9 Digits - Suffolk Maths

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Digits Task
Task 1
Task 2
Task 3
Task 4
Task 5
Task 6
Task 7
Task 8
Task 9
Task 10
NC Level 3 to 6
Digits Task 1
Use these cards to make true statements.
Like this one:
Can you find a way to use all the cards in one statement?
Can you find all the possible ways to use the cards?
Home
http://nrich.maths.org/175
Digits Task 2
You have a set of digits from 0 to 9
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Can you arrange these digits
in the ten boxes to the right
to make two-digit numbers
as close to the targets as
possible?
Largest even number
Largest odd number
Smallest odd number
You may use each digit once
only.
Number Closest to 50
Home
9
Largest multiple of 5
http://nrich.maths.org/6343
Digits Task 3
You have 2 sets of digits from 0 to 9
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
Can you arrange these digits
Largest even number
in the boxes to the right to
make four-digit numbers as Largest odd number
close to the targets as
Smallest multiple of 5
possible?
Largest multiple of 3
You may use each digit once Number closest to 5000
only.
Home
http://nrich.maths.org/6342
Digits Task 4
Using a grid of four "boxes“, You must choose four different
digits from 1−9 and put one in each box. For example:
This gives four two-digit numbers:
52 (reading along the 1st row)
19 (2nd row)
51 (left hand column)
29 (right hand column)
In this case their sum is 151 .
5
1
2
9
Your challenge is to find four different digits that give four
two-digit numbers which add to a total of 100.
How many ways can you find of doing it?
Home
http://nrich.maths.org/1130
Digits Task 5
Jane wants to create a six-digit number for her padlock. She
writes down two digits and each digit she writes after these
is the sum of the previous two digits. How many six-digit
numbers could she create in this way? (A number may not
start with the digit zero).
Home
http://nrich.maths.org/6773
Digits Task 6
This represents the
multiplication of a 4-figure
number by 3
The whole calculation uses each of the digits 0−9 once and
once only.
The 4-figure number contains three consecutive numbers,
which are not in order. The third digit is the sum of two of
the consecutive numbers.
The first, third and fifth figures of the five-digit product are
three consecutive numbers, again not in order. The second
and fourth digits are also consecutive numbers.
Can you replace the stars in the calculation with figures?
Home
http://nrich.maths.org/1129
Digits Task 7
Find the sum of all the three-digit numbers which only have
odd digits.
Home
http://nrich.maths.org/738
Digits Task 8
What is the sum of all the three-digit whole numbers?
Home
http://nrich.maths.org/683
Digits Task 9
If you wrote all the possible four digit numbers made by
using each of the digits 2, 4, 5, 7 once, what would they add
up to?
Home
http://nrich.maths.org/853
Digits Task 10
What is the largest possible five-digit number divisible by 12
that you can make from the digits 1, 3, 4, 5 and one more
digit?
Home
http://nrich.maths.org/559

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