Diagnosing Reading Problems: What do your students need?

Report
DIAGNOSING READING
PROBLEMS: WHAT DO YOUR
STUDENTS NEED?
TRAINING OVERVIEW
RTI model of reading
 Taking DIBELS to the next level

Using new accuracy formula
 Pile protocol


Using a diagnostic screener (DDS)
Administering & scoring the DDS
 Using the data to diagnose specific areas of need


Next steps
LEARNING TARGETS
I can say what RTI means.
 I can use the pile protocol to find students that
need extra instruction.
 I can administer and score the DDS diagnostic
screener
 I know what to do with the DDS diagnostic
screener after I have my student’s scores.
 I know what my next steps are for administering
an intervention model in my classroom or
building.

RTI MODEL
RTI
RTI is not a program, it’s a
philosophy/tool/framework
 RTI stands for Response To Intervention
(sometimes Response to Instruction)
 In the past, we’ve had a “wait to fail” model. RTI
is Preventative Model

RTI CORE PRINCIPLES
Use all available resources to teach all students –
minimize silos
 Universal screening for prevention instead of
waiting for intervention
 Multi-tier model of service delivery
 Explicit & systematic instruction
 Data based decisions using a problem solving or
standard protocol approach
 Monitor student progress frequently
 Multiple assessment measures
 Monitoring implementation fidelity

3 TIERED MODEL
Tier 3:
Students
who need
intensive or
individualized support.
5%
Tier 2:
Students who do not make
progress in Tier 1 are provided
with more intensive interventions
15%
Tier 1:
All students receive high quality
instruction as well as regular progress
monitoring
80%
3 TIERED MODEL
Tier 3:
Tier 2:
Tier 1:
District Adopted Curriculum (Read Well or Reading Street)
90 minutes at Instructional Level
Scientifically Based Practices
Data Driven Decision Making (Progress Monitoring)
Differentiated Instruction
3 TIERED MODEL
Tier 3:
Tier 2:
Pull aside
Added practice outside the 90 minutes
20-30 minute additional instruction
Data Driven Decision Making (progress monitoring)
Scientifically based practices
District Adopted Intervention Materials
Use data to make decisions
Pull aside
Tier 1:
3 TIERED MODEL
Tier 3:
Replacement “Core”
Scientifically based practices
Data Driven Decision Making
(progress monitoring)
Tier 2:
Tier 1:
RTI
In an RTI/Intervention model, students do not
stay in intervention groups forever. Every 4-6
weeks, use assessment to re-group.
 RTI is not for everyone, it’s for the kids who need
it.
 The nature of the intervention changes at each
tier, becoming more rigorous as the student
moves through the tiers
 Students move up and down the tiers depending
on need

WHY WE’RE REALLY DOING THIS
Students speak to us
through their data. It is
up to us to hear what they
are telling us and do
something about it!
USING DIBELS TO HELP
DETERMINE STUDENT NEEDS
WHAT ARE THE SUBTESTS?
Dibels Indicators
5 Essential Components
Letter Naming Fluency (LNF)
Tied to Alphabetic Principle
Initial Sound Fluency (ISF)
Phonemic Awareness
Phoneme Segmentation Fluency
(PSF)
Phonemic Awareness
Nonsense Word Fluency (NWF)
Phonics
Oral Reading Fluency (ORF)
Fluency
Retell Fluency
Comprehension**
WHAT DO THE SCORES MEAN?
Reading fluently with comprehension is the
ultimate goal.
 DIBELS uses early skills (LNF, PSF, NWF, ORF)
to predict how likely it is a child will be a strong
reader later.
 Students must achieve or exceed goals on time to
be on track for successful reading.

WHAT DO THE SCORES MEAN?


When you see a DIBELS report, you will see a
raw score for each student as well as:
Intensive
At Risk
Deficit
Strategic
Some Risk
Emerging
Benchmark
Low Risk
Established
A child’s score will determine if they are
Intensive, Strategic, or Benchmark.
DIBELS MARKINGS IN TACOMA
DIBELS Scoring Cheat Sheet
Timing
Hesitation
Prompt
Discontinue
Scoring Tips*
Letter Naming
Fluency (LNF)
Start timing after
saying “Begin”
and stop at 1
minute. (])
After 3 seconds,
provide the correct
letter name and point
to the next letter and
say, “What letter?”
(prompt may be
repeated)
“Remember to tell
me the letter name
and not the sound.”
(One time only)
No letters correct
in the first row
(10 letters).
Draw a line through a
skipped row and do not
count in scoring.
Initial Sound
Fluency (ISF)
Start timing after
question and stop
when student
responds.
After 5 seconds,
“Remember to tell
score as 0 and present me the picture that
next question.
begins with the
sound ___.”
Score of 0 on first
5 questions.
Record number of
seconds and calculate the
fluency score.
Phoneme
Segmentation
Fluency
Start timing when After 3 seconds,
first word is
provide next word.
presented and stop
at 1 minute. (])
(PSF)
Nonsense Word
Fluency (NWF)
Start timing after
saying “Begin”
and stop at 1
minute. (])
After 3 seconds, score the sound/word as
incorrect and provide the correct
sound/word. If necessary, point to the next
sound/word, and say, “What sound/word?”*
Depends on whether student is reading
“sound by sound” or “word by word”.
DIBELS Oral Start timing after After 3 seconds,
provide the next
Reading Fluency student says first
word and stop at 1 word.
(DORF)
minute. (])
“Remember to tell
me the sounds in
the word.”
Marking
t L s u
0
1
No correct sound If student repeats the
/t/ /r/ /i/ /k/ 4/4
segments in first 5 entire word with no
/k/ /a/ /t/ 2/3
words.
segmentation, circle the
word and do not give any /t/ /r/ /i/ /k/ 0/3
points.
No correct sounds
in first 5 words.
No words read
correct in first
row.
Draw a line through a
skipped row and do not
count in scoring.
Three passages
administered and median
(middle) score recorded.
tob
3/3
tob
3/3
tob
2/3
It was a live fish. 4/5
tt
It was a live fish. 4/5
THE IMPORTANCE OF ACCURACY
Accuracy is a piece/ one aspect used to determine
instructional decisions.
 Why do we look at accuracy? Research and
examples

DIBELS ORF scores at the end of second grade.
(Benchmark is 90 wcpm.)
 Billy reads 85 wcpm with no errors.
 Sally reads 112 wcpm with 8 errors.
 Which student is more likely to have strong
comprehension? Which student is more likely to have
decoding issues?

ACCURACY PERCENTAGES
1st Grade
2nd Grade
3rd -5thGrade
Winter
Spring
Fall
Winter
Spring
Fall
Winter
Spring
Frustration
<75%
<85%
<87%
<90%
<90%
<90%
<90%
<90%
Instruction
75%-79%
85%-89%
87%-91%
90%-94%
90%-96%
90%-96%
90%-96%
90%-96%
Independent
80%+
90%+
92%+
95%+
97%+
97%+
97%+
97%+
WHAT DO SCREENING DATA TELL US?



WCPM and accuracy scores below benchmark
screening data indicate that a student may not be
reading well enough to have strong
comprehension.
Screening data answer the question: Is the
student reading with appropriate rate and
accuracy to indicate adequate
comprehension?
The ‘Pile Protocol’ allows us to determine which
students need further diagnostic assessment
PILE PROTOCOL

Using DIBELS ORF scores and accuracy, you can
make piles of student books based on the
following criteria:
Strong Readers
Slow Rate
Readers
Readers w/ Mild
Decoding Issues
Readers w/
Moderate
Decoding Issues
Readers w/
Significant
Decoding Issues
Rate score > ___WCPM
Rate score < ___WCPM
Rate score > ___WCPM
Rate score < __WCPM
Rate score <__WCPM
Accuracy score > 97%
Accuracy score > 97%
Accuracy score of
90-96%
Accuracy score < 90%
Accuracy score of
90-96%
Strong Readers
Rate score > ____WCPM
+
Accuracy score > 97%
Student
Rate
Slow Rate Readers
Rate score < ____WCPM
+
Accuracy score > 97%
Acc
Student
Rate
Readers w/ Mild Decoding Issues
Rate score > ____WCPM
+
Accuracy score 90- 96%
Acc
Student
Rate
Acc
Readers w/ Moderate Decoding Issues
Rate score < ____WCPM
+
Accuracy score of 90-96%
Student
Rate
Acc
Readers w/ Significant Decoding Issues
Rate score < ____WCPM
+
Accuracy score < 90%
Student
Rate
Acc
PILE PROTOCOL: PRACTICE
Student Name
ORF/Rate
Score
Accuracy
Jenn
45
81%
Leo
40
87%
Juan
63
80%
Donald
68
89%
Vicki
56
90%
Luella
78
90%
Diego
82
95%
Eric
85
96%
Samantha
75
99%
Juanita
76
98%
Miguel
90
99%
Significant/Severe
decoding issues
Moderate
Decoding Issues
Mild Decoding
Issues
Slow Rate
Readers
Strong Readers
FURTHER DIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT

Students who meet both WCPM and accuracy
percentage benchmarks on the Oral Reading
Fluency screening assessment (Strong Readers):
Do not need diagnostic assessment
 Do not need intervention


Students who do not meet BOTH WCPM and
accuracy percentage benchmarks (Moderate
Decoding Issues and Significant/Severe Decoding
Issues) should receive diagnostic assessment to
pinpoint area(s) of weaknesses.

Areas of weakness will guide instructional planning
and instruction.
DECODING IS ESSENTIAL FOR READING
COMPREHENSION AT ALL AGES

Assess decoding abilities first

If students cannot decode well and easily, reading
fluency and comprehension will be hindered even if
the students have strong vocabularies and
comprehension
WHAT DO YOUR STUDENTS DO WHEN
THEY DON’T KNOW HOW TO DECODE?
Skip words
 Add words
 Misread vowels (bench for bunch)
 Guess based on context (mom for mother)
 Misread multi-syllabic words
 Misread or skip articles (in, of, the, to, etc.)

These errors will lead to comprehension
mistakes…not always, but sometimes.
WHY STUDENTS IN HIGHER GRADES HAVE
DECODING PROBLEMS


Problems often don’t show up until higher grades
because students guessed successfully in the
early grades when words are easy to guess.
Older students experience less and less success
with guessing as text becomes more difficult.
BEGIN DIAGNOSIS OF READING DIFFICULTIES
BY ASSESSING DECODING ABILITIES

Even with WCPM and Accuracy Percentage
scores, we don’t know why students are having
difficulties.
Comprehension
Vocabulary
Decoding
STUDENTS NEED TO READ WORDS IN
ISOLATION IN ORDER TO IDENTIFY DECODING
WEAKNESSES


Reading carefully selected real and nonsense
words in isolation is an efficient diagnostic
assessment.
Examine error patterns to determine the specific
confusions and the depth of the weaknesses.
CHECK IN

Turn to your partner and tell them how you’ve
met these learning targets so far:
I say what RTI means.
 I can use the accuracy formula and pile protocol to
find students that need extra instruction.

ADMINISTERING THE
DIAGNOSTIC DECODING SURVEY
DIAGNOSTIC DECODING SURVEYS

Your Diagnostic Decoding Surveys includes:
Beginning and Advanced Decoding Surveys
 Summary Directions for Administration and Scoring
 Blank Recording Forms
 Student Pages

BEGINNING DECODING SURVEY

Beginning Decoding Skills

Beginning decoding skills include the ability to read
words with:
Short vowels
 Digraphs
 Blends


The Beginning Decoding Survey also includes high
frequency words that do not have short vowels.
Beginning Decoding Survey
50 Very Easy, One-Syllable Words
Words and Sentences to Read
Set 1
see
one
they
you
are
•5 real words with short vowels & 3 letters
rag
lid
dot
hum
bet
•5 real words with short vowels & 4 letters
rich
shop
tack
quit
moth
dust
step
trip
pond
brag
•5 high frequency words
(digraphs)
•5 real words with short vowels & 4 letters
_____________________________________________________
Set 2
1. The cat hid in a box.
(blends)
2. The fresh fish is still on the wet grass.
•22 one-syllable words in sentences:
short vowels & high frequency words
3. Six flat shells were in my bath.
_____________________________________________________
Set 3
•8 nonsense words with short vowels
•4 with 3 letters
•4 with 4 letters (digraphs)
vop
yud
zin
keb
Shap
thid
chut
weck
Words and Sentences to Read
Administering and Scoring The
Beginning Decoding Survey
(Summary directions are available in your DDS)
Administering the Survey:
1. Ask the student to read the words and sentences on
the Student Page.
2. Use the Recording Form to record student’s responses:
•
Put a check by words the student reads correctly.
•
Write exactly what the student says when
reading a word incorrectly.
Recording Form
Scoring the Survey:
1. Total the number of words read correctly.
2. Complete the Error Grid by marking all columns that
describe the student’s error when reading a word. You
can complete the grid after the student reads the
words and sentences.
3. Total the marks in each error column.
Error Types -
Error types are listed at the top
and bottom of the columns on the
Error Grid
•No Try: Mark only when a student does not attempt to read a word.
•Sight Word: Mark when a student misreads a sight word.
•Sound Added or Omitted: Mark when a student attempts to read
a word, but adds or omits a sound. This is a ‘guesser’ column because
students only add or omit sounds when they are guessing.
•Initial Consonant: Mark when a student misreads or omits the
initial consonant.
•Final Consonant: Mark when a student misreads or omits the
final consonant. This is a ‘guesser’ column because students who are
confused by the vowel often guess at the final consonant sounds.
•Short Vowel: Mark when a student misreads a short vowel.
•Consonant Digraph & qu: Mark when a student misreads or
omits a digraph or qu.
•Blend: Mark when a student misreads or omits reading any part of
a blend.
DIGRAPHS AND BLENDS REMINDERS

Digraphs are two letters that spell one sound.

Common consonant digraphs on the Surveys:






sh – sh e
ch – ch ap
wh – wh ip
th – th en OR th umb
ck – ba ck
Blends are two consonant letters together, each with
its own sound.

A few blends on the Surveys are:




st – mu s t, s t op
tr – t r ap
nd – ba n d
br – b r at
SCORING RULES – SINGLE HIGH
FREQUENCY WORDS
•Check (√) words read correctly.
•Write NT (for no try) if the student does not attempt the word.
•Put ‘x’s in both the “No Try” and the “Sight Word” boxes on the grid.
•If student misreads a word, write the response.
•Put an ‘x’ in the “Sight Word” box on the grid, and do not put ‘x’s in
any other boxes.
•If the student responds twice, write both responses and put one ‘x’ in
the “Sight Word” box on the grid.
•Write ‘SC’ if the student self-corrects.
•Self-corrections count as errors.
•Put an ‘x’ in the “Sight Word” box on the grid.
SCORING RULES – SINGLE DECODABLE
WORDS
•Check (√) words read correctly.
•If students misread words, write all responses.
•If the student responds twice, write both responses.
•Put ‘x’s in Error Grid boxes for all errors in both words.
•Write NT (for no try) if the students does not attempt the word.
•Put an ‘x’ in the “No Try” box on the Error Grid. (No ‘x’ is in the Sound Added/Omitted
box because that column is for Sounds Added/Omitted within a word.)
•Put ‘x’s in all applicable boxes on the Error Grid. (These boxes have ‘x’s because the
student did not read any part of the word.
•Write SC if the student self-corrects.
•Self-corrections count as errors when totaling number of Words Read Correctly.
•Mark all errors in the misread words, even if the student self-corrects.
SCORING RULES – PROMPT ONCE IF THE STUDENT
DOES NOT ATTEMPT TO SAY THE WORD #1
•When a student does not attempt to read a word, prompt the student once
to try to read the word.
•If the student attempts to read the word, do not mark a NT and score
as if that is the student’s first response.
•If the student does not attempt to read “quit”, ask the student to
try. If the student reads “quite”, write quite and mark the errors
for quite.
SCORING RULES – PROMPT ONCE IF THE STUDENT
DOES NOT ATTEMPT TO SAY THE WORD #2
•When a student does not attempt to read a word, prompt the
student once to try to read the word.
•If the student still doesn’t read the word, mark NT and score as
a no try.
•If the student does not attempt to read ‘dust’, ask the
student to try. If the student still makes no attempt, mark
NT and core the errors for a No Try.
SCORING RULES – PROMPT ONCE IF THE STUDENT
DOES NOT ATTEMPT TO SAY THE WORD #2
•When a student does not attempt to read a word, prompt the
student once to try to read the word.
•If the student reads the word correctly after the prompt, mark
the work as read correctly.
•If the student does not attempt to read ‘step’, ask the
student to try. If the student reads the word correctly,
place a check next to the word and count it as correct.
SCORING RULES – SENTENCES
(DECODABLE WORDS)
•Put a check (√) above words read correctly.
•If the student misreads the word, put a slash through the word and
write what the student says above the word.
•If the student omits the word, put a slash through the word
•Put an ‘x’ in the No Try box on the Error Grid. (no X goes in the
Sounds Added/Omitted box because that column is for sounds added and/or omitted
within a word.)
•Put ‘x’s in all applicable boxes on the Error Grid. (These boxes have
‘x’s because the student did not read any part of the word.)
SCORING RULES – SENTENCES (SIGHT WORDS)
x
NOTE –Sight Words are in italics on the Recording Form.
•If the student misreads a Sight Word in italics, put a slash through the
word and write what the student says.
•Mark an ‘x’ in the Sight Word box on the Error Grid.
•If the student omits a Sight Word, put a slash through the word.
•Put ‘x’s in both the No Try and the Sight Word boxes on the Error
Grid.
OTHER SCORING RULES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Gray boxes (NA) on the grid are not applicable for scoring.
If a student reads the word correctly, then reads it incorrectly,
put a check (√) by the word, then write what the student says
when he/she misreads.
Mark errors in all words a student reads incorrectly.
One error can cause more than one box on the grid to be marked.
• brag read as rag warrants ‘x’s in 3 boxes: Sounds
Added/Omitted, Initial Consonants, & Blends.
Digraphs do not count as Initial or Final Consonants
• A missed digraph is marked in the digraph column.
When totaling the number correct, each word missed counts as
one error –regardless of the number of times the student
attempted the word.
If students blend a word correctly, count it as one error for Words
Read Correctly, but do not mark errors across the page.
OBSERVATIONS
•Certain characteristics that might be observed as the student reads are
listed in the Observation section in the upper right hand corner of the
Error Grid.
•Check a box if you observe any of the characteristics.
•For b/d or b/p errors, put a check every time you notice the error,
which may indicate the severity of the issue.
YOUR TURN


Practice scoring Beginning Decoding Survey with
presenter.
With a partner, administer and score the
Beginning Decoding Survey.


Remember to make mistakes, so your partner can
score.
Each person should have a chance to be the
scorer.
Donald’s
Beginning
Decoding
Survey
Handout #1
What are Donald’s
strengths &
weaknesses?
WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT DONALD?

Strengths
He reads beginning and ending consonants, blends,
and digraphs well.
 He reads real words quite accurately. (Missed one
vowel: read reach for rich.)


Weaknesses
Short vowels are his most basic difficulty.
 He guesses when he reads even very simple
sentences.
 His lack of ability to read nonsense words tells us he
does not understand basic letter-sound
correspondences, especially with vowels.

LOOKING AT READING DIFFICULTIES
Look at the presenter’s Beginning Decoding
Survey. What is your presenter’s reading
difficulties?
 Look at your partner’s Beginning Decoding
Survey. What is your partner’s reading
difficulties?

APPROPRIATE AGES FOR THE BEGINNING
DECODING SURVEY


Beginning Decoding Surveys are appropriate
from the middle of first grade on.
For all students, ALWAYS start with the
Beginning Decoding Survey.
Short vowels are a problem for many students of all
ages who do not read proficiently.
 The Beginning Decoding Survey will identify almost
all short vowel difficulties.

ADVANCED DECODING SURVEY
Survey
K
1st
2nd
3rd-5th
Beginning
No
Yes in the
middle of
year
Yes
Yes
Advanced
No
No
Yes in the
middle of
the year
Yes
CHANGE IN ADVANCED DECODING
SURVEY COLUMN HEADERS
•“Advanced Vowel” column added to mark when the student misreads an
advanced vowel.
•“Trigraphs” added to Digraphs column.
•Multi-Syllable Words added: Real & Nonsense.
TRIGRAPHS AND 3-SOUND BLENDS
REMINDERS

Trigraphs are three letters that spell one sound.

Two consonant trigraphs on the Surveys:
tch – m a tch
 dge – r i dge


3-sound blends are three consonant letters
together, each with its own sound.

The only 3-sound blend on the Survey:

str – s t r eet
SCORING THE ADVANCED DECODING
SURVEY

Single Syllable Words


Mark just like the beginning decoding Survey.
Multi-Syllable Words
Do not analyze errors.
 Mark an ‘x’ in the box if the student did not read the
word correctly.

Advanced Decoding Survey
30 Harder Words
•8 nonsense words with short vowels
•12 nonsense words with advanced vowels
•4 nonsense words with long vowels
•5 nonsense words with other vowels
•3 nonsense words with r-controlled vowels
•10 multi-syllable words
•5 nonsense multi-syllable words
•5 real multi-syllable words
WHEN TO USE THE ADVANCED DECODING
SURVEY



Administer the Advanced decoding Survey
beginning in the middle of second grade.
Always give every student the Beginning
Decoding Survey before giving the Advanced
Decoding Survey
Looking at scores from both the Beginning and
Advanced Decoding Survey will allow you to
group students with similar needs for decoding
instruction.
Multi-Syllable
Words
No error analysis for
multi-syllable words.
Put an ‘x’ in the box if
the word is read
incorrectly or no attempt
is made to read the
word.
JENNY – HANDOUT #3
PRACTICE SCORING THE ADVANCED DECODING SURVEY

Jenny’s responses are filled in.

You will:
Total the number correct;
 Mark the errors on the Error Grid;
 Total the marks in each column.


Together, we will check your answers.
ADVANCED DECODING SURVEYS
Students with scores lower than benchmark are likely to need intervention
to become strong decoders
USING SCREENING AND
DIAGNOSTIC DATA TO GROUP
STUDENTS
BEN – CAN YOU PLAN INSTRUCTION BASED
ON BEN’S SCORES?

Without having access to Ben’s specific errors,
work with a partner to identify Ben’s decoding
weaknesses and determine what Ben’s
intervention instruction will include.
SLOW READERS DON’T ALWAYS NEED
FLUENCY INSTRUCTION



Slow readers can be accurate or inaccurate.
Slow, inaccurate readers almost always have
difficulty with decoding.
Slow, but accurate, reading may be caused by:
Taking time to figure out the word based on context
because decoding skills are weak.
 Lack of vocabulary, which means the student has to
sound out many words.
 Slow processing.

STUDENTS ASSESSED WITH THE DIAGNOSTIC
DECODING SURVEYS FALL INTO 6 INSTRUCTIONAL
CATEGORIES
1.
2.
Need help improving rate – read and decode
accurately
Need mild decoding help

3.
Need moderate decoding help

4.
groups of 6 maximum
Have severe reading difficulties

6.
groups of 8 maximum
Need significant decoding help

5.
groups of 12 maximum
groups of 1-3 maximum
Scores extremely low, need further diagnostic
testing
HOW TO GROUP STUDENTS AND DETERMINE
INSTRUCTIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS?


Look at similarities in decoding difficulties to
form groups and develop instructional
recommendations
Form groups based on needs of students and staff
resources
FORMING GROUPS: A SCENARIO

Mythical School’s 2nd grade team wants to start
an intervention group. They have 2 classroom
teachers ready to start. Ms. Sally’s class has 8
students who need short vowel decoding work
(based on the DDS). Mr. Jones’ class has 7
students who need help with CVC and sight
words. They decide to spend 25 minutes before
lunch every day “walking to intervention”. Mr.
Jones takes the 15 students who need decoding
help and forms a small group. Ms. Sally takes her
remaining students and Mr. Jones’ students and
works on deeper comprehension and vocabulary
skills using the Reading Street lessons she never
gets to.
FORMING GROUPS: A SCENARIO

Storybook School’s 5th grade team consists of one
classroom teacher, Ms. Blue. Ms. Blue’s class has 5
students who need advanced vowel decoding work
(based on the DDS), 5 students who need work on
multisyllabic words and the rest of her students are
at benchmark. Ms. Blue asks one of her student’s
grandma (who is a retired school bus driver) to come
into class for 20 minutes every day. Grandma Green
has the remaining 18 students read Advanced
Leveled Reader books and discuss them using the
Making Meaning format. During this time Ms. Blue
pulls the 10 students to the back of the room and
works on multisyllabic decoding, with an emphasis on
the vowels in the multisyllabic words.
GROUP PROBLEM SOLVING


Gather with your grade level team from your
building.
Discuss the following:
What human-resources are available at your building to
provide interventions? (Think of all of them: parents,
volunteers, high school older brothers, grandparents,
community members, lunch ladies, office staff with a “free”
20 minutes a day)
 What small bits of time do you have as a team if you
wanted to “walk to intervention”? What small bits of time
do you have if you need to do intervention on your own?
 What are some possible scenarios you can develop for your
team?
 What needs to happen next at _________ in order for you to
implement an RTI model that includes systematic Tier 2
instruction?

INTERVENTION NEXT STEPS
NOW THAT YOU HAVE SOME KNOWLEDGE,
USE IT!
Look at student’s scores and DIBELs booklets
 Use pile protocol
 Administer DDS diagnostic to those who need it
 Determine which areas your students need the
most assistance.

Vocabulary
Makiing Meaning
Strategies
ELI Strategies and
Reading Street
ELI Strategies
Reading Street Vocab Book
Fluency
Making Meaning strategies
Skill Builders
ELI Strategies and
Reading Street
Phonics
6 minute solution
Templates
Phonics for Reading
ELI Strategies and
Reading Street
Syllaboards
Phonemic
Awareness
SIPPS
Road to the Code
Templates
ELI Strategies
Road to the Code
Phonemic Awareness in
young Children
SIPPS Beginning
Template
Reading Intervention Materials Training Matrix
All Staff:
Diagnosing and identifying Reading Problems
Using the Diagnostic Tool/I've Dibeled Now What?
Comprehension
A FINAL THOUGHT…
“You can have the results you say you want, or you
can have the reasons why you can’t have them.
But you can’t have both. Reasons or results. You
get to choose.”
-Susan Scott
Fierce Conversations
EXIT SLIP

Please Reflect on the learning targets for tonight:





I say what RTI means.
I can use the pile protocol to find students that need
extra instruction.
I can administer and score the DDS diagnostic
screener
I know what to do with the DDS diagnostic screener
after I have my student’s scores.
I know what my next steps are for administering an
intervention model in my classroom or building.

similar documents