Food security & Environmental management

Report
One World Centre
educating for a just and sustainable
world
Food waste
7.7 million
households
Global food prices
$1000/year
Cameroon
Bio-diversity
hot spot
Palm oil
Land acquisition
Migration to
the city
Bangladesh
storms and rising
sea levels
Greenhouse
gases
Bali
golf course
fresh water
holiday
International year
of family farming
2014
small landholders
80%
Sweet potatoes
Crop diversity
Papua New
Guinea
Women in farming
Beef
Rice
2,000 litres
15,000 litres
Dr Karl
Kruszelnicki
Fremantle
Mobile phone
Giant squid
Year 9 Geography
The challenges to food production, including land and
water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing
land uses, and climate change, for Australia and other
areas of the world. (ACHGK063)
 exploring environmental challenges to food production
from land degradation (soil erosion, salinity,
desertification), industrial pollution, water scarcity and
climate change
 identifying the impacts on food production from
competing land uses, for example, urban and industrial
uses, mining, production of food crops for biofuels,
production of food crops for livestock, and recreation
(such as, golf courses)
Year 9 Geography
The capacity of the world’s environments to sustainably
feed the projected future population to achieve food
security for Australia and the world.(ACHGK064)
 examining the effects of anticipated future population
growth on global food production and security, and its
implications for agriculture and agricultural innovation
 researching the potential of agricultural production in
northern Australia and identifying how poverty, food
wastage, government policies or trade barriers could
affect future food security
a story from Afghanistan
Rockstrom, Sachs, Ohman & Schmit-Traub (2013) Sustainable Development & Planetary Boundaries.
http://www.post2015hlp.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Rockstroem-Sachs-Oehman-Schmidt-Traub_Sustainable-Development-and-Planetary-Boundaries.pdf
Why is family farming important?
Family farming has an important socio-economic, environmental and
cultural role.
 Family and small-scale farming are inextricably linked to world
food security.
 Family farming preserves traditional food products, while
contributing to a balanced diet and safeguarding the world’s agrobiodiversity and the sustainable use of natural resources.
 Family farming represents an opportunity to boost local
economies, especially when combined with specific policies aimed
at social protection and well-being of communities.
8
Food security & environmental management
Geographic skills and knowledge in this area are
absolutely essential:
 Crucial but less known
 Students - ‘professionals’ and ‘consumers’
 Technical knowledge for innovation and system change
 Knowledge for lifestyle and activism
Some links
 Palm oil case study
 International year of family farming
 Water footprints
 Global Education Website – the power of food
 The Poverty Priority
Year 7: Community & Liveability
Year 8: Change & Urbanisation
Year 9: Trade and Interconnection
Year 10: Well-being
http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/
www.oneworldcentre.org.au
www.facebook.com/oneworldcentre
www.twitter.com/oneworldcentre
Contact us at:
5 King William St
Bayswater 6053
Ph: (08) 9371 9133
www.oneworldcentre.org.au
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Image: The Bridge Progressive Arts Initiative
One World Centre
educating for a just and sustainable
world
Cameroon
Bio-diversity
hot spot
Palm oil
Land acquisition
Migration to
the city
Bangladesh
storms and rising
sea levels
Greenhouse
gases
Bali
golf course
fresh water
holiday
Mobile phone
gorilla
tantalum
Congo river basin
Bibbulmun
Balardong
Whadjuk
South-west
Dr Karl
Kruszelnicki
Fremantle
International Year
of Family Farming
Giant squid
Year 10 Geography
The human-induced environmental changes that
challenge sustainability (ACHGK070).
 discussing the concept of sustainability, and the significance of the
source, sink, service and spiritual functions of the environment
 identifying human-induced environmental changes, for example,
water and atmospheric pollution; loss of biodiversity; degradation
of land, inland and coastal aquatic environments; and discussing
the challenges they pose for sustainability
boodjar, moort, katitjin
Rockstrom, Sachs, Ohman & Schmit-Traub (2013) Sustainable Development & Planetary Boundaries.
http://www.post2015hlp.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Rockstroem-Sachs-Oehman-Schmidt-Traub_Sustainable-Development-and-Planetary-Boundaries.pdf
NATURAL
The conservation of living
things, resources and
support systems
ECONOMIC
Employment and income
that is ongoing and fair
Interlocking pillars of
Sustainability
(UNESCO)
SOCIAL
POLITICAL
Peace, equality and human
rights, especially for the
most vulnerable
Access to decision-making
and influence over your
own life and place
Mediterranean regions: changes in rainfall, 1971 – 2010
Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Enough for all forever
by caring for self,
place and others
http://www.chrisjordan.com/gallery/rtn
Development Compass Rose: TIDE – Global Learning (UK)
http://www.tidec.org
Year 7: Community & Liveability
Year 8: Change & Urbanisation
Year 9: Trade and Interconnection
Year 10: Well-being
http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/
www.oneworldcentre.org.au
CSIRO: Our Future World
• More With Less
• Going, Going, Gone
• The Silk Highway
• Virtually Here
• Great Expectations
www.facebook.com/oneworldcentre
www.twitter.com/oneworldcentre
Contact us at:
5 King William St
Bayswater 6053
Ph: (08) 9371 9133
www.oneworldcentre.org.au
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Image: The Bridge Progressive Arts Initiative

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