President Casados`s Powerpoint presentation

Report
NMSU GRANTS FALL 2013 CONVOCATION
STATE OF THE COLLEGE
Felicia Casados, President
Friday, September 6, 2013
NMSU Grants CCEDF Capital Outlay Presentation
August 27, 2013
New Mexico Community College
Statewide Service Areas
NMSU Grants
(2)
Encompassing 4
tribal
communities, i.e.
Laguna Pueblo,
Acoma Pueblo,
parts of Navajo
Nation (To’hajiilee
and Thoreau), and
parts of Zuni
Pueblo and four
large public land
bases
(3)
McClure Hall as it looked when I arrived 8 years ago,
1 of 2 existing 1960 Job Corp facilities,
used as campus academic space –
Phase I: (closed for a year) - interior gutting/renovation
A YEAR LATER
Phase II: exterior walls built around it/insulated/exterior was ‘rebuilt’
(4)
McClure Hall today!!
(5)
Fidel Activity Center – our second metal sided
remaining 1960 Job Corp building
(6)
(7)
NMSU-Grants Annual Enrollment & FTE
Year
Enrollment
(Headcount)
FTE
% Change (FTE)
2012-2013
2818
618.47
-13.4%
2011-2012
3193
713.84
-10.3%
2010-2011
3844
795.55
1.2%
2009-2010
3673
785.93
25.6%
2008-2009
3098
625.90
22.8%
2007-2008
2027
509.54
7.5%
2006-2007
1741
473.87
6.0%
**2005-2006
1544
446.84
0.1%
**I arrived 7/2005
(8)
Dual Enrollment Students do not
generate tuition support since tuition is
waived but they do generate Student
Credit Hours/SCH which adds value to
our formula but they are also our
pipeline so worth our investment!
GED Programs at NM community
colleges are the ‘safety net’ for high
school drop outs, young ones as well as
adults. In June 2013 we had 79 GED
graduates; as many as our Associate
degree students!!
(9)
YEAR
Dual Enrollment
Students
GED
Students
2012-2013
247
344
2011-2012
196
342
2010-2011
211
421
2009-2010
215
342
2008-2009
148
271
2007-2008
118
168
2006-2007
78
151
2005-2006
32
126
While Cibola County is not losing population,
growth is very low (less than 1%), therefore
our strategy to grow enrollment has been to
turn back our focus on our service area by
focusing on student populations and their
interest in accessing higher education
opportunities:
YEAR
Dual Enrollment
Students
GED
Students
2012-2013
247
344
2011-2012
196
342
2010-2011
211
421
•
2009-2010
215
342
2008-2009
148
271
2007-2008
118
168
2006-2007
78
151
2005-2006
32
126
Dual Enrollment Students utilizing our
grants to support Summer Dual
Enrollment Academies
•
General Equivalency Diploma (GED)
•
Our students interested in BS/BA Transfer
Program via distance
(10)
NMSU Grants
Associate Degrees & Certificates Awarded
Academic Year
Associate Degree
Certificate
Total Awards
2012-2013
74
30
104
2011-2012
65
42
107
2010-2011
81
57
138
2009-2010
70
81
151
2008-2009
69
76
145
2007-2008
83
85
168
(11)
Most Common Degrees
Degree
Certificate
2012-13
2011-12
2010-11
2009-2010
Associate General Studies
26
16
25
19
Associate of Arts
13
10
12
14
Associate of Science
6
7
5
0
Associate Early Childhood
4
4
2
4
Associate Computer Technician
1
3
4
5
Associate Social Service
9
5
11
4
Associate Pre-Business
1
7
6
3
Associate Criminal Justice
4
3
3
4
All Others
10
10
13
17
Total Associates Awarded:
74
65
81
70
(12)
NMSU Grants
Associate Degrees & Certificates Awarded –
6 year span
(13)
MCCLURE HALL HOUSES NMSU Bachelor of Science (BSN) in Nursing Program delivered @ NMSU Grants
2+2 Program Model NMSU School of Nursing delivers instruction via live ITV with clinicals done locally
NMSU Grants provides the Associate of Science (with Nursing pre-requisites) +
NMSU School of Nursing provides the BSN over 4 Semesters
NMSU Nursing Program accepts 8 new Nursing students each Fall for NMSU Grants Nursing cohort
Students in Grants graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing
Cibola General Hospital contributes $80,000/year to
support NMSU BSN delivery @ NMSU Grants
Supports salary of NMSU Clinical Nursing Faculty
in Grants
Silver Linings has also provided NMSU SON
$30,000 to support BSN Deliver in Grants
(14)
NMSU Grants provides NMSU BSN Program (at no cost):
• Two (2) classrooms, i.e. ITV classroom dedicated to BSN
students & Nursing Skills Lab
• Clinical Nursing faculty office
• ITV studio equipment
• IT Tech support
• Testing Center services
Grants Campus Master Plan 2014 - 2015
NMSU Grants CCEDF Capital Outlay Presentation
August 27, 2013
Grants Campus Short Range Plan
NMSU Grants CCEDF Capital Outlay Presentation
August 27, 2013
Grants Campus Long Range Plan
NMSU Grants CCEDF Capital Outlay Presentation
August 27, 2013
Basic Community College Philosophy:
• Open admission – accept students where
they are at academically.
• Keep tuition low to encourage ‘access’ to a
college education.
• Provide both Career/Technical and
Bachelor degree transfer programs
• Career/Technical programs are expensive to
startup.
(18)
NMSU Tuition Rates by Campus
NMSU Campus
Cost of Tuition by
Credit Hour
(In district students)
Cost of Tuition per
Semester for
Full-time Student
(12+ credit hours)
NMSU Grants
$ 70.25
$ 891
NMSU Carlsbad*
$ 37.00
$ 530
NMSU Alamogordo
$ 76.00
$ 960
Dona Ana
$ 58.00
$ 780
NMSU
$ 259.20
$ 3,110.40
Low tuition because of 3 mil
passage
(19)
Tuition at other New Mexico 2-Year and 4-Year Campuses
School
Credit Hour
Tuition
Tuition/semester for full-time
student (12-18 credit hours)
Two-year Schools
CNM
$ 48.25
$ 579.00
UNM Gallup
$ 71.00
$ 852.00
UNM Valencia (Los Lunas)
$ 65.05
$ 780.60
NM Highlands (Las Vegas)
$ 166.67
$ 2,000.00
Western NM (Silver City)
$ 196.80
$ 2,361.60
NM Tech (Socorro)
$ 238.08
$ 2,857.00
New Mexico State University
$ 259.20
$ 3,110.40
University of New Mexico
$ 285.25
$ 3,223.35
Four-Year Schools
(20)
New Mexico Branch Community College Act
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
NMSU Grants was created in 1968 (45 years of operation) from a request of the
Grants/Cibola School District to NMSU, utilizing a 1960 era Job Corp facility/property.
NMSU Grants was created under the NM Branch Community College Act which required
local voter support of 1 mil for operational support.
NMSU Grants generates between $200,000-$220,000 from our 1 mil of annual property
tax support; the amount fluctuates annually and is only acquired ‘if property taxes are
collected’.
NMSU Carlsbad who is only about 20% larger in student population than NMSU Grants
generates $1,200,000/mil/annually and 5 years ago NMSU Carlsbad voters approved
local election increase from 1 mil to 3 mil in return for lowering tuition rates (that is why
they have lowest NMSU community college tuition rate, a slide I will show you later).
NMSU Carlsbad now generates $3,600,000/annually from their local 3 mil support.
NMSU Grants pays annual overhead fee of $220,000/year to NMSU (and % is going up
annually), so basically our 1 mil covers our annual NMSU overhead fee.
NMSU Carlsbad pays about $400,000 in annual overhead to NMSU, leaving them
$3,200,000 additional annual funding (from their 3 mils) to support their campus capital
needs (and other needs).
(21)
New Mexico Branch Community College Act
•
•
The Regents of NMSU are our ‘Governing Board’ and
The NM Branch Community College act requires that the local school board, in our case,
the Grants/Cibola County School Board acts as NMSU Grants ‘Advisory Board’ with two
(2) major responsibilities:
1. Approve NMSU Grants annual budget; and
2. Approve (or disapprove) ability for NMSU Grants to seek local election
to increase mil or local general obligation bond or both.
• When the Grants/Cibola School Board is ready to approve NMSU Grants to seek a local
election to expand our mil and/or local GO bond, we must pay for the cost of local
election and can not use college funds to pay for such an election (which can cost
upwards of $25,000+).
• To date, Local School Board has been hesitant to allow NMSU Grants to seek expanded
mil support (1-for political reasons/they are voted in and no one likes their property
taxes to go up) and 2-they have not wanted it to negatively impact their own efforts to
pass their own local GO Bond renewals which is how they have been able to
renovate/rebuild their schools along with their K-12 capital funding in past few years.
(22)
Issues
•
•
•
•
•
•
(23)
In our 45 years of operation, NMSU Grants remains at 1 mil of local tax support; we
have not requested increased mil support from our service area since it was created in
1968 and has never utilized its local GO bond capacity.
As many of you know, as large tracks of land (contiguous to tribal lands) are bought by
tribal communities it continues to eventually erode the local property tax base.
NMSU Grants has local bonding capacity of $6,563,000 but we have never utilized it
because local GO bonds must be paid back and we have not had a revenue source to
cover this debt service.
For NMSU Grants to utilize its local GO Bonding capacity it would require added mil
support to pay for a local GO Bond (it is much like a mortgage).
Our Higher education ‘capital outlay’ process is very different than K-12 system. K-12
has a much more defined and planned way in assisting public schools with capital needs
largely due to lawsuits school districts brought to State Public Education Department in
the past.
In this economic era, our current Governor and Higher Education Secretary have said
‘no new facilities for higher education’ at this time!!
Issues
• The primary method NMSU Grants has to receive capital outlay funding is
every other year via the State General Obligation Bond for higher education.
State GO Bond support for our campus has averaged about $1,000,000 every
other year (so say $500,000/year); we have used the State GO Bond funds to
renovate our existing facilities that were in desperate need of renovation when
I arrived 8 years ago.
• Four years ago the State GO Bond was failed by NM Voters (Cibola County did
pass it) for only the second time in its history and it paralyzed our ability to
move forward on much needed renovations to our campus.
• As you all know, public lands and tribal lands do not pay into property tax
system.
• But tribal communities do vote in local property tax elections even though they
do not pay property taxes.
(24)
Issues
•
•
•
•
(25)
The Higher Education Capital Outlay Committee which we present to annually in August (comprised
of 4 State Agency representatives, i.e. Higher Ed Department, Legislative Finance Committee,
Department of Finance and Administration and Energy & Minerals Department) has made it clear to
us that no new higher education facilities (in future after new building moratorium is lifted) will be
considered for NM college campuses without local capital support for those facilities. They are not
requiring a $1 to $1 match but they want a substantial commitment from local community before
they will agree to support any new construction on our campuses.
NMSU Grants has been working towards building a new Child Development Education Center in
order to tie it into a learning lab with our Teacher Education Program; replacing two decaying
portable buildings currently used for the largest state licensed child care center (Small Wonders) in
Grants serving 50 children, infants thru school age, managed by a local nonprofit but housed on
NMSU Grants campus/facilities. NMSU Grants pays for all child care center utilities and cost of
maintenance. A few years ago mold was discovered in the floor of the infant room and it had to be
replaced.
In 2012 we receive $35,000 in legislative support for preliminary planning and design for a new
Child Care Education Center facility. We now have a $5,700,000 price tag to construct this facility,
expanding current 55 child care slots to 80 (based on Small Wonders waiting list).
Child Care facilities/services support student retention and area employment (allowing parents to
work).
•
(26)
Child Development Education Center
Preliminary Estimated Construction Cost: $5,700,000
Expanding child care services from:
• Current 55 children (20/school age/20 toddlers/20 infants)
to
80 children (24/school age, 20/preschool, 16 toddlers/and 20/infants)
and
Tie-In as Learning Lab for campus Teacher Education Program
(27)
Outreach Strategies
Utilizing our federal grants to provide computer technology/GED services to our more rural areas:
Site
Service
Grant funding source:
Pinehill (Ramah Navajo) Oso Vista Ranch Project
13 computers
(8 laptops/5 desktops)
US Depart of Education, Title V - Hispanic
Serving Institution
Thoreau (Navajo)
13 computers
(8 laptops/5 desktops)
US Dept of Education, Native American Serving
Non-Tribal Institutions & Title V
Acoma Pueblo Education
Center
15 computers (7
desktops/8 laptops)
1 FTE GED Instructor
Tutors
US Dept of Education, Native American Serving
Non-Tribal Institutions
To’hajiilee (Navajo)
23 computers (15
desktops /8 laptops)
1 FTE GED Instructor
Tutors
US Dept of Education, Native American Serving
Non-Tribal Institutions
Laguna Pueblo GED
Program
8 laptops
US Depart of Education, Title V - Hispanic
Serving Institutions
Acoma Public Library
8 laptops &
Storage/power cart
US Depart of Education, Title V - Hispanic
Serving Institutions
Laguna Public Library
8 laptops &
Storage/power cart
US Depart of Education, Title V - Hispanic
Serving Institutions
(28)
Pinehill (Ramah Navajo) Community Computer Lab (13 units)
funded by our US Dept of Education NASNTI grant
(29)
2014-2015 Capital Outlay Request(s)
BY
PROJECT
1. Infrastructure upgrades and replacement:
• Martinez Hall Faculty Office Renovations
• Campus Classroom Building Upgrade, i.e. Energy
Controls, Lighting Upgrades, Finishes Upgrades
• Campus Parking, Lighting and Landscaping
3. Construct Child Development Education Center
TOTAL:
w/Child Development Education Center
(30)
TOTAL
$ 1,363,000
$ 230,000
$ 330,000
$ 803,000
$ 5,700,000
$ 1,363,000
+$ 5,700,000
2014 State GO Bond Proposed Projects
Faculty Office Renovations $230,000
(31)
Campus Parking, Lighting and
Landscaping - $803,000
Current Project(s):
Phase III Library Renovations
(we hope it will be the final phase)
(32)
NMSU Grants Library Renovation
(33)
NMSU Grants Library Renovation
(34)
Phase I & II Library Renovations
(completed)
(35)
Moving into Library Renovation Phase III
2012 State GO Bond - $1,000,000
($800,000 available for construction)
(36)
Future Projected Capital Needs
Project(s)
2015-2016
Infrastructure Upgrades and Replacement
$ 2,065,000
Arts & Sciences Center Planning & Design
$
200,000
Martinez Hall Admin Office Renovations
$
800,000
Information Technology Upgrades
$
295,000
2016-2017*
*GO Bond Year
Infrastructure Upgrades and Replacement
$
965,000
Fidel Center Restroom Upgrades
$
230,000
Campus Grounds Master Plan Implementation
$
165,000
Alternative Energy Technologies
$ 1,000,000
Information Technology Infrastructure Upgrades
$
Arts & Sciences Center
$ 6,000,000
TOTAL BY YEAR:
(37)
$ 3,360,000
85,000
$ 8,445,000
Future Projected Capital Needs
Project(s)
2017-2018
Infrastructure Upgrades and Replacement
$ 1,100,000
Alternative Energy Technologies
$ 1,000,000
Information Technology Upgrades
$
2018-2019*
*GO Bond Year
85,000
Infrastructure Upgrades and Replacement
$ 1,100,000
Alternative Energy Technologies
$ 1,000,000
Information Technology Infrastructure Upgrades
$
TOTAL BY YEAR:
(38)
$ 2,185,000
441,000
$ 2,541,000
NMSU GRANTS IS RESOURCEFUL…
by budgeting allowable construction costs into our federal grants
Example: Our Student Success Testing Center
Interior Renovation (Summer 2013)
$55,000 - Funded by: US Department of Education
Native American Non-Tribal Institution 5-Year Grant (Year 2)
(39)
NMSU Grants Engineering Lab Creation:
Funded by our US Dept of Education
Title V Hispanic Serving Institutions Grant ($80,000/renovation)
+ Additional Equipment: $50,000 (ITV/specialized equipment)
&
Santa Fe Community College sharing of their
Carl Perkins Career Technical Grant (for lab computers) ($30,000)
(40)
Our new MAC
computer lab funded
by our US Dept of
Education Title V H.S.I.
grant in 2012
(41)
Rural Students/Staff/Faculty
Deserve Quality Facilities too!!
We have used our capital funding wisely!!
Serving Cibola County for 45 years!!
(42)

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