here

Report
Making Student Learning
Assessment “Work”:
Aligning Course and Program Learning
Outcomes
Mary Tygh, Assessment Specialist, Professional Education Unit
Juliet Wunsch, Assessment Coordinator, Department of Theatre and Dance
1
Assessment is:

Establishing clear measurable expected outcomes of
student learning.

Ensuring that students have sufficient opportunities to
achieve those outcomes.

Systematically gathering, analyzing and interpreting
evidence to determine how well student learning matches
our expectations.

Using the resulting information to understand and improve
student learning.
Linda Suskie, Assessing Student Learning, 2nd edition
2
Why Do Assessment?
Assessment of student learning is required for all degree
programs, certificates and interdisciplinary minors.
The Assessment process quantifies and substantiates that
students are learning what we think they are learning.
Teaching, Learning and Assessment are integrally linked in the
service of student success.
Improvement and Accountability
3
Resource: Teaching,
Learning, and
Assessment Connection
Website:
http://www.wcupa.edu/TLAC/
4
1.
2.
3.
4.
What do we want students to know/be able to do?
At what points in their education are they being trained to gain the skills?
How do we measure student learning?
Once we have the results, how do we use them to improve student learning?
5
Defining of Program Learning
Outcomes:
Every Program will be different:
Top Down--Assessment Of Student
Learning is regulated by an outside
accrediting agency
Bottom Up--Evolves by reviewing
existing classes and examining the
goals to define your program learning
outcomes.
6
STEP 1: PLAN
Establish Learning Goals
What should students
know and be able to do
when they graduate?

What does a successful
student look like?

Clearly identify your
Program Goals.

7
Defining of Program Learning
Outcomes/Resources:
(from TLAC website)
8
Why Recreate the Wheel?
Connect Course Level Assessment with
Program Level Outcomes
 Identifying where outcomes are already
being taught in your classes

HOW?
1 Method: Curriculum Audit
9

Identifying which Student Learning Outcomes
are taught within each course.

Identify what is being taught and how it can
be or already is being measured.

Direct Measurements/Indirect Measurements
◦ Direct Measures: Provable Facts (Test scores, ratings as
determined via rubrics,…)
◦ Indirect Measures: Proxy Signs that students are probably
learning (Perceptions, Outcomes are assumed to be due to an
event or specific learning,…)
Identifying what’s already there.
10
An Audit of Classroom Objectives and
Measurements already in play…
Class: __________________
Submitted by: _________________________________
Course Objectives: (These should be imbedded in the syllabus, but clearly identify what specific knowledge or skills
should students have after taking this class?)
Teaching Method(s) Used to Assess that these goals are being met:
Department Outcomes Resulting from Taking this Course:
(Courses would RARELY meet all 3, but should be providing foundations for at least 1!!)
____ OUTCOME 1: Knowledge of theatre as a Liberal Art.
____ OUTCOME 2: Research and scholarship.
____ OUTCOME 3: Career Preparation.
11
An informal inquiry into
Information Literacy…
Hi guys, information literacy is a STAND ALONE ASSESSMENT ITEM, which needs to be isolated/separate from our support of general education
assessment goals.
Information literacy is the array of knowledge and skills necessary to identify the information needed for a task and then to locate, understand,
evaluate, and use that information efficiently and effectively within appropriate ethical and legal limits.
These skills relate to a student’s competency in acquiring and processing information in the search for understanding, whether that information
is sought in or through the facilities of a library, through practica, as a result of field experiments, by communications with experts in
professional communities, or by other means.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
determine the nature and extent of needed information;
access information effectively and efficiently;
evaluate critically the sources and content of information;
incorporate selected information in the learner’s knowledge base and value system;
use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose;
understand the economic, legal and social issues surrounding the use of information and information
technology; and
observe laws, regulations, and institutional policies related to the access and use of information.
I IMAGINE that the bulk of our history, design classes and even performance/character development areas of education would contain these
components. Please complete this form for each class which contains an information literacy component. THANK YOU!!
Class: __________________
Submitted by: _________________________________
Teaching Method(s) Used to Assess that these goals are being met:
12
Different Ways to Measure
Program Learning Outcomes
Course
Embedded Assessment
Career point assessment
Pre-test
Mid-point Assessment
Capstone Assessment
Alumni Assessment
13
Coordinating a Matrix to Confirm All
Program Outcomes are being Met.
THA 101 - Introduction to Theatre
1A
1B
1C
X
X
X
X
X
X
THA 102 - Voice
THA 103 - Acting I
X
X
THA 104 - Stagecraf t
X
X
THA 200 - Practicum
X
X
THA 209 - Creative Drama
X
X
X
THA 210 - Stage Make-Up
X
X
X
THA 215 - Costume Construction
X
THA 304 - Scene Design
X
THA 310 - Stage Make-Up II
THA 399 - Student Designers
3A
3B
3C
X
THA 203 - Acting II
THA 306 - History of Theatre I
2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
THA 499 - Stage Management
14
Assessment Cycle

Program Learning Goals
Defined

Assessment Points
Identified (Indicators of
Student Learning)

Results Collected

What now?
What do we do with the assessment results?
“Closing the Loop”
15
Questions
To
Consider:

Are the students learning what you
think they are?

Are they gaining the skills necessary
to succeed?

Might new pedagogies or technologies
lead to improved student learning?

Where and how should resources be
distributed to have the greatest
impact on student learning?

Should we continue the program as is
or should we propose changes?
Closing the Loop = Using your Results!
16
MGP 220
Field Experiences and the Middle-Level Environment
Instructor:
Phone/Email:
Office Hours:
WCU emergency number: 610-436-3311
Catalog Course Description: Orientation to the curricula, processes, and structures of 4-8 classrooms.
Field experiences, minimum 30 hours, related to course topics.
Textbook: Custom Text. (2010). Middle Grades Program Course West Chester University. Boston:
Pearson Learning Solutions.
Course Objectives
EXAMPLE: Course Syllabus for
Middle Grades Preparation
(MGP) 220—Field Experiences
and the Middle-Level
Environment (page 1)
Course Objectives (Student
Learning Outcomes)
(Courtesy of Lynda Baloche, Martha Drobnak,
and Sally Winterton)
Course Objectives are aligned with the WCU Conceptual Framework which can be accessed at
http://www.wcupa.edu/_academics/coed/CollegeofEd/mission.asp
MGP 220 provides teacher candidates with opportunities to:
 observe the complex features of the middle-level classroom environment from the perspective of a
teacher, to examine classroom behavior and management, and to study why experienced teachers
make particular decisions for both the regular education student and the inclusion student during
the instructional day. (WCU Conceptual Framework [WCU CF]: Subject and Pedagogical
Specialist/Diversity Advocate/ Classroom Community Builder; Pennsylvania Department of
Education Standard (PDES) Professional Core Middle School Education; National Middle School
Association (NMSA) Standards 1,2,5,6,7; Journals 1,2; Assignments 1,2,4,5; Blog);
 observe young adolescent behavior of regular education and inclusion students as a basis for
understanding interpretations and instructional applications of pedagogical, developmental, and
management principles. (WCU CF: Assessment and Instructional Designer/School and Community
Professional; PDES Professional Core Adolescent Behavior, Instructional Strategies; NMSA Standards
1,2,5,7; Journal 1; Assignments 2,4,5);
 relate university classwork to the context of the field; gain experiences that will provide a context
for methods courses and future teaching. (WCU CF: Subject and Pedagogical Specialist/Assessment
and Instructional Designer/Diversity Advocate/Classroom Community Builder; PDES: Professional
Core Middle School Education; Lesson Plan; Assignments 1,2,3,4,5; Journals 1,2);
 explore the services and agencies in the larger community that support students’ learning and well
being. (WCU CF: School and Community Professional; NMSA Standards 6,7; Assignments 3,5);
 receive feedback in relation to professional and personal communication skills. (WCU CF: School and
Community Professional; EFEE);
 evaluate the teaching profession as a career choice. (WCU CF: School and Community Professional;
Assignment 1; Journals 3,4; EFFE);
 demonstrate and develop writing proficiency through a variety of writing assignments. MGP 220 is a
Writing Emphasis Course. Careful writing, editing, rewriting, and spoken communication are critcal
to success in this course and success as a teacher. (Journals 1,2,3,4; Assignments 1,2,3,4; Lesson
Plan).
17
PDE 4-8 Professional Core Competencies
I. Middle Level Education
I. A. Philosophy of Middle School Education (WCU CF: Assessment & Instructional Designer; Content and
Pedagogical Specialist; Self-Directed Practitioner; School & Community Professional; Diversity Advocate &
Classroom Community Builder)
Candidates will demonstrate their ability to:
 implement the middle level curriculum ( LP 1.1-1.9);
 hold high, realistic expectations for the learning and behavior of all young adolescents (EFEE 5);
 believe that all young adolescents can learn and accept responsibility to help them do so (EFEE 5);
 assist and support all young adolescents to develop to their full potential (EFEE 5; LP 1.5);
 implement the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs
and schools (LP 1.1-1.9; Assignment 2);
 distinguish the rationale and characteristic components of developmentally responsive middle
level schools (Assignment 2);
 participate fully in the team process as a structure for school improvement and student learning
(EFEE 2,3).
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 2)
PA Dept. of Education (PDE)
4-8 Professional Core
Competencies
I. B. Adolescent Development (WCU CF: Assessment & Instructional Designer; Content and Pedagogical Specialist;
Diversity Advocate & Classroom Community Builder)
Candidates will demonstrate their ability to:
 apply principles of young adolescent development (EFEE 4; LP 1.3, 1.4, 1.6);
 identify the range of individual differences of all young adolescents and the implications of these
differences for teaching and learning (LP 1.5);
 respect and appreciate the range of individual developmental differences of all young adolescents (EFEE
4);
 utilize student assistance and student support programs that attend to the social and emotional needs of
young adolescents (Assignment 3).
I.C. Student Transition (WCU CF:Subject and Pedagogical Specialist; Diversity Advocate & Classroom Community
Builder)
Candidates will demonstrate their ability to:
 design and implement strategies that provide students with appropriate skills in making the transition
from an elementary school environment to the middle school environment and then to the high school
environment (Assignment 4);
 develop supports for students moving to an environment with multiple teachers (Assignment 4);
 recognize and plan for supporting student adjustment to the changing relationships with teachers and the
impact of peer pressure (Assignment 4);
 incorporate knowledge of adolescent development into educating students in goal setting and decision
making (Assignment 4)
I. E. Instructional Strategies (WCU CF: Assessment & Instructional Designer; Content and Pedagogical Specialist)
Candidates will demonstrate their ability to:
 use technology during instruction to teach subject matter (LP 1.9);
 design successful interventions responsive to the needs of individual middle level students (LP 1.5);
 employ teaching/learning strategies that take into consideration and capitalize upon the developmental
characteristics of all young adolescents (LP 1.3-1.9);
 create positive, productive learning environments where developmental differences are respected and
supported and individual potential is encouraged ( EFEE 4,5; LP 1.5; Assignments 2,4);
 create learning opportunities that reflect an understanding of the development of all adolescent learners
(LP 1.1.-1.9);
 motivate students within the context of each subject (LP 1.3, 1.4, 1.6).
18
I. F. Technology and Materials (WCU CF: Assessment & Instructional Designer; Content and Pedagogical Specialist;
Self-Directed Practitioner)
Candidates will demonstrate their ability to:
 use materials designed explicitly for middle level grades (LP 1.8);
 integrate technology in curriculum planning and lesson delivery (LP 1.9);
 use technology during instruction to teach subject matter (LP 1.9).
I. G. Classroom Management (WCU CF: Assessment & Instructional Designer; Diversity Advocate & Classroom
Community Builder).
Candidates will demonstrate their ability to:
 create and maintain supportive learning environments that promote the healthy development of all
young adolescents (EFEE 4, 5; J 1; Assignment 4);
 demonstrate effective adolescent behavior strategies for the classroom (EFEE 4, 5; J 1; Assignment 4);
 use appropriate organizational techniques for the classroom (EFEE4, 5; J 1; Assignment 2,4).
I. H. Professionalism (WCU CF: Assessment & Instructional Designer; Content and Pedagogical Specialist; SelfDirected Practitioner; School & Community Professional; Diversity Advocate & Classroom Community Builder)
Candidates will demonstrate their ability to:
 act as positive role models, coaches, and mentors for all adolescents (EFEE 6, 7; Assignment 1);
 uphold high professional standards.

Interact with various professionals that serve young adolescents (e. g. school counselors, social workers,
home-school coordinators) (EFEE 1, 2, 3, 6)
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 3)
PDE 4-8 Professional Core
Competencies (continued) and
National Middle School
Association (NMSA) Standards
III. Assessment Skills (WCU CF: Assessment & Instructional Designer; Content and Pedagogical Specialist)
Candidates will demonstrate their ability to:
 use assessment data to guide instruction (LP 1.7, 2.1, 2.1);
 monitor the results of interventions and alter instruction accordingly (LP 2.2);
 use multiple assessment strategies that effectively measure student mastery of the curriculum in more
than one way (LP 1.7);
 design assessments that target academic anchors and standards in subject areas (LP 1.7).
National Middle School Association Standards
Standard 1: Young Adolescent Development (WCU CF: Assessment & Instructional Designer; Content and
Pedagogical Specialist; Diversity Advocate & Classroom Community Builder)
Candidates will be able to:
 understand the range of individual differences of all young adolescents and the implications of these
differences for teaching and learning (Assignments 2,3,4; Journal 3)
 know a variety of teaching/learning strategies that take into consideration and capitalize upon the
developmental characteristics of all young adolescents (Journals 1,2; Assignment 2);
 understand the implications of young adolescent development for school organization and components of
successful middle level programs and schools (Assignment 2,4);
 understand the interrelationships among the characteristics and needs of all young adolescents
(Assignment 2,4).
Standard 2 Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization (WCU CF: Assessment & Instructional Designer;
Content and Pedagogical Specialist; Self-Directed Practitioner; School & Community Professional; Diversity
Advocate & Classroom Community Builder)
Candidates will be able to:
 understand the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and
schools (Assignment 2);
 are knowledgeable about historical and contemporary models of schooling for young adolescents and the
advantages and disadvantages of these models (Assignment 2);
19




understand the rationale and characteristic components of developmentally responsive middle level
schools (Assignment 2);
know best practices for the education of young adolescents in a variety of school organizational settings
(Assignment 2,4);
understand the team process as a structure for school improvement and student learning (Assignment 2);
understand that flexible scheduling provides the context for teachers to meet the needs of all young
adolescents (Assignment 2).
Standard 5: Middle Level Instruction and Assessment (WCU CF: Content and Pedagogical Specialist; Diversity
Advocate; Classroom Community Builder)
Candidates will be able to:
 know effective developmentally responsive classroom management techniques. (Assignment 4).
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 4)
NMSA Standards (continued)
Standard 6: Family and Community Involvement (WCU CF: School & Community Professional; Diversity Advocate
& Classroom Community Builder)
Candidates will be able to:
 demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to
working collaboratively with family and community members. They use this knowledge to ensure the
maximum learning of all young adolescents. (Assignment 5);
 understand and value how both diverse family structures and family cultural backgrounds influence and
enrich learning. They work successfully with parents and community members to improve the education
of all young adolescents. (Assignment 5);
 Show knowledge about support services and other resources in schools and communities that support
students and other resources in schools and communities that support students and teachers. They
respect all young adolescents and their families and value the variety of resources available in
communities. (Assignment 5).
Standard 7: Middle Level Professional Roles (WCU CF: Self-Directed Practitioner; School & Community
Professional).
Candidates will be able to:
 display broad understanding of their evolving role as middle level education professionals, the importance
of their influence on all young adolescents, and their responsibility for upholding high professional
standards and modeling appropriate behaviorism (Assignment 1);
 exhibit good understanding of teaming/collaborative theories and processes and the interrelationships
and interdependencies among various professionals that serve young adolescents (e. g. school counselors,
social service workers, home-scoop coordinators), and they frequently work as successful members of
interdisciplinary teams (Assignments, 2,3,4);
 possess knowledge of advisory/advocate theories, skills, and curriculum and employ this knowledge
successfully as advisors, advocates and mentors of young adolescents (Assignment 3);
 maintain an up-to-date understanding of the skills of research data-based decision making and their
service to school reform and the greater community (Assignment 2);
 view themselves as members of the larger learning community, believe that their professional
responsibilities extend beyond the classroom and school (e. g. advisory committees, parent-teacher
organizations), and are committed to helping all young adolescents become thoughtful, ethical,
democratic citizens (Assignment 2,5);
 maintain high standards of ethical behavior and professional competence and value collegiality as part of
their professional practice (Assignment 1);
 hold expectations for their own life-long learning and are committed to refining classroom and school
practices that address the needs of all young adolescents based on research, successful practice, and
experience. (Assignment 1).
20
WCU’S CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR TEACHER EDUCATION
(Revised and Approved by the Council for Professional Education on April 28, 2006.)
Assessment & Instructional Designer
*Constructs effective learning
experiences/outcome assessments, closes the
evaluation loop, and assesses continuously.
Content and Pedagogical Specialist
*Knows learners, subject matter,
pedagogy, and curriculum.
Learning and Teaching
in Context
Diversity Advocate & Classroom
Community Builder
*Values diversity and community in the
classroom through practice.
Self-Directed Practitioner
*Directs personal growth,
professional practice, and reflective
practice.
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 5)
Professional Education Unit’s
Conceptual Framework and
MGP Program Outcomes
Linked to MGP 220
School & Community Professional
*Applies knowledge of the context of
education and engages in collaborative
activities, partnerships, service, and
advocacy.
MGP Program Outcomes Linked to MGP 220
MGP Program Outcome #2: The teacher candidate will demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and use
of the major concepts, principles, theories and research related to development of children and young
adolescents to construct learning opportunities that support the individual’s development, acquisition
of knowledge, and motivation. (WCU Subject and Pedagogical Specialist, INTASC 2; NMSA 1, 2, 3; PDE I;
NCATE 1)
MGP Program Outcome #4: The teacher candidate will demonstrate the ability to plan and implement a
variety of instructional strategies that promote a) critical and creative thinking and problem solving, b)
independent and collaborative inquiry, c) active engagement in learning, and d) self and group
motivation. (WCU Assessment and Instructional Designer; INTASC 4, 5; NMSA 5; PDE I; NCATE 1)
MGP Program Outcome #5: The teacher candidate will demonstrate knowledge and use of a) effective
verbal, nonverbal, and media communications for fostering active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive
interactions in the classroom, and b) educational technologies in instruction, assessment, and other
professional practices. (WCU Diversity Advocate, Classroom Community Builder, Assessment and
Instructional Designer; INTASC 6; NMSA 2, 5, 7; PDE I; NCATE 1)
MGP Program Outcome #7: The teacher candidate will demonstrate knowledge and implementation of
formal and informal assessment strategies, including student self-assessment, for evaluating and
ensuring the continuous intellectual, academic, social, and physical development of children and young
adolescent learners in Grades 4-8. (WCU Assessment and Instructional Designer; INTASC 8; NMSA 3, 4, 5,
7; PDE III; NCATE 1)
21
MGP Program Outcome #8: The teacher candidate will demonstrate the ability to a) identify, evaluate,
and use information effectively and within ethical and legal guidelines, b) reflect on one’s own content
knowledge, teaching skills and effects of each on the growth and learning of children and young
adolescents, and c) seek opportunities to grow professionally. (WCU Self-Directed Practitioner,
Assessment and Instructional Designer; INTASC 9; NMSA 7; PDE I; NCATE 1)
MGP Program Outcome #9: The teacher candidate will demonstrate understanding of collaboration
with school colleagues, families, and agencies in the larger community, to support and advocate for the
learning and well being of children and young adolescents. (WCU School and Community Professional;
INTASC 10; NMSA 1, 2, 6, 7; PDE I; NCATE 1)
WCU General Education Goals Linked to MGP 220
Communicate Effectively
Field based: Teacher candidates write journals based on prompts and classroom observations. Teacher
candidates receive feedback from field teacher— including professional skills and dispositions related to
communication with both professional staff and student— through the utilization of the WCU Early Field
Experiences Evaluation Form (EFEE).
University based: Teacher candidates engage in a collaborative project with an oral presentation.
Think Critically and Analytically
Field based: Teacher candidates write journals based on prompts and classroom observations. Prompts
are designed to focus teacher candidates’ observations, first by directing observations to “see” what is
occurring in the classroom, and second, by posing questions which require the teacher candidate to
state and substantiate opinions.
Field and University based: Assignments #3 and #5 require teacher candidates to research a pupil
support and advocacy issue and investigate school communication artifacts. Teacher candidates then
analyze the literature or materials, draw conclusions and convey the findings through written
summaries and collaborative oral presentations. The Lesson Plan assignment requires teacher
candidates to apply theoretical, observational, pedagogical, and content knowledge to lesson planning,
implementation, and reflection.
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 6)
MGP Program Outcomes
Linked to MGP 220
(continued) and General
Education Goals Linked to
MGP 220
N.B.: Information Literacy is
embedded in the General Education
goals linked to MGP 220 (i.e., think
critically and analytically, and make
informed decisions and ethical
choices).
Make Informed Decisions and Ethical Choices
Field based: Teacher candidates receive feedback from field teacher – including interpretation of and
adherence to school and University policies – through the utilization of the WCU Early Field Experiences
Evaluation Form (EFEE).
University based: Assignment #1 directs teacher candidates to the PA Department of Education
webpage where they read the PA Teacher Code of Ethics. They submit a written summary of how the
Code relates to classroom teachers’ daily issues and practices. Assignment #3 requires teacher
candidates to make informed decisions, following their investigation of a theoretical pupil support and
advocacy issue, through the selection of appropriate school and community services.
22
Policies
Course Requirements
The following are the MGP 220 course requirements:
 obtain and maintain required clearances—TB, FBI, PA Child Abuse, and PA Criminal Background;
 be punctual;
 be professional in appearance and decorum;
 attend university classes ;
 observe in assigned classrooms;
 maintain assigned journal on D2L or as directed by your professor;
 complete assigned readings and participate in class discussions;
 develop and implement at least one lesson plan appropriate to the field experience classroom;
 submit the lesson plan using the WCU Lesson Plan Format on LiveText;
 submit Assignments #1, #2, #3, #4, and # 5 as directed;
 obtain and keep a copy of the EFEE completed by the field teacher;
 ensure that cell phones are silenced and set on vibrate while in the university and field classrooms.
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 7)
Policies
Attendance
Attendance in both the field and university classroom are required.
In the field:
 There are no excused absences.
 If you must be absent, you must contact the field teacher and the university instructor. It is then your
responsibility to “make up” any field hours at a time that is agreeable to you and your field
teacher(s). Your professor must be informed of these arrangements.
 Any student who has not completed all required field hours by the end of the semester will receive a
“NG” (no grade).
In the university classroom:
 One absence from class is excused with prior notice via e-mail or a phone call to the professor.
 Each additional absence from class will result in a loss of five points each from the total points earned
in the semester.
 Three late arrivals and/or early departures will equal one absence.
D2L/LiveText
The course syllabus and documents are on D2L. You are responsible for downloading course documents
for the appropriate class session and field placement. In addition, you are responsible for checking D2L
for any announcements related to this course. It is your responsibility to check your WCU email account
regularly. LiveText will be utilized for the required Lesson Plan. All students must have a LiveText
account.
ADA Policy and Accommodations
In keeping with West Chester University’s commitment to equality of opportunity and compliance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the University has established procedures and designated offices to
provide accommodations for all people with disabilities. A complete copy of the ADA Policy Statement, as well as
appropriate offices, appears in the Undergraduate Catalog. Individuals needing accommodations should make
their needs known to the responsible office at least one week in advance.
23
Assignments/Assessments
Journals
General Guidelines for Journal Entries
You are required to keep a journal to facilitate a) reflection on the profession and b) your field
experiences in MGP 220. You are expected to complete a journal entry each week. On four occasions,
your journal topic will be assigned. Throughout the rest of the semester, you will write on a topic of your
choice.
Things to keep in mind:
 It is not appropriate to evaluate, judge, and/or analyze the teaching strategies and methods of the
field teacher(s).
 In accordance with principles of confidentiality and professional behavior, use pseudonyms in all
written assignments.
 A typical journal entry should not exceed two typed pages.
 Journal entries are not to be written in the field classroom.
 When a journal entry has a specific due date, full credit will not be given for any late submissions.
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 8)
Assignments/Assessments—
Journals and Discussion
Board/Blog
Required Journal Topics
Journal #1 Due _______________
Describe whether the teacher’s approach tends to be student centered or teacher centered. How does
the teacher motivate the students to learn? How are the middle-level students encouraged to succeed?
Describe the system your teacher uses to manage behavior. How is it implemented? What proactive
strategies does your teacher use to help students become self-disciplined learners?
Journal #2 Due _______________
Review the teacher’s manuals for the subjects taught in your classroom. Which do you consider most
helpful for instructional planning? Examine several lessons. What lessons, content, technologies, and
strategies would tend to motivate students toward achievement? Why? What methods and materials
does the teacher use to plan and implement lessons? Which instructional strategies appear to be the
most effective? Why?
Journal #3 Due _______________
Using a pseudonym, describe the student who had the most influence on you this semester. Why do you
think this is so? Describe your teaching and observations of this student. What lessons did this student
help you learn about teaching and learning in today’s classroom?
Journal #4 Due _______________
Review your journal. Choose one entry that you have not previously submitted. Submit this entry plus a
one-page reflection about journaling as a professional development activity.
Discussion Board/Blog
For each school setting during your field experience, post two blogs.
First, describe the school building and your initial reaction/feelings when you entered the building.
Include a description of the classroom and any reactions/comments about it.
Second, describe the school’s community. Consider the physical location of the school building and what
is adjacent to it. Also, describe the greater community of the school in terms of shopping, entertainment
facilities, community services, etc.
24
Assignments #1-#5
Based on instructor feedback, candidates will have opportunities to revise and resubmit Assignments #1
and #2 within one week following the date they are returned. Feedback may include feedback on writing
and feedback on assignment content.
Assignment # 1
Print and read a copy of: Teaching in PA: Pennsylvania’s Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for
Educators http://www.teaching.state.pa.us/teaching
Describe how Teaching in PA: Pennsylvania’s Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators
relates to daily issues and practice for classroom teachers, both in and out of the classroom. Include
implications the code may have for you as a prospective teacher.
This paper should be 3-4 pages in length. Just as the PA Code is a formal document, consider this
assignment as an opportunity for you to demonstrate your skills in formal writing.
Assignment # 2
Each teacher candidate will:
 review the NMSA website www.nmsa.org
 identify and review a minimum of three scholarly journal articles that address middle-level
philosophy, organization, and best practices for educating young adolescents. Topics, all related to
middle-level education, may include: the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive
programs; historical and contemporary models of schools; school organization; flexible scheduling;
team processes related to student learning and school improvement; student transitions, goal
setting, and decision making; and best practices for educating young adolescents.
 explore the field site to learn about transition issues and the strategies and supports designed to
prepare the middle-level students as they transition from the early grades to the middle grades and
then to high school.
This paper should be four to seven pages, include a bibliography and utilize APA style. This assignment is
an opportunity to demonstrate formal writing skills.
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 9)
Assignments/Assessments—
Assignments 1-4
N.B.: There is a rubric for
each of the 5 assignments to
evaluate students’/candidates’
work. The evaluation
scale/level of performance
includes: Target,
Solid/Sound, Acceptable, and
Unacceptable.
Assignment # 3
Each teacher candidate will identify a student advocacy issue present in the field classroom. Assuming
the role of a student advocate, the teacher candidate will explore the pupil support services available to
a teacher through the school, the district, and the community.
The teacher candidate will a) ask the field teacher for information concerning the support services
available within the school, the district, and the community; and b) explore county pupil-support
services as well as the county Intermediate Unit websites to gather additional information.
The teacher candidate will submit a graphic organizer that presents information gathered from all
constituencies. The rationale for these selections will be submitted in a written summary (4-6 pages).
The rationale section of this assignment is an opportunity for you to demonstrate formal writing skills.
Assignment #4
Describe how your field teacher addresses the nature, needs, and interests of early adolescent students.
Note the physical environment, the “climate” for teaching and learning, and the formal and informal
classroom management systems. Examine the district and school’s websites to gather information
about the school’s community related to the cultural, ethnic, linguistic, social, and economic diversity.
Reflecting on class discussions, assigned text readings, and a minimum of three scholarly journal
articles— related to classroom management and organization— respond to the following questions:
25
a. How do the personal attitudes you project concerning students, learning, and teaching affect the
climate and activities in your classroom?
b. What skills for working with middle-level students (e.g. comprehending students’ perspectives on
reality, establishing a basis of respect for all, effective communication, strong curriculum, effective
instruction, providing helpful feedback) are evident in your classroom? What skills would you like to
develop further?
c. How has the classroom been arranged (desks, floor space, storage and supplies) to best meet the
needs and interests of your middle-level students? How is the space used by the students? How is the
space used by the teacher?
d. Identify the school-wide rules and procedures your students are expected to observe. How are they
incorporated into the classroom? What additional rules, procedures, and routines are evident in your
classroom?
e. Describe a lesson or project that took place in your classroom focusing on planning, instruction, and
assessment. How were behavior management and management of the classroom environment
supported by the lesson?
f. What instructional technologies are available to the teacher and the students in the classroom and the
school?
This paper should be four to seven pages, include a bibliography and utilize AP style. This assignment is
an opportunity to demonstrate formal writing skills.
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 10)
Assignments/Assessments—
Assignment 4 (continued) and
Assignment 5
Assignment # 5
Working with your school-based “team,” collect and examine school-to-family communication artifacts,
such as:
 class and school-wide newsletters,
 back-to-school night materials,
 student progress reports,
 parent conference invitations, procedures, etc.
 parenting workshop information,
 class-created books, displays, performances, projects,
 home and school organization communication,
 teachers’ procedures for informal parent conferences,
 other evidence of school-to-family communication.
Reflect on the following:
 How do these artifacts contribute to, and support, the life of the school and community?
 Which artifacts seem to significantly support school/family communication?
 How might the materials meet the needs of the many diverse cultures represented in the school
population— including families of exceptional children?
 What opportunities exist for parents, family members, and community members to become
involved in classroom and school activities?
Work with your school-based team to:
 conduct a collaborative group session(s) to share your findings,
 prepare a visual display to summarize your findings, and
 present an oral summary of your findings and the visual display.
26
Lesson Plan and Reflection
The lesson planning process will provide you with an authentic opportunity to demonstrate your abilities
a) to translate observation and theory into practice and b) in written organization, logic, and clarity.
Lesson planning is an essential competency for all teachers. The Lesson Plan and Reflection is considered
a Writing Emphasis Assignment. You are required to plan and teach a lesson that is appropriate for the
students in your 4th through 8th grade field classroom.
Working in conjunction with your field teacher, you are to select a content area for the lesson you will
teach and use the WCU Lesson Plan Format; this is found on LiveText. The lesson plan must include the
following elements: Learning Outcomes, PA Standards, Anticipatory Set, Procedures, Differentiation,
Closure, Formative/Summative Assessment of Students, Materials/Equipment, Technology, Reflection
on Planning, Reflection on Instruction. Throughout the semester, you will receive instruction related to
the essential elements of the lesson plan.
In the Reflection on Planning section, discuss the aspects of your planning about which you felt
confident and clear. Next discuss the area(s) where you felt uncertain, indicating what you think would
be an appropriate goal for you to focus on in your efforts to improve your planning processes. Comment
on all aspects of your planning. Following the teaching of the lesson, you will write a Reflection on
Instruction. The reflection should include analyses of your teaching, student learning, and suggestions
for further teaching and lesson improvement. Typically, each reflection should be two to three
paragraphs in length.
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 11)
Assignments/Assessments—
Lesson Plan and Reflection
plus Grading
Grading
Grades will be determined as follows:
Written Assignments
Field Journals (4)(W)
Assignment #1: PA Code (W)
Assignment # 2: Philosophy and Organization (W)
Assignment # 3: Pupil Support and Advocacy (W)
Assignment # 4: Classroom Management and Organization (W)
Assignment # 5: School/Family Communication
Blog/Discussion Board
25 points
10 points
40 points
40 points
25 points
20 points
10 points
Lesson Plan (W)
Total
30 points
200 points
“W” indicates Writing Emphasis assignments. 85% of the course grade is derived from “W” assignments.
Grades
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
MGP 220 Points
200-185
184-180
179-174
173-166
165-160
159-154
153-146
145-140
139-134
133-126
125-120
119 and below
WCU Grading Scale Points
100-93
92-90
89-87
86-83
82-80
79-77
76-73
72-70
69-67
66-63
62-60
59
27
Brief Bibliography
Borich, G. (2007). Observation skills for effective teaching. (5th ed.). New York, NY: Prentice Hall.
Brown, D. & Knowles, T. (2007). What every middle school teacher should know. (2nd ed.). Portsmouth,
NH: Heinemann.
Burden, P. (2010). Classroom management: Creating a successful K-12 learning community. (4th ed.).
Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Course Syllabus for
MGP 220 (page 12)
Bibliography
rd
Burden, P. & Byrd, D. (2003). Methods for effective teaching. (3 ed.). Boston, MA: Allen & Bacon.
Charles, C. M. & Charles, M. G. (2004). Classroom management for middle-grades teachers. New York,
NY: Pearson.
Driscoll, A. & Frieberg, H. J. (2005). Universal teaching strategies. (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
Eby, J., Herrell, A., & Jordan, M. (2006). Teaching in K-12 schools: A reflective action approach. (5th
ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.
Emmer, E. T. & Evertson, C. M. (2009). 8th ed.). Classroom management for middle and high school
teachers. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
Fielstein, L. & Phelps, P. (2001). Introduction to teaching. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Guillaume, A. (2004). K-12 Classroom teaching: A primer for new professionals. (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.
Henninger, M. (2004). The teaching experience: An introduction to reflective practice. Upper Saddle
River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.
Kellough, R. (2007). A resource guide for teaching K-12. (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson
Merrill Prentice Hall.
Kronowitz, E.L . (2008). The teacher’s guide to success. Boston, MA: Pearson.
Parkay, F. W. & Stanford, B. H. (2007). Becoming a teacher. Boston, MA: Pearson.
Posner, G. (2005). Field experience: A guide to reflective teaching. (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
Warner, C. (1997). Everybody’s house—the schoolhouse: Best techniques for connecting home, school,
and community. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Wiles, J., & Bondi, J. (2001). The essential middle school. (3rd ed.). Wiliston, VT: Teachers College
Press.
28
MGP
Program Outcomes
1: TCWD the ability to integrate
content, pedagogical, and professional
knowledge and skills to create
learning experiences that make the
central concepts, tools of inquiry, and
structures of the content area
meaningful for all children and young
adolescents in 4-8.
2. TCWD knowledge, understanding,
and use of the major concepts,
principles, theories and research
related to development of children
and young adolescents to construct
learning opportunities that support
the individual’s development,
acquisition of knowledge, and
motivation.
3. TC, in order to meet the needs of all
children and young adolescents
Grades 4-8, including those with
exceptionalities and from diverse
backgrounds, will: a) demonstrate
knowledge of different approaches to
learning; b) demonstrate the ability to
create instructional opportunities
adapted to all learners, and c)
implement instruction that builds on
children’s prior experiences and
diversities.
4. TCWD the ability to plan and
implement a variety of instructional
strategies that promote a) critical and
creative thinking and problem solving,
b) independent and collaborative
inquiry, c) active engagement in
learning, and d) self and group
motivation.
EDP 200
EDP 201
MGP 220
EDR 306
EDR 308
EDR 318
MGP 335
EDP 354
XX
LP, UP,
Exams, JRP
XX
Exams; field
observations
XX
Exams; field;
reflective
journals/
activities
X (foundational) (a)
Exams; report
XX (a)
X(b)
Exams; Field;
Reflective
Journals/
activities
X
J#4
XX
LP, UP,
Exams
XX
LP;
Assign # 4
X J #3
XX
LP, UP, JRP
(b,c)
SCE 330
MAT 351
MAT 352
MGP 410411
XX
Inquiry Activity:
#1,2, 6 and 7
XX
LP;
Fin.Proj.
Final ex
XX
LP;
Field;
Journal;
Final ex
XX
LP:
X
TCS J#5
TIPR 1, 3
XXLesson Plan
XUnit Plans
Inquiry Activity
#2
XX
LP;
Fin.Proj.
Final ex
XX
LP;
Field;
Journal;
Final ex
XX
TCS J#5
TIPR 2
(a,b,c)
ObjectiveAnchor Activity
Field Experience
Analysis
Lesson and Unit
Plans
XX
a, b
LP; journal
XX
a, b, c
LP;
Field;
Journal;
XX
LP
TIPR 12
X
TCS J# 3,5
TIPR 4
XX
LP;
Fin.Proj.
XX
LP;
Journal;
Field
XX
LP, TCS # 5
TIPR 5, 6
XXLesson Unit
Plans Inquiry
Activity
# 4 and 5
MGP Program Outcomes Matrix
Aligned with Courses including MGP 220 in the 4th Column (page 1)
29
MGP
Program Outcomes
5. TCWD The teacher candidate will
demonstrate knowledge and use of
a) effective verbal, nonverbal, and
media communications for
fostering active inquiry,
collaboration, and supportive
interactions in the classroom, and
b) educational technologies in
instruction, assessment, and other
professional practices.
6. TCWD The teacher candidate will
demonstrate planning and
management of instruction based
on a) knowledge of young
adolescent learners, b) content and
curriculum standards, c) the school
and local community, and d) the
philosophical foundations and
organization of middle level
education including the essential
role of the classroom teacher and
children and young adolescents in
curriculum development.
7. TCWD The teacher candidate will
demonstrate knowledge and
implementation of formal and
informal assessment strategies,
including student self-assessment,
for evaluating and ensuring the
continuous intellectual, academic,
social, and physical development of
children and young adolescent
learners in 4-8.
EDP 200
EDP 201
MGP 220
EDR 306
XX
LP; Assign #
4
X
Journal
X
(foundational)
Lesson plan analysis;
exams; reports
X
Exams;
reflective
journals/
activities
EDR 308
EDR 318
MGP 335
EDP 354
X
B
Tech
X (b)
SCE 330
XXField Experience
Analysis
Unit Plans
MAT 352
MGP 410411
X
a
In-class
assign.
X
a
In-class
assign.
XX LP
TIPR 7
X
TIPR 6
X
a, b
LP;
In-class
assign.
X
a, b
LP;
In-class
assign.
XX
LP
TIPR 14
X
TCS # 1,4,5
TIPR 1, 3
X
Journals
LP
X
Journals
LP
XX
LP;
TCS J#6
Mid-term and Final
Examinations
XX
A,b,d
LP, UP,
Exams, JRP
XX (b)
XX(a,b)
Inquiry Activity #1
and 2
Lesson and Unit
Plans
XX
LP
MAT 351
XX
LP, UP,
Exams, JRP
XX
XConsumer Inquiry
Activity
Lesson and Unit
Plans
Final Examination
MGP Program Outcomes Matrix
Aligned with Courses (page 2)
30
MGP
Program Outcomes
8. TCWD the ability to a) identify,
evaluate, and use information
effectively and within ethical and
legal guidelines, b) reflect on one’s
own content knowledge, teaching
skills and effects of each on the
growth and learning of children and
young adolescents, and c) seek
opportunities to grow
professionally.
9. TCWD The teacher candidate will
demonstrate understanding of
collaboration with school
colleagues, families, and agencies in
the larger community, to support
and advocate for the learning and
well being of children and young
adolescents.
EDP 200
EDP 201
MGP 220
X
Reflective
journals/
activities
XX
LP; Assign; 1
X
J#5
EDR 306
EDR 308
EDR 318
MGP 335
EDP 354
XX
A+
b
LP, UP,
Exams, JRP
XX 9(a,b,c)
X
XX
Assign # 2
SCE 330
MAT 351
MAT 352
MGP
410-411
X
b
Journals
X
b
Journals
XX
TCS J#4
X
TCS
J#6
TIPR
XX
TCS J#4
XX
TIPR 17
X TIPR 16
MGP Program Outcomes Matrix
Aligned with Courses (page 3)
31
Moving Towards a
Culture of Assessment
•Keep
on going—assessment is an ongoing process.
•Be flexible.
•Use assessment results.
32

similar documents