Sharon Harrison - Health Education East Midlands

Report
Update on MSC educational provision –
PTP, STP and HSST
National picture
East Midlands LETB HCS Summit
10th October 2013
Dr Sharon Harrison
Modernising Scientific Careers Team
Health Education England, National Programmes
Overview
• Overview of Higher Specialist Scientific
Programme (HSST) , Scientist Training
Programme (STP) and Practitioner Training
Programme (PTP)
• Highlight infrastructures supporting programmes
• Highlight challenges
• Pose questions for the East Midlands to
consider
Healthcare Science Specialisms: 4 Divisions but now “themed”
~50,000 in HCS WF; 62% female; 40% > 45 yr; 19% BME origin; recognised as part of the
wider science sector From Assistants/Associates (CF2-4)
Consultant Clinical Scientists
Life Sciences
• Analytical Toxicology
• Anatomical pathology
• Blood transfusion
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science/transplantation
Clinical biochemistry including
paediatric metabolic
biochemistry
Clinical genetics/Genetic
Science
Clinical embryology &
Reproductive Science
Clinical immunology
Cytopathology including cervical
cytology
Electron microscopy
External quality assurance
Haematology
Haemostasis and thrombosis
Clinical Immunology
Histocompatibility &
immunogenetics
Histopathology
Microbiology
Molecular pathology of
acquired disease
Phlebotomy
Tissue banking
Physiological Sciences
• Audiology
• Autonomic neurovascular function
• Cardiac physiology
• Clinical perfusion science
• Critical care science
• Gastrointestinal physiology
• Neurophysiology
• Ophthalmic and vision science
• Respiratory physiology
• Urodynamic science
• Vascular science
Clinical Bioinformatics including
• Genomics
• Physical Sciences
• Health Informatics
• Pathology
• Physiological Informatics
Physical Sciences and
Biomedical Engineering
• Biomechanical engineering
• Clinical measurement &
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Development
Clinical Pharmaceutical Science
Diagnostic radiology & MR physics
Equipment management & clinical
engineering
Medical electronics &
instrumentation
Medical engineering design
Clinical photography
Nuclear medicine
Radiation protection & monitoring
Radiotherapy physics
Reconstructive Science
Rehabilitation engineering
Renal dialysis technology
Ultrasound & non-ionising radiation
Many of these disciplines require small workforce numbers and
provide highly specialist services. These specialisms are within the
health and social care system in the UK inclusive of the NHS, Public
Health England and the NHS Blood &Transplant service and in the
private & third sector delivering NHS services for patients
Apr 2013
Higher Specialist Scientific Training
• Part of Modernising Scientific Careers model
• Supported by the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (March 2012)
“We intend to support the development of curricula for top-level scientists
working in areas relevant to each college’s field of interest, as part of the
Modernising Scientific Careers (MSC) programme. These curricula will be
developed by both scientists, currently working at an appropriate level in the
relevant field, and medically trained colleagues.......”
Higher Specialist Scientific Training (HSST)
• a 5 year workplace programme underpinned by a doctoral level
award
• trains an expert senior scientist workforce for roles as Consultant
Clinical Scientists in a range of areas to lead, innovate, co-ordinate
care & translational research
• curricula at similar standard to that of higher medical specialty
training (12 & more to come)
• developed through the facilitation of the medical royal colleges and
approved through their systems (AoMRC Statement on website)
• external educational review through IOE
• FRCPath and equivalent outcomes for other specialisms developed
through MRCs and NSHCS
HSST Roles? – What’s the Service Need
Initially identified HSST Specialities
LifeSciences
Physiological Sciences
PhysicalSciences and
BiomedicalEngineering
ClinicalBiochemistry
CardiacPhysiology
DiagnosticImagingSciences
ClinicalImmunology
RespiratoryandSleep
Physiology
RadiotherapyPhysics
MedicalMicrobiology
Neurophysiology
RadiationSafety
Virology
GastrointestinalPhysiology
ClinicalBiomedical
Engineering
HaematologyandBlood
TransfusionScience
AudiologyandHearing
Therapy
UrologyandUrological
Measurement
AnalyticalToxicology
VascularScience
Genetics
Embryologyand
ReproductiveScience
Histopathology(Molecular
Pathology)
Histocompatability and
Immunogenetics
OpthalmicandVisionScience
HSST - Next Steps
•
Final review of front piece by MSC /HEE Team
•
Assessment methodology emerging
•
focus on assessing innovative practice
•
challenge to assess the science & Leadership
•
patient involvement seen as key
•
Doctoral award being designed
•
Funding model being finalised – shared Employer/LETB at ING
•
AESP modules need developing - HSST trainees will use.
•
Workforce plans to reflect new roles – ?some from 2014
•
Scoping being undertaken by LETBs
•
Work to commence with NHS Employers to develop guidance for employers on the
appointment process for consultant clinical scientists
•
20 part funded fellows in Jan 14 and then formally commissioned for 2014/15
Scientist Training
Programme (STP)
Commissioned STP Masters in Clinical Science (2013)
Salford University
Birmingham University
Scientist Training Programme (STP)
Third year of recruitment – 10 MSc Providers in England, 1 in
Wales (Swansea)
Now have STP trainees in England, Wales and Northern Ireland
Four new programmes starting 2013:
• Reconstructive Science – 10 trainees
• Clinical Pharmaceutical Science – including Radiopharmacy with
10 trainees
• Clinical Bioinformatics with specialisms in: Genomics
• Bioinformatics for the Physical Sciences (starting 2014) which
includes mathematical modeling of biological systems
• Critical Care Science
Total STP posts appointed 2013
7773 applications received
721 invited to interview
260 posts filled: 227 via direct entry
33 in-service posts
Division
Appointed
Physical Sciences
93
Life Sciences
87
Physiological Sciences
80
Practitioner Training
Programme (PTP)
BSc Healthcare Science offer distribution following 2013 accreditation (
Life Sciences
Physiological Sciences
)
Physical Sciences & CE
BSc Healthcare
Science
Programme
Cardiac Physiology
Respiratory &
Sleep Physiology
Audiology
Neurophysiology
Ophthalmic &
Vision Science
Blood
Infection
Cellular
Genetics
Radiotherapy
Physics
Radiation Physics
Nuclear Medicine
Medical
Engineering
Radiation
Engineering
Renal Technology
Rehabilitation
Engineering
Number of Accredited BSc Healthcare Science programmes at September
2013
(22 HEI providers)
Number of
Accredited
Programmes 2013
13
10
8
2
0
8
8
8
4
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
Training Healthcare Science Practitioners
• first degree programme (BSc) in one of several themes, exposing the
student to a range of related HCS specialisms and workplace placements but only one group has statutory regulatory
• funded by “shared investment” from student funding (HEI component),
NHS placements and variable additional ad hoc support
• only NHS accredited HEI programmes
• currently issues with some programmes, especially around recruitment
and workplace placements
• Currently over 1000 students on programmes
New HEI participants (Physical Sciences) in the
PTP market
MSC accredited programme at the University of Liverpool, Radiotherapy
Physics Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Physics starting October 2014
MSC accredited programme at Cumbria University, Radiotherapy Physics
Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Physics Programme starting January 2014
MSC approved Graduate Diploma (Cumbria University) route starting in
January 2014 in Radiotherapy Physics and Nuclear Medicine.
• 2 intakes, addressing short term workforce need until undergraduate
programmes delivering
• 2 year programme completing same workplace learning as PTP
• HEI provider for Graduate Diploma commissioned
• Part commissioned/part employer funded
• Local Education and Training Boards (LETBs) have 32 expressions of
interest for January 2014
PRACTITIONER TRAINING PROGRAMME UNDERGRADUATE HEADCOUNT AT 01-12-12
Please enter the name of your University in the space below
BSc Healthcare Science (Blood Sciences)
Please enter
Please enter
University student
University student
number target
number target
Started autumn 2010 Started autumn 2011 Started autumn 2012 Target for autumn 2013 Target for autumn 2014
to complete summer to complete summer to complete summer to complete summer to complete summer
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
10
26
16
37
38
Please enter the student head-count still on-programme at 01/12/12
for all programmes indicated below that you offer
BSc Healthcare Science (Cellular Science)
2
6
18
20
22
BSc Healthcare Science (Infection Science)
4
15
14
19
20
BSc Healthcare Science (Genetic Science)
5
4
4
5
5
BSc Healthcare Science (Audiology)
0
78
82
148
148
BSc Healthcare Science (Neurophysiology)
0
2
1
47
22
BSc Healthcare Science (Ophthalmic & Vision Sciences)
0
0
0
3
3
BSc Healthcare Science (Cardiac Physiology)
45
115
110
188
193
BSc Healthcare Science (Cardiac Physiology) PART TIME ONLY
0
4
0
5
5
BSc Healthcare Science (Respiratory & Sleep Physiology)
12
21
28
49
49
BSc Healthcare Science (Radiotherapy Physics)
0
2
0
5
0
BSc Healthcare Science (Nuclear Medicine)
0
0
0
0
5
BSc Healthcare Science (Radiation Physics)
0
0
0
0
0
BSc Healthcare Science (Medical Engineering)
0
3
6
12
15
BSc Healthcare Science (Rehabilitation Engineering)
0
2
4
8
10
BSc Healthcare Science (Renal Technology)
0
1
2
4
5
BSc Healthcare Science (Radiation Engineering)
0
0
0
0
0
PTP Intake for year
PTP Student population
78
279
285
550
540
78
357
642
1114
1375
Council of HCS in Higher Education
• The CHS was set up formally in October 2012 with funding and support
from the Chief Scientific Officer. Chaired by Professor Wendy Purcell
Plymouth University
• Have agreed a constitution and a 49-member council
• actively champion and promote the unified concept and profile of
academic healthcare science within the HE sector
• enable strategic discussion on academic healthcare science issues,
including career pathways, capacity and capability building and
programme development
• ensure the HE sector is informed about development in healthcare
science education, research and innovation
• Set up PTP and STP Special Interest Group
Healthcare Science nomenclature
Perceptions of Healthcare Science PTP Special
Interest Group and CHS Member Survey
• The chair requested that the PTP group consider
the name ‘healthcare science’ and whether this
is appropriate.
• The survey was designed to understand
perceptions of the term Healthcare Science and
collect further information on the marketing of
the PTP programme.
How do you consider the title ‘Healthcare Science’ to have
impacted recruiting students to PTP programmes in 2012/2013?
Very few people know what careers are
associated with “Healthcare Science"
and it is not obvious that it includes
clinical engineering. However, the
umbrella term does give us a chance to
introduce a variety of specialisms to
potential applicants.
It did (at the beginning) because
Recruitment has been slow due to
nobody knew anything about it.
limited public awareness of ‘Healthcare
However people are becoming
Science'. It seems that many applicants
more familiar with the term. Please
are confusing the nature of the
do not change it now
programme with others
Prospective students tend to be
confused about the pathways they can
take . Especially where there are
multiple choices, they are concerned
that they wont be able to specialise in
their chosen field.
Applicants do not relate to the
title Healthcare Science with
regards to laboratory work. They
consider Healthcare Science to be
a nursing role.
I am not sure that it had a direct impact on
recruitment. The most likely cause of low
recruitment is the professions are not well
known amongst school leavers and careers
advisors.
Very badly. Too complicated. Applicants are
looking for a degree title that they
understand and is consistent with their
passion. When they look at other
Healthcare Science disciplines, audiology
does not seem to fit (as not a lab based
profession).
I do not think that students have an
understanding of what Healthcare
Science means. It is such a broad
subject covering many disciplines
that students avoid it as they do
not know what is involved.
Not as clear as 'Audiology'. An unfortunate
step, given the profession was gaining
momentum. Numbers were down at my
HEI, however reasons (behind this are)
probably due to a number of factors.
Survey Conclusions- for further
discussion
• Overall while there is not strong support for the title
Healthcare Science, there seems to be little consensus
regarding an alternative title.
• It is also acknowledged that there is little understanding of
what a career in Healthcare Science involves and the variety
of professions that it encompasses.
• Some respondents suggested referring to the Healthcare
Science subdivisions within degree titles may help to support
recruitment.
• There may be a need to consider how Healthcare Science as a
concept can be clarified to prospective students.
Next steps for the CHS
Promote the Practitioner
Training Programme and
raise general awareness of
Healthcare science among
the public
Support the involvement of
patients and the public in
the design, implementation
and evaluation of
healthcare science courses
Promote healthcare science
Develop practice placements
guidance.
research including exploring
opportunities as to how
the CHS can support early
career researchers.
PTP promotion and publicity
Classroom Medics have been visiting hospitals around the UK filming
the 45 specialism's of Healthcare Science careers that are often
overlooked by schoolchildren.
http://www.classroommedics.co.uk/
• Commissioned to deliver sessions to schools across country
• Commissioned NHS Careers to develop Ambassador toolkit
(available online)
• Healthcare Science Leaflet, year 13 in 2012/13 as part of Step into
the NHS campaign.
–
for 2013/14 leaflet to include case studies of PTP graduates in employment
• Worked with careers to update website - ongoing
• Visiting HEIs on proportionate touch visits collecting good practice
• HEI Council role – PTP Special Interest Group
Headlines
• First graduates of PTP - Manchester Metropolitan
University CVRS employed (with multiple offers)
• Bradford Genetics students 100% employed, some in
band 7 jobs (predicted 1st and 2:1’s)
• Reports from SW that the PTP (Audiology) students
were more advanced at their level 2 placement than
the BSc students had been for their 3rd year sandwich
placement.
• Students enjoying the courses, particularly the practice
placements
• Overall recruitment picking up (in most areas)
• Reported higher calibre of students
Challenges
Workforce supply
• Arrangements need to be developed to enable better matching of workforce
need with recruitment to programmes across the country both in terms of
potential under and over supply.
Practice Placement Capacity
• Placement capacity continues to be an issue for several academic providers
and the MSC team is encouraging networks of providers from across the
country to come together to support particular programmes, especially
where there is in effect one national provider, for example clinical
engineering.
Placement Tariff
• Capacity issues are compounded by HCS currently being excluded from the
placement tariff
Marketing
• The Council of Healthcare Science in Higher Education (CHS) have
surveyed members to understand perceptions of healthcare science, and
how HCS programmes are marketed by universities. The aim being to
identify and share good practice and look for solutions to develop better
student recruitment and retention strategies.
Next Steps: The Review
Alignment with HEE’s strategic approach
• Education Outcomes Framework (EOF)
Market management
• Workforce planning and demand versus supply
Funding model
• Commissioning arrangements and potential for changing to NHS funded
commissioning model
• Placement tariff
• Student support arrangements
Programme structure
• Use of OLAT
• Curricula review
Questions
PTP
1. Is the current model of “shared investment” correct?
2. Should the PTP (a first degree programme) be funded as
equivalent programmes for nurses & AHPs?
3. Is current funding likely to have on-going impact on recruitment into
some specialisms as appears to currently be the case?
4. How can we better match supply & demand?
5. How can you support the PTP in the East Midlands
Web Links
Council of Healthcare Science
www.councilofhealthcarescience.ac.uk
National School of Healthcare Science
http://www.nshcs.org.uk/
Academy for Healthcare Science
http://www.ahcs.ac.uk/
Details of the MSc Clinical Science Curricula and STP Work Based Learning Guides
http://www.networks.nhs.uk/nhs-networks/msc-framework-curricula/stp
Details of the PTP Programme, including curricula and work based training manuals.
http://www.networks.nhs.uk/nhs-networks/msc-framework-curricula/ptp-1

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