Revised AACR2 Chapter 9

Report
Implementing the
Revised AACR2 Chapter 9
for Cataloging Electronic Resources
An Online Training Presentation
From the Cataloging Policy Committee (CAPC)
of the Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc. (OLAC)
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
Introduction



Amendments 2001 to the Anglo-American
cataloguing rules includes a complete revision
of the rules for describing electronic
resources.
The basic change is the replacement of the
term “computer file” with the term “electronic
resource” – and all that change implies.
But there is more.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
2
Introduction


This online training presentation was developed under the
sponsorship of the Cataloging Policy Committee of the
Online Audio-visual Catalogers to introduce catalogers to
the new rules for describing electronic resources.
The presentation describes all of the changes in the rules
and discusses




What’s the same
What’s different
and
What this means for cataloging practice
At the end is a section which describes some changes to
the rules that have not yet been published, but which will
eventually have a significant impact on cataloging
electronic resources.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Highlights



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Terminology: “computer files” become
“electronic resources”
1.1C. General material designation:
new GMD [electronic resource]
9.0A. Scope: covers all electronic resources,
“material (data and/or program(s)) encoded
for manipulation by a computerized device”
9.0B. Chief source of information:
“the [entire] resource itself”
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Highlights




9.3: “File Characteristics Area” becomes
“Type and Extent of Resource Area”
9.4B2 states explicitly “Consider all remote
access electronic resources to be published.”
9.5B1: Conventional terminology can now be
used to describe physical carriers: “1 CD-ROM”
instead of “1 computer optical disc”.
9.7B22. Item described: Always give the
date on which a remote access resource was
viewed for description.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
5
Highlights

Coming attractions:


Chapter 12: complete revision; introduces the
concept of integrating resources [2002]
Continuing discussions [2003 or later]



Chapter 9: elimination of the Type and Extent of
Resource Area (9.3)
Chapter 9: possible use of the physical description
area for remote access resources
General material designations (GMD): possible
changes in the nature and/or use of the GMD
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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AACR2 Terminology

What’s Different:


The term “electronic resource” replaces
the term “computer file” wherever it
appeared throughout AACR2.
Chapter 9 is now titled “Electronic
Resources” instead of “Computer Files.”
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Rule 0.24 and Electronic Resources

What's Different:


Bring out all aspects of the item, instead of
concentrating just on the physical form of the
item in hand:
 Content
 Carrier
 Type of publication
 Bibliographic relationships
 Published or unpublished
In any given area of the description, all relevant
aspects should be described.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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1.1C1. General Material Designation

What’s the Same:


Most of the GMDs are the same.
What’s Different:
 The GMD [computer file] has been
changed to [electronic resource].

Note also that the GMD [interactive multimedia],
which had been temporarily accepted within the
Anglo-American cataloging community without
inclusion in AACR2, is no longer valid and has now
been subsumed within the [electronic resource] GMD.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0A. Scope of Chapter 9

What’s Different:

The scope note has been completely
rewritten to describe “electronic resources”



Data (numbers, text, graphics, images, maps,
moving images, music, sounds, etc.)
Programs (instructions that process the data)
Combinations of data and programs
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0A. Scope of Chapter 9
 Electronic resource: Material (data and/or program(s)) encoded
for manipulation by a "computerized device" [See below]. This
material may require the use of a peripheral directly connected to a
computerized device (e.g., CD-ROM drive) or a connection to a
computer network (e.g., the Internet).
 Computerized device: a computer or "computer-like" device used to
manipulate data and/or programs. Examples include (but are not
limited to): mainframe computers, computer terminals/workstations,
desktop computers, laptop computers, handheld computers, tablet
computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), electronic book (e-book)
readers and Internet appliances.
 The term should not be applied to devices containing "computerized
elements." Examples include (but are not limited to): CD music
players, DVD video players, DVD-Audio players, laserdisc video players,
digital cameras and personal digital audio (e.g., MP3) players.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0A. Scope of Chapter 9

Electronic resources exist in one of two modes:

Direct access



Has a physical carrier (disc/disk, cassette, cartridge) that can
be described.
Must be inserted either directly into a computerized device
or an accompanying peripheral.
Remote access


Has no physical carrier.
Access provided by use of an input-output device (e.g., a
terminal) connected to either a computer system (e.g.,
networked resource), or to resources located on a hard disk
or other non-removable storage device.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0A. Remote-Access E-Resources

1. Input-Output (I/O) device connected to resources located on
a non-removable hard disk/storage device:
I/O Device

Storage Device
2. Input-Output (I/O) device connected to a computer system:
Networked Resource
I/O Device
Network
Connection
Networked Resource
Networked Resource
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0B1. Chief Source of Information

What’s the Same:


Most of the specifics, including most of the
examples of sources for formally presented
evidence within an electronic resource.
The instruction that if the information in
these sources varies in degree of fullness we
are to prefer the source that provides the
most complete information.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0B1. Chief Source of Information

What’s Different:


The chief source of information for an
electronic resource is now “the resource
itself” instead of the “title screen.”
Take the information from any formally
presented evidence within the entire resource.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0B1. Chief Source of Information
What’s Different:

The list of examples of “formally presented evidence”
includes two new new types:




home page(s)
encoded metadata such as TEI headers and HTML/XML meta
tags.
The “physical carrier or its labels” is now given as one
equally valid chief source instead of as an secondary
alternative.
The footnote that specified “availability” of information
as including “the cataloger’s access to equipment to
mount or read the file” has been deleted.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0B1. Chief Source of Information

Examples of “formally presented evidence” include:

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title screen
main menus
program statements
initial display of information
home page
the file header including “Subject:” lines,
encoded metadata:

TEI headers

HTML/XML meta tags
the physical carrier or its labels

including information that has been uncompressed, printed out, or otherwise
processed for use.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0B1. Chief Source of Information

What does this mean for cataloging practice?




There is no longer a clear order of precedence for
selection of title.
The rules give direction only if the sources differ
in degree of fullness.
If differing titles are equally full, the cataloger
must rely on individual judgment.
The rule suggests additional terms that might be
used in composing the Source of Title Proper
Note.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0B1. Chief Source of Information

What does this mean for cataloging practice?

The former emphasis on the “title screen” is now gone.
 “Title screen” remains a valid source.



May be especially relevant for cataloging direct-access
electronic resources.
But for cataloging remote-access electronic resources,
catalogers are now free to use sources such as
encoded metadata equally as much as a title
displayed on the screen.
In some cases a different title proper may now be
selected for a particular resource than would have
been selected before this change.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0B1 Footnote 1 defining “Label”

What’s the Same:


The essential meaning of the note is the
same.
What’s Different:

The language is now clearer -- it defines the
label as being added by the creator/
publisher, and as possibly being imprinted on
the item itself. It clearly states that the item
label is different from any labeling on the
container.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.0B1 Footnote 1 defining “Label”

What does this mean for cataloging
practice?


As before, the label may be used as a source
of title but must be specified in a note.
Whether the label is a paper label or
embossed on the disc, it is simply referred to
as “label.”

500
Title from label.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.1. Title and Statement of
Responsibility Area

What’s the Same:


Most of the text of section 9.1.
What’s Different:


The chief source of information for the title
and statement of responsibility has changed,
as covered in the previous section of this
presentation on 9.0B1.
The GMD has changed from [computer file]
to [electronic resource].
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.2. Edition Area

What’s Different:


9.2B1. Sentence added: For frequently
updated remote access electronic
resources, see 9.2B8.
9.2B1. Example added: Interactive version.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.2. Edition Area

What’s different:

9.2B5. New text:

If an item consists of multiple physical carriers,
including accompanying materials, and there
are multiple edition statements relating to the
whole as well as to the parts of the resource,
transcribe only the edition statement(s) relating
to the whole resource in the edition area.
Edition statements relating to parts may be
given in a note.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.2. Edition Area

What’s different:

New rule 9.2B8:
 If a remote access electronic resource is
frequently updated, omit the edition
statement and give the information in a
note (see 9.7B7)
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.3. Type and Extent of Resource
Area

What’s Different:




The names of the area and its sub-sections have
been changed.
9.3. Area 3 for Electronic Resources:
 Old name: “File characteristics area.”
 New name: “Type and extent of resource area.”
9.3B1.
 Old Name: “Designation.”
 New name: “Type of resource”
9.3B2.
 Old name: “Number of records, statements, etc.”
 New name: “Extent of resource”
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.3B1. Type of Resource

What’s the Same:


Three possible terms are prescribed.
What’s Different:

Use the word “electronic” instead of “computer” in
the three prescribed resource types:




electronic data
electronic program(s)
electronic data and program(s)
The qualification to use this area only “when the
information is readily available” has been omitted.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.3B2. Extent of Resource

What’s the Same:


Most of the text of the rule and the examples, except
for the term “electronic” instead of “computer.”
What’s Different:



Omission of the qualification “If a file designation is
given.”
Use of the term “electronic” instead of “computer”.
Two new examples added for Electronic data:



Electronic data (1 file : 2.5 gb)
Electronic data (1 file : 1.2 megabytes)
If the file is compressed the statement is omitted.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.3. Type and Extent of Resource

What does this mean for cataloging practice?



LC Rule Interpretation 9.3B1 instructs LC catalogers not
to use Area 3 for original cataloging of electronic resources
(although LC will accept it on copy).
 Catalogers at other institutions may decide to follow LC’s
local practice and omit the Type and Extent of
Resource Area (256 field) altogether.
For those who choose to use this area of description, use the
term “electronic” instead of “computer” in the designations.
The expanded list of designations adopted by ISBD(ER) have
not been adopted by AACR2, as some thought might happen.

Those terms should not be used in AACR2-compliant records.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.4. Publication, Distribution, Etc.
Area

What’s different:


New rule 9.4B2:
“Consider all remote access electronic
resources to be published.”

This approach to cataloging Internet resources is
now codified in AACR2.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.4. Publication, Distribution, Etc.

What’s different:

9.4D1. Name of publisher, distributor, etc.
Nothing changed.
 New example: [Honolulu?] : M.R. Ogden
(A personal home page).


9.4F1. Date of publication, distribution, etc.


Nothing changed.
New example: [Jamestown, N.D.] : Northern Prairie Science
Center, [1995?]
Note the closing bracket before the hyphen in the date.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.4. Publication, Distribution, Etc.

What’s different:

New rule 9.4F4:


If there is no publication, distribution, etc., date
which applies to the item as a whole, and the item
has multiple copyright dates which apply to
various aspects of the production (e.g.
programming, sound production, graphics,
documentation), transcribe only the latest
copyright date.
Optionally, transcribe the other dates in a note
(see 9.7B7) or in a contents note (see 9.7B18)
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.5. Physical Description Area

What’s the Same:


There is still no physical description for remote access files.
The distinction between Disk and Disc.


Except now stated in the Glossary instead of the Area 5 footnote.
What’s Different:

Option to use the conventional terminology to record the
specific format of the physical carrier (9.5B1).


Examples:
 1 CD-ROM
 2 Photo CDs
 1 DVD
LC will apply this option (LCRI 9.5B1).
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.5. Physical Description Area

What does this mean for cataloging practice?

Catalogers will now have a choice in describing the
carriers of direct access resources.
 For example, instead of using:


You may use:


1 computer optical disc
1 CD-ROM
Note that this option only applies to electronic
resources as defined in rule 9.0A1 (see slide 11).
It may not be used for audio and video formats
covered in Chapters 6 and 7 respectively.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7. Note Area

What’s the Same?


The names and order for most of the rules for notes
are the same.
What’s Different?



The content of several of the rules for the notes
have changed slightly.
Several new examples have been added.
There is one completely new note: 9.7B22: Item
described.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B1. Nature and scope, system
requirements, and mode of access note

What’s Different:


Name of the note has changed (as above).
b) Added to system requirements:


The type of any required or recommended
hardware modifications.
c) Examples added to mode of access:


Mode of access: World Wide Web
Mode of access: Internet via ftp
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B3. Source of title proper note

What’s the Same:


This note is always required in records for
electronic resources.
What’s Different:

One new example has been added:
 Title from Web page (viewed May 29, 1999)

Illustrates a Source of title note combined with an
Item described note.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B3. Source of title proper note

What does this mean for cataloging practice?



Although AACR2 examples are not prescriptive, they
provide guidance on note wording.
“Web page” may not be a helpful example for multipage Web sites.
The OLAC “Source of Title Note for Internet
Resources” document is a useful resource that
provides further guidance on this note:
http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/units/cts/olac/capc/stnir.html.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B3. Remote-access examples

World Wide Web Site:
http://www.sas.upenn.edu/music/ams/
 245 00 $a American Musicological Society
$h [electronic resource].
 500
$a Title from home page.

World Wide Web Site: http://leg.state.mt.us/


245 00 $a Montana legislative branch home page
$h [electronic resource].
500 $a Title from HTML header.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B3. Direct-access examples

CD-ROM:



245 04 $a The ring disc $h [electronic resource] :
$b an interactive guide to Wagner's Ring …
500 $a Title from container.
CD-ROM:


245 00 $a DNA and genes odyssey $h [electronic
resource] / $c Biotechnology Institute.
500 $a Title from title screen.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B4. Variations in title note

What’s the Same:


The text of the rule itself is the same.
What’s Different:

Three new examples have been added that give
helpful guidance on possible wording for 246 $i:


Title in HTML header: American Birding Association home
page
Former title: Butterflies of the United States
(Web resource title changed to: Butterflies of North America)

Second title screen: Personal finances and other
applications
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B7. Edition and history note

What’s Different:

Examples added:




Frequently updated; last update: 2/18/97
Re-published on the Internet, Nov. 1997
Issued in part in print as: Protected areas of the world :
a review of national systems. Gland, Switzerland :
IUCN, c1991-c1992; and as latest ed. Of: United
Nations list of national parks and protected areas.
Originally published in print: Pierre, SD : South Dakota
Dept. of Game, Fish & Parks, Wildlife Division, c1991.
(Report / South Dakota Division of Wildlife ; no. 91-04)
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B8. Type and extent of resource
note

What’s Different:

New name for the note:



Old name: “File characteristics.”
New name: “Type and extent of resource.”
New example added:

File size: 520, 300, 280, 400, 320, 400, 500
records.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B11. Accompanying material note

What’s Different:

Example added:

Set accompanied by one teacher’s and parent’s
guide, titled: Using primary sources / by James
A. Peroco; and one user’s guide. A teacher’s
guide accompanies each disc.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B16. Other formats note

What’s the Same:


The rule itself is the same.
What’s Different:

Two relevant examples have been added:


Database also on CD-ROM; included in : Arctic and
Antarctic regions (National Information Services Corp.)
Database and other associated documentation
available in a Mac version and in four PC-compatible
formats: table-delimited ASCII file; SPSS portable file;
Excel file; SAS formatted file
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B20. Local note

What’s Different:

Two new examples added:



Resource copied Apr. 1999 from local area
network
Restricted to users at subscribing institutions
One example deleted:

File closed until Jan. 1990
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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9.7B22. Item described note

What’s Different:



This is a completely new note in Chapter 9.
Prescribes that the date on which the resource was
viewed for cataloging always be given in records for
remote-access resources.
Example given:


Description based on contents viewed Sept. 16, 1998.
In practice this note is usually combined with the
Source of title note and included in parentheses after
that information: see first slide for 9.7B3.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Glossary: Added & Deleted Terms

Electronic Resource: new term; for changes to the definition,
see the discussion of rule 9.0A. Scope.

Disk (Electronic resources): previously defined in a footnote in
Chapter Nine.

File (Electronic resources): describes “a basic unit which
electronic resources are organized and stored. Electronic resources
can contain one or more files.” This is the only valid use of the
term “file” that remains in AACR.

Optical disc (Electronic resources): “disc” previously
described in a footnote in Chapter Nine.

Deleted terms: File name (Computer files); Multipart file
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Glossary: Changed Terms

Computer file: is now a reference to “Electronic Resource”.

Container: the definition has been edited for clarity, to distinguish
the container from the physical carrier.

Direct access (Electronic resources): qualifier updated.

Edition: Electronic resources: qualifier updated.

Remote access (Electronic resources): qualifier updated.

Sleeve: definition expanded; a “protective envelope” for any
bibliographic material, not just for a sound disc.

Title Screen (Electronic resource): qualifier updated.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Previews of Coming Attractions!
Revision of AACR2 continues, and some
upcoming changes relate to electronic
resources.
Warning: The following revisions have
not yet been published. They are not to
be implemented until they have been
formally published as part of AACR2.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Previews of Coming Attractions!
Chapter 12 is being revised; among other
things, this revision introduces the concept of
integrating resources.
 Area 3 in Chapter 9 will most likely be
eliminated.
 Discussions continue on the use of Area 5 for
remote electronic resources.
 Discussions continue on the future of the
general material designation (GMD).

Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Chapter 12

When?


2002 revision of AACR [next summer]
What will change?

New concepts:


Continuing resources
Integrating resources
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Chapter 12
Many electronic resources are neither
monographs nor serials. Unlike monographs,
they can change over time; unlike serials, they
do not consist of successively-issued parts.
 There is no appropriate category in AACR2
that captures the dynamic nature of these
resources.
 The revision to Chapter 12 introduces a new
conceptual model of the bibliographic universe.

Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Chapter 12
Conceptual Model of the Bibliographic Universe
Finite Resources
Single Part
† books
† electronic texts
Multi Part
† complete
† incomplete
Continuing Resources
Successive
† serials
† series
Integrating
† updating looseleafs
† updating databases
† updating Web sites
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Chapter 12

Integrating Resources:



They are intended to be updated, but in a very
different way from successively-issued resources.
The updates do not remain distinct, but are
integrated into the content of the resource.
This concept is applicable to dynamic
electronic resources, such as databases and
Web sites.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Chapter 12

Basic cataloging practices for
integrating resources:



Base the description on the latest iteration.
When the resource changes in a significant
way, revise the description to match the
latest iteration.
Make notes on significant features of
earlier iterations
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Chapter 12

In the meantime . . .



Until the revisions are published, dynamic
electronic resources need to be described using
the current rules. However . . .
Dynamic electronic resources share many of the
distinctive features of looseleaf publications.
Many of the basic cataloging practices described
on the previous slide are also found in:
Cataloging rules for the description of looseleaf publications : with
special emphasis on legal materials / by Adele Hallam. – 2nd
ed. – Washington, D.C. : Office for Descriptive Cataloging,
Library of Congress, 1989. Included in Cataloger’s Desktop.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Chapter 12

In the meantime . . . (continued)


You may choose to apply practices for looseleaf
publications to dynamic electronic resources.
Note on MARC 21 coding:



The new bibliographic level code “i” for integrating
resources has been approved, but not implemented.
The use of the serials 008 field for integrating resources
has been approved, but not implemented.
Until the changes have been implemented, code dynamic
electronic resources as bibliographic level “m” and use
the appropriate 008 field.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
58
Chapter 9: Area 3




The usefulness of the “file description area”
has been questioned.
There seems to be agreement that
Area 3 should be eliminated from the rules.
The remaining question is where information
about the type and extent of the resource
should be recorded in the description.
A revision will probably be included in the
2003 Amendments to AACR2.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
59
Chapter 9: Area 3

Where should type and extent of the resource
be recorded? Two views:



View 1: The type of resource and its extent is seldom vital
information. It should be recorded (if it is significant) in notes.
The type of resource can be considered a note on the nature and
scope of the resource; the extent (e.g., file size) can be recorded in
a note on extent.
View 2: For certain types of material – those that are defined as a
type of content (e.g., cartographic material) – the nature and
extent of the content is just as important as the nature and extent
of the physical carrier, and both should be recorded in Area 5.
It is not clear at this point how this issue will
be resolved.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Chapter 9: Remote Resources in Area 5

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A footnote to rule 9.5 currently states that a physical description is not
given for remote-access resources – presumably on the grounds that
there is no physical carrier to describe.
This rule has also been questioned.
The “physical description” has never been restricted to physical
characteristics: for example, sound and colour apply to the content of
the resource, and duration is a measure of the extent of the content.
The current situation leads to inconsistency in whether the same
information (e.g., sound, colour, accompanying material) is recorded in
field 300 or in a note.
But how can you describe something that is not physical? What is the
specific material designation (SMD) for a networked electronic resource?
The issue is unresolved, and discussions continue.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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General Material Designations



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Discussions also continue on the future of the general material
designation (GMD).
The current GMDs are not consistently defined according to any
logical taxonomy.
It is more and more common for more than one GMD to be
applicable to a given resource.
It is more and more common for the same content to be issued
in different formats; in this case, what is needed is the ability to
distinguish these versions, and the GMD is not always
sufficiently specific to do this.
These issues will need to be resolved if the GMD is to continue
to serve its purpose as a clear and succinct identification of the
type of bibliographic material being described.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Previews of Coming Attractions

How to follow the discussion:


Joint Steering Committee for Revision of AACR
http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/jsc/
ALCTS/CCS/Committee on Cataloging:
Description and Access
http://www.ala.org/alcts/organization/ccs/
ccda/ccda.html

PCC Task Group on Implementation of
Integrating Resources
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/pcc/standards.html
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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A Presentation by the OLAC
CAPC Chapter 9 Task Force


This online training presentation is a result of the
collaborative work of the members of the Task Force:
 John Attig, Chair, Pennsylvania State University
 Ann Caldwell, Brown University
 Robert Freeborn, Pennsylvania State University
 Rebecca Lubas, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 Steven Miller, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee
We wish to thank Barbara Tillett, Bob Ewald, and David Reser of the
Cataloging Policy and Support Office of the Library of Congress for providing
us with documentation, information about LC policies, and advice on difficult
questions; and the members of OLAC’s Cataloging Policy Committee for
their comments on drafts of this presentation.
Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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Comments and Feedback

Please send comments or questions about this
online training presentation to:
Meredith Horan, Chair, OLAC Cataloging Policy
Committee: [email protected]
Or:
 John Attig, Cataloging Services, Pennsylvania State
University: [email protected]

Copyright © 2001 Online Audiovisual Catalogers, Inc.
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