonconforming locking arrangements.
37
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Fire Alarm Pull Box Locations
Concept: Fire alarm pull boxes should be
located in the normal path of egress & near
exits. Falls under NFPA 72 1999 edition.
Premise: Fire alarm boxes should be located
within 5’ of exits, the top of the device should
not be more than 54” from the floor & travel
distance to a box should not be more than
200’.
38
© SMS, Inc., 2013
39
39
© SMS, Inc., 2013
40
40
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Fire Alarm Pull Box Locations
Issue: Frequent findings of
- Pull boxes mounted too high
- Pull boxes over 5’ from exit
- Horizontal exits w/o pull boxes
- Mechanical room distances >200
41
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
“Tying-off” to Sprinkler Systems
Concept: “Sprinkler piping or hangers shall
not be used to support non-system
components.” Falls under NFPA 13, 1999
edition.
Premise: Designs for hanging sprinkler piping
are based only on the weight of the water
filled pipe & a safety factor, not extra weight.
42
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Tying-off to Sprinkler Systems
Issue: Items supported by or on sprinkler
piping is all to common a finding. It is even
more problematic in older systems that
have endured the effects of time &
vibration for many years. TJC & CMS have
become more aggressive in recent years in
looking for this issue.
43
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Corridor Walls
Concept: Corridors in hospitals must
be separated from rooms by compliant
partitions
Premise: “Corridors shall be separated from
all other areas by partitions complying with
19.3.6.2 through 19.3.6.3” Falls under NFPA
101, 2000 edition.
44
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Corridor Walls
•
•
•
•
Smoke Barriers per Chapter Requirements
Smoke Doors
Smoke Dampers
Penetrations
© SMS, Inc., 2013
45
830 – ABOVE CEILING CABLING
© SMS, Inc., 2013
46
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Corridor Walls
Issue:
- New Construction vs. Existing
- Sprinklered vs. Non-Sprinklered
- Code exceptions
- Appendix clarifications
47
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Corridor Doors
Concept: Corridors in hospitals must be
separated from rooms by compliant doors.
Premise: Doors protecting corridor
openings in other than enclosures of
vertical openings, exits, or other hazardous
areas shall be substantial doors…
48
© SMS, Inc., 2013
49
The Life Safety Code
Myths, Misconceptions & Opportunities
Corridor Doors
Issue:
-
Latching
Kick Plates
Frames
Louvers, transoms, transfer grills
Undercuts
50
© SMS, Inc., 2013
51
© SMS, Inc., 2013
52
© SMS, Inc., 2013
53

similar documents