PP - West Virginia Office of Education Performance Audits

Report
OEPA
Orientation Training for
West Virginia Schools and
School Systems
Office of Education Performance Audits
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Opening Comments
Session Introduction
Accreditation/Accountability
Dr. Gus Penix
Director, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Materials and Procedures
• Materials
– a copy of today’s agenda
– a copy of Policy 2322
– a copy of today’s Power Point, and
– an Orientation Training Booklet
• Procedures
– Large Group Discussion and Questions
– Agenda Timelines
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
TODAY’S PURPOSE
The purpose of today’s presentation is to
introduce you to:
• the newly adopted Policy 2320,
• the new accreditation process, and
• the School Monitoring Report.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Section 2:
Historical Perspective of
Policy 2320
Dr. Donna Davis
Deputy Director, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Background
 WV Constitution charges the WVBE with the general supervision of
public schools; this policy provides for this.
 The policy is impacted by Resolution of the landmark case of Pauley
vs. Bailey and led to “A Process for Improving Education,” the
blueprint for WV’s standards-based accountability system.
 This blueprint led to adoption of WV Code §18-2E-5 by the WV
Legislature.
 In 2013, SB 359 gave the WVBE authority to redefine sections of
§18-2E-5 that impact school accreditation and accountability.
 The new Policy 2320 (which repeals and replaces the former) is a
result of the Governor’s leadership, direction from the WVBE
Committee on Accountability, and input Stakeholders
West Virginia Board of Education
Standards-Based
Accountability System
OEPA
•
•
Accountability
Accreditation
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Rationale for Aligning
Accountability and
Accreditation
Overview of Policy Sections
Gus Penix
Director, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
NEW ACCREDITATION SYSTEM
• The WVBE approved a new policy for accrediting WV’s
schools and approving school systems, Policy 2320.
• The new policy is the result of changes to WV Code
§18-2E-5 in SB359.
• These Code changes provided opportunity to align
– the accountability system (what’s expected of schools)
with
– the accreditation system (how schools are rated).
• This alignment placed a statewide emphasis on the
improvement of student achievement in ALL schools.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Characteristics of the New Policy
There are six major characteristics of the new policy:
(1) improving student performance,
(2) clearly communicating the level of school quality,
(3) focusing on all schools,
(4) purpose – quality and self-improvement,
(5) emphasizing local control and accountability, and
(6) differentiating supports, consequences, and rewards.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
•
•
•
•
WVBE BELIEFS
All students deserve quality educational programs.
WV’s national rankings have declined.
Those rankings must change.
Every school has a responsibility to improve.
The WVBE is committed to fulfilling its constitutional
responsibilities in providing a quality education for
all students through a system that monitors student
performance outcomes and continuous
improvement in schools.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Old and New Accreditation
• RATIONALE – Eliminate Multiple Rating
Systems:
– Old - Schools received two different ratings.
– New - Schools receive one rating.
• RATIONALE – Create a System that Promotes
Student Performance:
– OLD - Focused school accreditation ratings on selfreported compliance.
– NEW – Focuses on student performance
measures.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Old and New Accreditation
• RATIONALE – Use Language that is Easily
Understood to Communicate School Quality:
– OLD - Language was not easily understood.
– NEW - Language is clearly understood.
• RATIONALE – Focus on Improvement of All
Schools:
– OLD - Only low performing schools received reviews.
– NEW - All schools receive a cyclical review every four
years.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
WVBE EXPECTATIONS
Improve student performance.
Align accountability and accreditation systems.
Incentivize school improvement in all schools.
Hold schools accountable for creating quality school and classroom
conditions.
Create a clear public reporting system.
Create a unified school recognition program to recognize growth
and performance.
Enhance local control.
Address requirements of §18-2E-5 to create a thorough and
efficient system of public education.
“What gets measured gets done.”
“What gets monitored gets done well.”
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Policy 2320 Sections
Section 4 – Glossary
Section 7 – School System Approval
Section 10 – Rewards and Recognitions
Section 11 – Needs analysis, Capacity Building
and Efficiencies.
Section 12 – Communication of Performance
Grades and Approval Levels
Section 13 – Operation of the OEPA
Section 14 – General Appeals Procedures
Section 15 – Severability
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Section 3:
Premises and Purposes
Bill Niday
Consultant, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Section 3: Premises and Purposes
Premises
• All children can learn.
• The primary measure of an effective school is the
quality and equity of student outcomes.
• The level of quality and equity must be public
knowledge.
• The school is the unit of change.
• The capacity for excellence resides in every
school.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Premises and Purposes
Purposes
• Establishing standards and performance
measures
• Holding schools and school systems
accountable
• Implementing a system of public notification
• Evaluating educational progress
• Ensuring equity of opportunity
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Premises and Purposes
Purposes
• Providing a mechanism for continuous
improvement
• Defining a system of supports and
consequences
• Creating a recognition and reward process
• Aiding the Governor, Legislature, and WVBE in
decision-making
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Section 5:
WV Accountability System
Robert Hull
Associate Superintendent, WVDE
West Virginia Board of Education
Policy 2320, A Process for Improving
Education: Performance Based
Accreditation System
• In January 2014, as part of his State-of-the-State Address,
Governor Tomblin asked the WV Board of Education to
establish a simple A-F School Grading System.
• The WVBOE, working with the WVDE and WVOEPA, developed
a system that unites school accountability and school and
district accreditation into a single process.
• Policy 2320 was placed for public comment on April 9, 2014
and approved on May 14, 2014 to become effective July 1,
2014.
• Schools will receive their first A-F grade for the 2014-15 school
year based on the data from the 2014-15 assessment.
21
Policy 2320, A Process for Improving
Education: Performance Based
Accreditation System
• The WVDE will compile the data and assign each school a
grade based upon the criteria set by the WVBOE.
• The OEPA will review the results of the school audits to verify
the grades can be assigned without modification and report
them to the WVBOE.
• The WVBOE will accept and officially release the school
grades.
• High performing schools will be recognized and low
performing schools will receive supports and assistance.
22
Policy 2320, A Process for Improving
Education: Performance Based
Accreditation System
Measuring What We Value in West Virginia
• All students learning
• All students showing significant improvement rather than just
incremental improvement
• All students exhibiting growth at a rate that moves them to
proficiency over time
• All students performing at their highest levels
• Accelerating the growth of those lowest performing students
23
Policy 2320, A Process for Improving
Education: Performance Based
Accreditation System
Grading Components
• Achievement: Includes student proficiency in mathematics
and reading/language arts.
• Student growth: Includes how much students are growing
(observed) and how much students are on track to be
proficient (adequate).
• Performance of Lowest 25%: Includes the accelerated
improvement of the lowest 25% of students in each school.
• Graduation rates for high schools: High schools will be
awarded points based on each school’s four-year and five-year
adjusted cohort graduation rates.
24
Policy 2320, A Process for Improving
Education: Performance Based
Accreditation System
Grade Designations
•
•
•
•
•
A = distinctive student proficiency
B = commendable student proficiency
C = acceptable student proficiency
D = unacceptable student proficiency
F = lowest student proficiency
25
Policy 2320, A Process for Improving
Education: Performance Based
Accreditation System
Elementary/Middle Schools
High Schools
Math Proficiency
Reading Proficiency
Math Observed Growth
Reading Observed Growth
Math Adequate Growth
Reading Adequate Growth
200 points
200 points
100 points
100 points
100 points
100 points
Math Proficiency
Reading Proficiency
Math Observed Growth
Reading Observed Growth
Math Adequate Growth
Reading Adequate Growth
200 points
200 points
100 points
100 points
100 points
100 points
Accelerated Performance of the
Lowest 25% in Math
100 points
Accelerated Performance of the
Lowest 25% in Math
100 points
Accelerated Performance of the
Lowest 25% in Reading
100 points
4-Year Graduation Rate
5-Year Graduation Rate
100 points
100 points
Accelerated Performance of the
Lowest 25% in Reading
100 points
Total Points
1000 points Total Points
1200 points
26
Policy 2320, A Process for Improving
Education: Performance Based
Accreditation System
Letter Grade
Elementary/ Middle
Grade
Description Assignment
School Score on the
High School Score
on the WVAS
WVAS
A
Distinctive proficiency
800-1000
960-1200
B
Commendable proficiency
650-800
780-960
C
Acceptable proficiency
500-650
600-780
D
Unacceptable proficiency
400-500
480-600
F
Lowest proficiency
<400
<480
*Please note these score bands are for illustrative purposes only.
A formal standard setting process will be conducted to establish the initial cut scores.
Cut scores will be reviewed annually and revised as necessary.
27
28
Results: Math
Not Proficient
(53%)
Proficient
(47%)
27% are
Catching Up
64% are
Keeping Up
73% are
Falling Behind
36% are
Falling Behind
29
Results: RLA
Not Proficient
(50%)
Proficient
(50%)
32% are
Catching Up
70% are
Keeping Up
68% are
Falling Behind
30% are
Falling Behind
30
31
Policy 2320, A Process for Improving
Education: Performance Based
Accreditation System
1.
Proficiency Rates
–
–
2.
200 points based on % proficient in Math
200 points based on % proficient in E/LA
Observed Growth
–
–
3.
100 points based on % of students exhibiting at least typical growth in Math
100 points based on % of students exhibiting at least typical growth in E/LA
Adequate Growth
–
–
4.
100 points based on % of students meeting or exceeding growth target in Math
100 points based on % of students meeting or exceeding growth target in E/LA
Lowest 25%: bottom quartile of students in the school
–
–
5.
100 points based on the % of students in the bottom 25% exhibiting high growth in Math
100 points based on the % of students in the bottom 25% exhibiting high growth in E/LA
Graduation Rates for High School
–
–
100 points based on % of students graduating in the 4-year cohort
100 points based on % of students graduating in the 5-year cohort
32
Sample Scenarios
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
33
Elementary Schools
• School 1 – Blooming Rose Elementary School
• Overall high performing school
• Overall high growth school
• School 2 – Trailing Vine Elementary School
•
•
•
•
Moderately performing school
Moderate observed growth
Low adequate growth
Lower performing lowest 25%
• School 3 – Briar Patch Elementary Schools
• Overall low performing school
• Overall low growth school
34
Blooming Rose Elementary School
• Overall high performing school
• Overall high growth school
Component
%
Points Possible
Points Earned
% Proficiency in Math
75%
200
150
% Proficiency in E/LA
72%
200
144
Observed Growth in Math (% typical or higher)
56%
100
56
Observed Growth in E/LA (% typical or higher)
55%
100
55
Adequate Growth in Math (% meeting or exceeding target)
65%
100
65
Adequate Growth in E/LA (% meeting or exceeding target)
67%
100
67
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in Math (% high
growth)
59%
100
59
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in E/LA (% high
growth)
62%
100
62
1000
658
TOTAL
35
Trailing Vine Elementary School
–
–
–
–
Moderately performing school
Moderate observed growth
Low adequate growth
Lower performing bottom 25%
Component
%
Points Possible
Points Earned
% Proficiency in Math
48%
200
96
% Proficiency in E/LA
55%
200
110
Observed Growth in Math (% typical or higher)
45%
100
45
Observed Growth in E/LA (% typical or higher)
49%
100
49
Adequate Growth in Math (% meeting or exceeding target)
40%
100
40
Adequate Growth in E/LA (% meeting or exceeding target)
42%
100
42
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in Math (% high
growth)
41%
100
41
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in E/LA (% high
growth)
48%
100
48
1000
471
TOTAL
36
Briar Patch Elementary School
– Overall low performing school
– Overall low growth school
Component
%
Points Possible
Points Earned
% Proficiency in Math
35%
200
70
% Proficiency in E/LA
37%
200
74
Observed Growth in Math (% typical or higher)
40%
100
40
Observed Growth in E/LA (% typical or higher)
44%
100
44
Adequate Growth in Math (% meeting or exceeding target)
35%
100
35
Adequate Growth in E/LA (% meeting or exceeding target)
37%
100
37
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in Math (% high
growth)
25%
100
25
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in E/LA (% high
growth)
22%
100
22
1000
347
TOTAL
37
Sample Scenarios
MIDDLE SCHOOLS
38
Middle Schools
• Hickory Middle School
• Overall high performing school
• Overall high growth school
• Walnut Middle School
•
•
•
•
Moderately performing school
Moderate observed growth
Low adequate growth
Lower performing bottom 25%
• Oak Middle School
• Overall low performing school
• Overall low growth school
39
Hickory Middle School
• Overall high performing school
• Overall high growth school
Component
%
Points Possible
Points Earned
% Proficiency in Math
70%
200
140
% Proficiency in E/LA
72%
200
144
Observed Growth in Math (% typical or higher)
62%
100
62
Observed Growth in E/LA (% typical or higher)
65%
100
65
Adequate Growth in Math (% meeting or exceeding target)
57%
100
57
Adequate Growth in E/LA (% meeting or exceeding target)
60%
100
60
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in Math (% high
growth)
65%
100
65
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in E/LA (% high
growth)
61%
100
61
1000
654
TOTAL
40
–
–
–
–
Walnut Middle School
Moderately performing school
Moderate observed growth
Moderate adequate growth
Lower performing bottom 25%
Component
%
Points Possible
Points Earned
% Proficiency in Math
55%
200
110
% Proficiency in E/LA
48%
200
96
Observed Growth in Math (% typical or higher)
46%
100
46
Observed Growth in E/LA (% typical or higher)
50%
100
50
Adequate Growth in Math (% meeting or exceeding target)
46%
100
46
Adequate Growth in E/LA (% meeting or exceeding target)
50%
100
50
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in Math (% high
growth)
39%
100
39
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in E/LA (% high
growth)
42%
100
42
1000
479
TOTAL
41
Oak Middle School
– Overall low performing school
– Overall low growth school
Component
%
Points Possible
Points Earned
% Proficiency in Math
36%
200
72
% Proficiency in E/LA
39%
200
78
Observed Growth in Math (% typical or higher)
45%
100
45
Observed Growth in E/LA (% typical or higher)
42%
100
42
Adequate Growth in Math (% meeting or exceeding target)
25%
100
25
Adequate Growth in E/LA (% meeting or exceeding target)
27%
100
27
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in Math (% high
growth)
19%
100
19
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in E/LA (% high
growth)
22%
100
22
1000
330
TOTAL
42
Sample Scenarios
HIGH SCHOOLS
43
High Schools
• Evergreen High School
• Overall high performing school
• Overall high growth school
• High graduation rates
• Hemlock High School
•
•
•
•
•
Moderately performing school
Moderately high observed growth
Low adequate growth
Lower performing bottom 25%
Moderate graduation rates
• Redwood High School
• Overall low performing school
• Overall low growth school
• Low graduation rates
44
Evergreen High School
• Overall high performing school
• Overall high growth school
• High graduation rates
Component
%
Points Possible
Points Earned
% Proficiency in Math
70%
200
140
% Proficiency in E/LA
72%
200
144
Observed Growth in Math (% typical or higher)
62%
100
62
Observed Growth in E/LA (% typical or higher)
65%
100
65
Adequate Growth in Math (% meeting or exceeding target)
57%
100
57
Adequate Growth in E/LA (% meeting or exceeding target)
60%
100
60
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in Math (% high
growth)
65%
100
65
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in E/LA (% high
growth)
61%
100
61
4-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate
88%
100
88
5-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate
92%
100
92
1200
834 45
TOTAL
Hemlock High School
•
•
•
Moderately performing school
Moderately high observed growth
Low adequate growth
Lower performing bottom 25%
Moderate graduation rates
Component
%
Points Possible
Points Earned
% Proficiency in Math
55%
200
110
% Proficiency in E/LA
50%
200
100
Observed Growth in Math (% typical or higher)
62%
100
62
Observed Growth in E/LA (% typical or higher)
65%
100
65
Adequate Growth in Math (% meeting or exceeding target)
36%
100
36
Adequate Growth in E/LA (% meeting or exceeding target)
33%
100
33
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in Math (% high
growth)
30%
100
30
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in E/LA (% high
growth)
30%
100
30
4-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate
79%
100
79
5-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate
83%
100
83
1200
628
TOTAL
46
Redwood High School
• Overall low performing school
• Overall low growth school
• Low graduation rates
Component
%
Points Possible
Points Earned
% Proficiency in Math
35%
200
70
% Proficiency in E/LA
33%
200
66
Observed Growth in Math (% typical or higher)
35%
100
35
Observed Growth in E/LA (% typical or higher)
39%
100
39
Adequate Growth in Math (% meeting or exceeding target)
27%
100
27
Adequate Growth in E/LA (% meeting or exceeding target)
25%
100
25
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in Math (% high
growth)
20%
100
20
Accelerated Growth of Lowest 25% in E/LA (% high
growth)
21%
100
21
4-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate
74%
100
74
5-Year Adjusted Cohort Graduation Rate
79%
100
79
1200
456 47
TOTAL
Points of Clarity
• Requires an amendment to the ESEA Flexibility Request
• Based on initial conversations, USDOE appears amenable to
the concepts presented but negotiations could result in minor
metric changes based on the review of impact data
• Accountability includes all tested grades 3-11
• Cell size is 10
– Only impacts observed growth (average of sub groups) and lowest 25%
calculations; all other calculations are based on the “all” group
– Will report all subgroups for public transparency and for services
delivered via the strategic plan.
48
Points of Clarity
• Priority and Focus status remains a federal requirement but
will not impact school grades
• Priority Schools
– Still at the 5th percentile of Title I schools
– Based on total index rather than just proficiency (should have little
effect because of proficiency being so heavily embedded in the index)
• Focus Schools
– Two definitions in USDOE guidance
• Schools with the greatest achievement gaps (used in current system)
• Lowest performing subgroups (used in amendment)
– Finalized once impact data are available to ensure representation of
appropriate students
• Supports required for both as we currently have in place
• Those currently identified will remain for the initial 3 year
period
49
50
51
OEPA
WV Accountability
System
Questions/Discussion
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
BREAK TIME!
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Section 6:
School Accreditation
Debbie Ashwell
Coordinator, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Accreditation System
• Verifying A-F.
• Assessing and reporting Policy 2322,
adherence to policy and Code, reporting best
practices, efficiencies, and resource, facility,
and capacity building needs.
• Identifying and reporting classroom conditions
and non-compliances that may impact student
learning/well-being, effective/efficient
operation of the school.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Accreditation System
• System of self-study
• Method for promoting continuous improvement
• Basis for determining rewards, supports,
technical assistance, and intervention
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Measures and Levels
• A-F system (Section 5)
• Student outcomes are the primary measures of
school effectiveness.
• School performance rating
– Calculated by the WVDE;
– Verified by the OEPA through accreditation process;
– Approved by the WVBE; and
– Communicated to schools, school systems, and
communities.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Principles and Processes
• Operating Principles
• Review Processes
• Conditions Affecting Grade Verification
• Circumstances for Modifying Grades
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Operating Principles
• Focus on Student Performance – create
school and classroom conditions reflected in
Policy 2322.
• Transparency and Clarity – communicated in
advance and reviewed and validated through
annual and cyclical reviews.
• Vehicle for Local Decision-Making – school
uses available tools to reach consensus on
improvement priorities.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Review Processes
Annual and cyclical reviews are designed to:
1. verify the school’s annual performance grade;
2. provide feedback for local school improvement
efforts;
3. verify compliance with core policy and Code;
4. document best practices; and
5. identify efficiencies, resource, facility, and
capacity building needs.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Annual Reviews
• School Monitoring Report as self-assessment
– School quality defined in Policy 2322
– Compliance with policy and Code
– Best practices
– School resource and capacity building needs
• School Monitoring Report
– Developed with staff input
– Reviewed by Faculty Senate and LSIC
– Approved by principal and superintendent
– Submitted to the OEPA by timeline
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Cyclical Reviews
• On-site review
• At least every 4 years
• Assures all schools are accountable
– common set of high quality standards
– core policy and Code compliance
– continuous improvement
• External Team managed by OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Cyclical Reviews
• Team responsibilities:
– Determine accuracy of School Monitoring Report.
– Review School Strategic Plan.
– Examine school practices (Policy 2322) and
provide feedback on strengths and needs.
– Document best practices.
– Identify resource, facility, efficiency, and capacity
building needs impeding improvement.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Conditions Affecting
Grade Verification
1. Unreliability of performance measures
– Administering student assessments
– Recording dropout and other related graduation
data
2. School conditions that significantly impair
student academic success and well-being
– Pervasive and/or serious in nature
3. Significant policy and Code violations
– Pervasive and/or serious in nature
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Circumstances for
Modifying Grades
Performance grade is a misrepresentation
of overall quality (rare circumstances as
defined on previous slide).
– Unreliable performance measures = grade of F
– Conditions that significantly impair academic
success and well-being = grade of F
– Significant policy and Code violations = reduced
grade, no higher than C
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School Responsibilities
for Accreditation
• Develop knowledge of Policy 2322
• Complete School Monitoring Report
• Develop Strategic Plan
• Implement Strategic Plan
• Participate in On-Site Review Process
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Participate in
On-Site Review Process
• Prepare for review
– Staff orientation
– Documents (School Monitoring Report, etc.)
• Participate in review
– Interviews, observations, review evidence
provided
• Participate in exit conference
– Team summary of visit
• Address review findings contained in report
West Virginia Board of Education
County Board of Education
OEPA
Responsibilities for School Accreditation
• Implementation
– Develop understanding of accreditation processes
– Establish local direction
– Monitor school responsibilities
• Completion of School Monitoring Report
• Review and verify accuracy of School Monitoring
Report.
• School strategic planning process considers annual
feedback.
• Ensure audit review findings are addressed.
West Virginia Board of Education
County Board of Education
OEPA
Responsibilities for School Accreditation
• Establish supports and expectations that impact
student performance
– Principal is instructional leader and all schools are
student-centered and learning-focused
– Structures for school self-assessment and goal
setting leading to improved performance
– School-based PD for unique needs of staff and
students
– Differentiated support based on performance
grade and school need
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
OEPA Responsibilities
for School Accreditation
Tools – prepare for the accreditation process
– School Monitoring Report
– Orientation materials
Information – support documents
– Informational brochures
– Local/regional PD
– Regular electronic updates
– Guidance on processes and procedures
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA Responsibilities
OEPA
for School Accreditation
Feedback – to schools on annual and cyclical
review processes including:
– Strengths and weaknesses related to Policy 2322
– Compliance with policy and Code
– Recognition of best practices
– Assessment of resource, facility, efficiency, and
capacity building needs
– Communication of recommendations and/or findings
– Identification of circumstances that could modify
school’s performance grade
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Section 9:
Continuous Improvement
and Strategic Planning
Charlene Coburn
Coordinator, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School System
Continuous Improvement
• Model quality improvement processes
expected of schools.
– Clear beliefs about teaching and learning that
guide decisions
– Focused mission
– Goals derived from organized process of data
analysis
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Ultimately, the school system’s
improvement process must
determine how school system
leadership, resources, services,
supports, and policies can be
best utilized to improve the
school and classroom learning
conditions that impact student
performance.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School System
Continuous Improvement
Requirements:
–Analysis of accountability data
–Support for schools earning a D or F
performance rating
–Support for schools with accreditation
findings
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School System Strategic Planning
Development Process
1. Analysis of accountability data (WVAS)
2. Strategies to provide targeted support and
technical assistance for schools with a D or F
performance grade
3. Support for schools with findings and directives
from the WVBE resulting from an accreditation
review
4. Strategies for improving overall performance of all
schools
West Virginia Board of Education
Contents of School System
Strategic Plan
OEPA
The contents of the plan are determined by the school
system under the direction of the county superintendent.
At a minimum, the plan includes the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Core beliefs
Mission
Goals
Measurement evidence
Action steps
Professional development
Technical assistance
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Revisions and Approval
• Revisions of the plan are made
– annually as new data and information indicate and
– when directed by the WVBE as outlined in Policy
2320.
• The school system Strategic Plan is approved
through formal action of the county board of
education.
• Submitted to WVDE for review and presented
to the WVBE for approval.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School Continuous Improvement
The improvement process is facilitated by
the principal but involves teachers, staff,
and stakeholders in decision-making and
leadership roles. The principal makes
improvement a focus by developing staff
collective knowledge of needs and by
developing an understanding of and
commitment to the school’s improvement
priorities.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School Continuous Improvement
It is recommended that each school use
information and data provided by the school
system, RESA, the WVDE, and/or other
entities to complete the self-study.
Ultimately, the self-study must assist staff in
determining the root causes of student
performance deficits and help determine
changes needed in school and classroom
practice.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School Continuous Improvement
1. Designated team or committee to orchestrate
the school’s improvement efforts
2. Process of using data and information to
determine needs
3. On-going professional development and
research on how to best improve school and
classroom processes and strategies
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School Continuous Improvement
At a minimum, every school MUST
utilize:
• School Monitoring Report, and
• Summary of employee evaluation
data to guide improvement efforts.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School Strategic Planning
Development Process
– The school electronic strategic
improvement plan is the culmination of :
• School’s self-study of student
performance
• School’s self-study of school and
classroom learning conditions
West Virginia Board of Education
School Strategic Planning
Development Process
OEPA
– The plan is developed under the direction of the
principal with collective involvement and input from
the staff and the LSIC.
– The plan must includes the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Core beliefs
Mission
Goals
Measurement evidence
Action steps
Professional development needs
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School Strategic Planning
Development Process
– The action steps are based on examination of best
practices and innovative approaches to improve student
performance and address student needs.
– All members of the school staff are responsible for
implementing the plan.
– The principal is responsible for monitoring the
implementation of the plan.
– The plan is updated and revised as data and information
dictate based on the tenets of continuous improvement.
– Annual updates to the plan must consider the OEPA School
Monitoring Report when the report identifies deficits in
quality or compliance.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School System Responsibilities
• Ensure each school is led by a principal
knowledgeable of continuous improvement
processes and capable of leading effective
improvement efforts.
• Build capacity by supporting effective
improvement teams.
• Assist schools in creating schedules and
allocating time for staff to work on school
improvement efforts.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School System Responsibilities
• Establish direction and expectations through
school system goal-setting grounded in analysis
of student performance data.
• Review and approve school Strategic Plans.
• Differentiate school system supports and
assistance according to the school needs in order
for each school to meet a C or higher level of
student performance.
• Verify to the WVDE that all school plans have
been submitted, reviewed, and approved by the
county superintendent or designee.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
WVBE Responsibilities
The West Virginia Board of Education
is responsible for creating processes
to support and monitor continuous
improvement through the following
entities:
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
WVDE Responsibilities
• Creating and distributing the electronic
template, as approved by WVBE, through
which the school and school system Strategic
Plan is recorded
• Establishing timelines for the submission of
the school and school system Strategic Plans
• Monitoring school system plan submissions to
assure plans include the core components
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
WVDE Responsibilities
• Providing leadership and technical assistance on
effective continuous improvement and strategic
planning processes
• Providing data, tools, and resources that support
effective continuous improvement and strategic
planning
• Providing input and feedback on the contents of
school system Strategic Plans for those school
systems that have not achieved Full Approval
status
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
OEPA Responsibilities
The Office of Education Performance
Audits is responsible for monitoring and
reporting the submission of school and
school system plan revisions when such
revisions result from WVBE directives
and accreditation findings.
West Virginia Board of Education
WVDE, RESAs, and West Virginia
Center for Professional Development
OEPA
These agencies are responsible for responding
to regional, statewide, school, and school
system professional development needs as
identified in the school and school system
Strategic Plans and from reports compiled as
result of the OEPA accreditation reviews.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Section 8:
School and School System Supports and
Consequences
Allen Brock
Coordinator, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Schools with a D Performance Grade
A school with a D Performance Grade must
receive assistance from the county
superintendent:
• Must find the problem, determine the
improvements necessary, modify the Five-Year
Plan, and evaluate the results.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Schools with Two Consecutive D
Performance Grades
• School must determine if more time with the
existing support will improve the school
• If no improvements, external support must
be sought.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Schools with Three Consecutive D
Performance Grades
A school that receives THREE consecutive D
Performance Grades:
• A summary of actions must be submitted to the WVBE
The WVBE will do one of the following:
• Extend the timeline if improvements are made,
• Declare extraordinary circumstances and intervene
• Take other actions as necessary
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Schools with an F Performance
Grade
• Must receive immediate intervention by the LEA
• LEA must determine if the school/LEA have the
capacity to improve the conditions at the school
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Schools with Two Consecutive F
Performance Grades
• A summary of actions must be submitted to the WVBE
The WVBE will determine one of the following:
• Extend timeline if improvements have been made,
• Declare extraordinary circumstances and intervene,
• Take other appropriate actions.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School Extraordinary Circumstances
Extraordinary Circumstances include, but not limited to:
•
•
•
•
•
physical or other abuse of students;
inappropriate suspensions and/or expulsions;
misappropriation of funds; misuse of public funds;
falsification of reports and/or failure to submit required reports;
violation of W. Va. Code and WVBE policies that impact the provision of an
appropriate educational program;
• unhealthy or unsafe conditions for students and/or employees; or
• failure to provide a high quality and equal educational opportunity for
students which are directly attributed to deficiencies in leadership, school
and classroom learning conditions, and the school’s resources in facilities,
personnel, curriculum, and/or equipment and materials.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
WVBE Intervention
The WVBE may intervene under extraordinary
circumstances and
• Appoint monitors to aid the principal
• Direct the county to target resources to aid
the school
• Remove the principal
• Implement other actions as necessary
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
County System Nonapproval Status
County Nonapproval Status
• Six conditions that may cause a county to receive
Nonapproval Status, as outlined in Section 8.3.b.
Extraordinary Circumstances for County Systems:
• Pervasive and consistent poor performance
• Conditions that threaten the health, safety,
educational quality of students, or fiscal solvency
within the school system
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Conditions of Extraordinary Circumstances for
County Systems
County Extraordinary Circumstances Include, but not limited to:
• misappropriation of funds; misuse of public funds;
• falsification of reports and/or failure to submit required reports;
• violation of W. Va. Code or West Virginia Board of Education policies that
impact the provision of an appropriate educational program;
• unhealthy or unsafe conditions;
• failure to provide a high quality and equal educational opportunity for
students; and/or
• deficiencies in leadership.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Addressing Deficits
When a county board has more than a casual deficit, a
plan must be submitted to the WVDE.
Nonapproval status can be given if the county 1) fails
to gain approval of the plan in a timely manner, or 2)
the county board fails to follow the approved plan.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
WVBE Intervention
When Nonapproval Status is given, a state of
emergency is declared by the WVBE. If
corrections are not made within six months,
the WVBE will intervene.
The authority of the county superintendent and
board may be limited, and the position of
superintendent may be declared vacant.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Immediate County Intervention
Immediate Intervention by the WVBE may
occur if:
• Delay of the intervention is not in the best
interest of students, or
• The county system had been under state
control within 5 years and the conditions
reappear.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
School Accreditation and
Continuous Improvement
and Strategic Planning
Questions/Discussion
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Overview of the School
Monitoring Report
And
Overview of Implementation
Process and Schedule
Gus Penix
Director, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
Implementation Timeline
Policy 2320: A Process for Improving Education: Performance Based Accreditation System
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
Prepare for Implementation of New
Conduct Initial On-site Reviews
Conduct Initial On-site Reviews
System
April
Sept 1
 Policy 2320 placed on
 School Monitoring Report due for Sept 1
 Updates of School
comment by WVBE.
RESA 7.
Monitoring Report
April
Submitted for RESA
 Conduct orientation with
Sept. 15–  Initial on-site review for RESA 7.
4.
superintendents.
Oct.
May
 Policy placed on WVBE
Sept 15
 Updates of School
agenda for adoption. If
Oct. 15
 School Monitoring Report due for
Monitoring Report
adopted, implementation
RESA 6.
due for RESA 1, 2, 3,
schedule begins.
5, 6, 7, and 8.
 All schools in RESAs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
Nov. 15
 Nominations sought for
and 8 submit the School
on-site review team
Sept 14 –  Initial on-site review
Monitoring Report.
members.
Oct.
for RESA 4.
Nov. –
 Initial on-site review for RESA 6.
Oct –
 Initial on-site review
May/June  Key informational
Dec.
Nov.
documents sent to schools
for RESA 1.
and school systems.
Jan–Feb.  Initial on-site review for RESA 2.
Dec. –
 Initial on-site review
 Electronic School
Jan.
for RESA 3.
March
 Initial on-site review for RESA 5.
Monitoring Report
distributed to schools.
Feb –
 Initial on-site review
 Orientation to Initial on-site
Sept –
March
 Orientation to Initial onfor RESA 8.
review process conducted for
April
site review process for
principals, et al, for RESAs 1, 3, 4, April –
 Solicit input on onprincipals, et al, in RESA 6
and 8.
June
site review process
and RESA 7.
and tools and modify
April –
 Solicit input on on-site review
June/Aug.  Training for on-site review June
process as needed.
process and tools and modify
teams.
process as needed.
June –
 Training for
July

Orientation to Initial onsite review process
conducted for principals,
et al, in RESA 2 and RESA
5.
June –
August
*2017-18: Cyclical On-site Reviews Conducted in RESAs 6 and 7
*2018-19: Cyclical On-site Reviews Conducted in RESAs 3 and 4
*2019-20: Cyclical On-site Reviews Conducted in RESAs 1 and 8

Training for additional on-site
review team members.
August
additional on-site
review team
members.
2016-17
Begin Cyclical On-site
Reviews
Sept 15  All schools
submit
annual
update of
the School
Monitoring
Report.
Sept –
March

Cyclical onsite reviews
for RESA 2
and RESA 5.
INITIAL Audits of All Schools
2014
County
Days
County
Days
2015
County
Days
15-Sep
Monongalia
3
Preston
2
5-Jan
22-Sep
Randolph
3
Barbour
2
12-Jan
Cabell
4
29-Sep
Doddridge
1
Harrison
4
19-Jan
Lincoln
2
6-Oct
Gilmer
2
Upshur
2
26-Jan
Logan
3
13-Oct
Lewis
2
Taylor
2
2-Feb
Mingo
3
20-Oct
Tucker
1
Marion
4
9-Feb
Wayne
3
27-Oct
REPORT WRITING
3-Nov
REPORT WRITING
10-Nov
Brooke
2
17-Nov
Marshall
3
24-Nov
THANKSGIVING BREAK
Hancock
2
County
Days
REPORT WRITING
16-Feb
REPORT WRITING
23-Feb
REPORT WRITING
2-Mar
Calhoun
1.5
9-Mar
Jackson
3
Mason
Wirt
3
1.5
16-Mar
Pleasants
2
Roane
2
1-Dec
Ohio
3
23-Mar
Ritchie
2
Tyler
2
8-Dec
Wetzel
3
30-Mar
Wood
4
15-Dec
REPORT WRITING
6-Apr
22-Dec
CHRISTMAS BREAK
13-Apr
REPORT WRITING
29-Dec
CHRISTMAS BREAK
20-Apr
REPORT WRITING
14-Sep
Braxton
2
Fayette
3
4-Jan
21-Sep
Pocahontas
2
Greenbrier
3
11-Jan
Kanawha
5
28-Sep
Webster
2
Nicholas
3
18-Jan
Kanawha
4
Kanawha
4
2015
County
Days
County
Days
2016
EASTER BREAK
County
Days
County
Days
5-Oct
REPORT WRITING
25-Jan
12-Oct
REPORT WRITING
1-Feb
REPORT WRITING
19-Oct
26-Oct
Mercer
McDowell
4
2
8-Feb
15-Feb
REPORT WRITING
REPORT WRITING
2-Nov
Raleigh
5
22-Feb
Berkeley
5
9-Nov
Wyoming
3
29-Feb
Grant
1
Hardy
1
7-Mar
Mineral
3
Pendleton
1
Summers
2
Monroe
1
16-Nov
REPORT WRITING
23-Nov
THANKSGIVING BREAK
14-Mar
Jefferson
4
30-Nov
REPORT WRITING
21-Mar
Morgan
2
28-Mar
EASTER BREAK
7-Dec
Clay
1
14-Dec
Putnam
4
21-Dec
CHRISTMAS BREAK'
28-Dec
CHRISTMAS BREAK'
Boone
3
County
Days
REPORT WRITING
4-Apr
REPORT WRITING
11-Apr
REPORT WRITING
Hampshire
3
OEPA AUDIT SCHEDULES
2014-2020
RESA 1
RESA 2
RESA 3
RESA 4
RESA 5
RESA 6
RESA 7
RESA 8
2014-2015
RESA 2
RESA 5
RESA 6
RESA 7
2015-2016
RESA 1
RESA 3
RESA 4
RESA 8
2014-2015
2015-2016
X
X
2016-2017
2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
RESA 2
RESA 6
RESA 3
RESA 1
RESA 5
RESA 7
RESA 4
RESA 8
2016-2017
2017-2018
2018-2019
2019-2020
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
OEPA
LUNCH TIME!
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Preparing for the Initial
Audit
Resources and Supports
Dr. Michelle Samples
Coordinator, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Completing the
School Monitoring Report
•
•
•
•
Important considerations for principals
Method for completion
Challenges of completion
Areas included on the School Monitoring
Report
• Role of the School Monitoring Report in the
accreditation process
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Preparing for the Initial Audit
• Share the Strategic Plan and the School Monitoring
Report with staff and others.
• Be prepared to discuss how the school is addressing
– Standards for High Quality Schools (Policy 2322),
– school improvement efforts,
– identified improvement needs and strengths, and
– compliance with identified policies and Code.
• Submit required documents promptly to the OEPA as
noted in the Notification Letter.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Preparing for the Initial Audit
• Ensure all other documents are available as
noted in the Notification Letter (Facilities
Checklist).
• Inform staff of the auditing format:
– Classroom observations
– Interviews (staff, students, and parents)
– Lesson plan reviews
• Provide a meeting space for the audit Team.
• Wireless Internet Password (if available).
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Orientation Booklet Section
Frequently Asked
Questions
(Pages 26-28)
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
NEXT STEPS
• Date for electronic submission of the School Monitoring
Report for RESA 5 is November 15, 2014.
• Date for completion of School Facilities Checklist (paper
format) for RESA 5 is November 15, 2014.
• Dates for on-site reviews for RESA 5 are:
Calhoun 3/2/15 (1.5)
Wirt (1.5)
Jackson 3/9/15 (3)
Pleasants 3/16/15 (2)
Roane (2)
Ritchie 3/23/15 (2)
Tyler (2)
Wood 3/30/15 (4)
• Date for first four-year cyclical review for RESA 5 is school
year 2016-17.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
RECAP of Policy 2320 Themes
• All students in WV schools deserve a quality educational program defined
in the WV Constitution as thorough and efficient.
• It is the responsibility of all school systems and individual schools,
regardless of performance level, to have viable structures and processes
for improving the quality and equity of student outcomes.
• The WVBE believes that every WV school has the obligation to improve
and to create school and classroom conditions that lead to student
success.
• As specified in WV Code §18-2E-5, continuous improvement shall be
addressed as part of the accreditation processes.
• The annual and cyclical accreditation processes are designed and
implemented to support local decision-making on how to change school
and classroom conditions in ways that improve student
performance and well-being.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
RECAP of Policy 2320 Themes
• By using the School Monitoring Report, school faculties, and LSICs have a
valuable method for reflecting on current practices, reaching consensus
on improvement priorities, guiding the contents of the school strategic
plan, and addressing non-compliances with policy and Code.
• Each school will self-assess where you are based on the high quality
standards and the OEPA responsibility is, through review processes, to
guide the school to continuous improvement.
• In a word search of the new Policy 2320 the word improvement appears
81% of the time as compared to 19% for compliance. Thus, 80% of the
focus of the new accreditation approach is about school quality as
outlined in Policy 2322 Standards for High Quality Schools and 20% of the
focus is on compliance.
• At the direction of the WVBE, the new accreditation process is framed in
the context of helping West Virginia’s schools continuously improve.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
RECAP of Policy 2320 Themes
Know – Feel – Do
• KNOW – the tenets of the new accreditation
policy.
• FEEL – encouraged that the process is about
improving your school.
• DO – take actions that will prepare your
school for the on-site review process and put
in place practices that focus on continuous
improvement for your school.
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
RECAP of Policy 2320 Themes
The OEPA Website contains all materials used in the
presentation today.
It is suggested you print off copies of the School
Monitoring Report and the School Facilities
Evaluation Checklist form and begin working on
those documents.
http://oepa.state.wv.us/
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Suggested Strategies
for Policy 2320
Implementation
Bill Niday
Consultant, OEPA
West Virginia Board of Education
OEPA
Questions
Session Evaluation
and
Closure
West Virginia Board of Education

similar documents