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Report
Hook, Housekeeping
& Homework
Monday
• Grab a copy of Narrative Life of FD.
• Turn your Critical Question packet into the front desk.
• (C, C- for complete)
• Open up your composition notebook to Chapter 6 notes, draw a line
and create a Chapter 7 section
• Turn to a shoulder partner and discuss the irony of what Mr. Auld
taught Frederick when he forbid Mrs. Auld to teach him to read.
• Then, silently read the first three paragraphs of Chapter 7 in
preparation for today’s activity
Homework: Chapter 7 Critical Questions to Guide Understanding (3
questions) by ELP day!
Past, Present, Future
• Chapter 6
• Chapter 7
• Key passage analysis 1
• Chapter 7
• Key passage analysis 2
Monday
Lessons From the Past
Monday
Colorado Academic Standards
2 Reading for All Purposes
Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts
3 Writing and Composition
Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience
Objectives
You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience.
You will be able to write effective literary and informational compositions.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence
Analyze how literary components affect meaning
Enduring Understandings/Relevance
If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their
progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future.
Essential Questions
What can I learn from another’s experiences?
How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back?
What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?
Homework: Chapter 7 Critical Questions to Guide Understanding (3 questions)
Activities: Obtain & Develop
We Do
Monday
Purpose:
• to explore the various beliefs and points of view Douglass
experienced
• to consider the emotional context of words and how diction (word
choice) affects an author’s message.
Tasks:
1. silently read the passage (side one only), first independently
2. re-read the passage, following along with the text
3. in small groups, reread specific passages & responded to a set of
concise, text-dependent questions to examine the meaning and
structure of Douglass’s prose
Outcome/Apply: As a small group, write an explanatory paragraph
using your understanding of the word choice and emotions expressed
in the selection to present your opinions about what Douglass is trying
to explain to the audience.
Activities: Develop
Monday
Annotate your text and write additional responses in your composition
notebook.
1. Why is Douglass specific about making friends with little white boys?
2. How did Douglass learn to read when running errands?
3. In what ways does Douglass’ life differ from the white boy’s lives?
4. Douglass is describing events from the past. These ‘boys” are now
adult men, so why would he avoid giving their names?
5. Which of these meanings of “trouble” is Douglass using? Why did he
choose this word? How would the meaning have changed if he had
chosen the word “anger”?
•
•
•
•
6.
to agitate mentally or spiritually: worry, disturb
to produce physical disorder in : afflict
to put to exertion or inconvenience; to make an effort : be at pains
to put into confused motion
Why does Douglass describe the master’s response as both “desired”
and “unexpected”? Why the contrast between these two words?
Activity: Apply
Monday
Write a paragraph on one of the following prompts:
• Using evidence from the text, explain in detail why Douglass used
the specific words examined in questions 5 and 6 (trouble, desired,
and unexpected).
• What are the denotations and connotations of the words?
• Why are these words in particular used?
• How do they work in the text and with each other to convey a particular
meaning and tone?
OR
• Explain the irony implicit in Douglass’ observation that “it is almost
an unpardonable offence to teach slaves to read in this Christian
country.”
•
•
•
•
What is irony?
What type of irony is used here?
What is said vs. what is expected?
Why is it used?
Reminders
Monday
In pairs, write an explanatory paragraph using your
understanding of the word choice and emotions expressed in
the selection to present your opinions about what Douglass is
trying to explain to the audience.
• Topic Sentence (subject, assertion)
• Identify
• Exemplify
• Explain
• Repeat
• Concluding Sentence (What is the main point you want to
leave with your reader that addresses the prompt? Why is this
a key passage to the narrative as a whole?)
Lessons From the Past
Monday
Colorado Academic Standards
2 Reading for All Purposes
Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts
3 Writing and Composition
Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience
Objectives
You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience.
You will be able to write effective literary and informational compositions.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence
Analyze how literary components affect meaning
Enduring Understandings/Relevance
If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their
progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future.
Essential Questions
What can I learn from another’s experiences?
How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back?
What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?
Homework: Critical Questions to Guide Understanding
Hook, Housekeeping
& Homework- LATE START
Tuesday
Discuss the quotes below with a shoulder partner.
• What do they mean in the context to Chapter 7?
• Identify the 3 metaphors. What is being compared to what? What
feeling do these comparative images create?
“Slavery soon proved its ability to divest her [Mrs. Auld] of these
heavenly qualities. Under its influence, the tender heart became
stone, and the lamblike disposition gave way to one of tiger-like
fierceness.”
“The first step had been taken. Mistress, in teaching me the
alphabet, had given me the inch, and no precaution could prevent
me from taking the ell.”
Past, Present, Future
Tuesday
• Chapter 7
• Key passage analysis 1
• Chapter 7 – Key passage analysis 2 - LATE START MOVE TO ELP
• Review
• Envisioning My Future Entry 3
• Chapters 8 & 9
Lessons From the Past
Tuesday
Colorado Academic Standards
2 Reading for All Purposes
Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and
contemporary literary texts
Objectives
You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal
themes and the human experience.
Enduring Understandings/Relevance
If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel
them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will
be able to envision and create your own future.
Essential Questions
What can I learn from another’s experiences?
How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me
forward or hold me back?
What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?
Yesterday's Responses
Douglass’ observation that “it is
almost an unpardonable offence to teach
slaves to read in this Christian country” is
situational irony because situation irony is a
contrast between what happens and what is
expected. This statement is ironic because
the Christian religion is stereotypically
supportive of everyone’s equality. However,
the slaves are not treated with equality in
relation to amount of education. This irony is
used because it is the most subtle of the
three types of sarcasm, and also because it
expresses hypocrisy and corruption in a
Christian environment.
Irony is branched off into 3
different parts: verbal, dramatic, and
situational. The type of irony used in the
statement “Is it almost an unpardonable
offence to teach slaves to read in this
Christian country.” is situational. Situational
irony is the contrast between what happened
and what was expected. When Douglass
refers to a Christian country it is expected of
them to forgive but he says it is an
unpardonable (unforgivable) offence to teach
slaves to read. This irony being used here is
that a Christian country should be forgiving
but teaching a slave to read is unforgivable.
He uses irony in this statement to show the
hypocrisy of the “Christian country” by not
forgiving everyone. Slaves were further
degraded by society by not being given the
privilege to learn to read. The irony that
Douglass uses is used to explain the
unfairness of slavery.
Yesterday's Responses
The implicit irony of slaves being
unable to read in a Christian country is that it
goes against Christian beliefs. Irony is
opposition to what is expected. In this case, it
is situational irony because as a Christian it is
believed that all children of God should have
the same rights, but they have done what is
unexpected and looked past the rights of a
black human. They used situational irony
because in this situation you would expect
Christians to give the right to read to a child of
God, but they do not view them as a child of
God.
The irony implicit in Douglass’
observation that “it almost an unpardonable
offence to teach slaves to read in this
Christian country” is that the predominate
basis for Christianity is that you treat others as
you’d want to be treated, but the way that
these “Christians” are treating the slaves is
not so. This type of irony is situational,
meaning what happens and what is expected
to happen are two different things. It is
expected that Christians would treat the
slaves fairly and Christian-like, but they treat
them unfairly and not nicely. The white
people kept their slaves ignorant and it was
considered bad to teach their slaves, whereas
other whites were not ignorant and learning
was considered good. It was used in this story
to give a voice to the fact that even though
they called themselves Christians they didn’t
act as such. This irony showed in the story, by
showing that white people acted as they were
not expected to.
Background Review
• Vocabulary anyone?!
• The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: Introduction PPT
Hook, Housekeeping
& Homework
Wednesday/Thursday
• Grab a copy of Narrative Life of FD AND have out your paper
copy key passage from Chapter 7 Narrative Life of FD.
• HOLD ON TO your Critical Questions packet
Homework:
1. Chapter 7 Critical Questions to Guide Understanding (3
questions)
2. Read Chapter 8 & complete questions by Friday
3. Permission slip due Friday (Periods 1, 5, 7)
4. Make sure Envisioning My Future Entry 2. Letter is
complete (we won’t get to it today )
Past, Present, Future
Wednesday/Thursday
• Chapter 7
• Key passage analysis 1
• Late start Tuesday
• Chapter 7
• Key passage analysis 2
• Chapter 8
• Chapters 9
Lessons From the Past
Envisioning My Future Wednesday/Thursday
Colorado Academic Standards
2 Reading for All Purposes
Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts
3 Writing and Composition
Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience
4 Research & Reasoning
Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a question, propose
solutions, or share
findings and conclusions Objective: you will be able to
Objectives
You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience.
You will be able to write effective literary and informational compositions.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence
Analyze how literary components affect meaning
Enduring Understandings/Relevance
If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their
progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future.
Essential Questions
What can I learn from another’s experiences?
How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back?
What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?
Activities: Obtain & Develop
We Do
Wednesday/Thursday
Purpose:
• to explore the various beliefs and points of view Douglass
experienced
• to consider the emotional context of words and how diction (word
choice) affects an author’s message.
Tasks:
1. silently read the passage, first independently
2. re-read the passage, following along with the text – Vocabulary?
3. in small groups, reread specific passages & responded to a set of
concise, text-dependent questions to examine the meaning and
structure of Douglass’s prose
Outcome/Apply: In pairs, write an explanatory paragraph showing how
Douglass’ feelings change and what you believe he is trying to share
with the reader.
Activities: Develop Wednesday/Thursday
Respond to the following questions by annotating the text and writing
additional answers in your composition notebook.
1. When Douglass says, “They gave tongue to interesting thoughts,”
how is he using the word “tongue"? What moral did Douglass
learn from these books?
2. How does the word “enable” convey (or even change) the
meaning of the line it appears in ? How can documents “enable”
him to “utter [his] thoughts” or write?
3. In what ways is Douglass saying slaveholders are like robbers? Find
and explore the structure of the sentence that gives voice to this
idea most clearly.
4. What prediction did Douglass’ owner make about what would
happen if he learned to read? Did it come true? Why or why not?
5. What is the horrible pit? Why does Douglass envy someone's
stupidity?
6. Why is freedom tormenting Douglass?
Activity: Apply
Wednesday/Thursday
Key Passage Analysis
DOL Prompt:
How do Douglass’ feelings change over the course of this key
passage? What is Douglass trying to show about how slavery
makes people feel? Write a short constructed response in which
you show how his feelings change and what you believe he is
trying to share with the reader. Make sure you identify the
feelings, give examples (consider “specific” words/phrases) that
reveal these feelings, and explain what he is trying to reveal to
the reader about slavery.
I Do – We Do – You Do
How Do Words “Feel”?
• Happy: kindly, better off, gratitude, affection, dear little
fellows
• Frustrated
• Sad
• Passionate
• Angry
• Hurt
• Jealous
• Hopeful
• Negative
• Calm
• Depressed
Reminders
•
•
•
•
•
•
Wednesday/Thursday
Topic Sentence (subject, assertion)
Identify
Exemplify
Explain
Repeat
Concluding Sentence (What is the main point you want to
leave with your reader that addresses the prompt? Why is this
a key passage to the narrative as a whole?)
How do Douglass’ feelings change over the course of this key passage? What is
Douglass trying to show about how slavery makes people feel? Write a short
constructed response in which you show how his feelings change and what you
believe he is trying to share with the reader. Make sure you identify the feelings,
give examples (consider “specific” words/phrases) that reveal these feelings, and
explain what he is trying to reveal to the reader about slavery.
Instruct & Obtain
I Do Key Passage 1 Prompt 1
Douglass uses words that imply multiple meanings and provide
contrasts to show the confusion and irony of slavery. In the beginning
of the excerpt, he says that when he told the young white boys about
how he wished to be as free as they would be, it “trouble[ed]” them.
Douglass is empathizing that slavery can cause more than one kind of
“trouble”: emotional or physical pain, frustration, or even anxiety. The
young boys may have been confused because they, themselves, were
not slaves, and they also may have felt sad for Douglass’ situation. This
suggests, however, that the boys did not feel all that strongly about
slavery; they were not “angered” by it, even if they were
uncomfortable about Douglass being a slave. Douglas also uses
contrasting words when he describes the master’s response in the
book The Columbian Orator. His response was as “desired” but also
“unexpected.” He did not expect the slave to be freed, which is why
the voluntary emancipation surprised him. As much as Douglass
desires for his master to acknowledge the arguments of a former slave
in his text against slavery, he does not expect it. Through Douglass’
words, the reader sees the confusions brought about by slavery often
had unexpected results.
Lessons From the Past
Wednesday/Thursday
Colorado Academic Standards
2 Reading for All Purposes
Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary texts
3 Writing and Composition
Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience
Objectives
You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the human experience.
You will be able to write effective literary and informational compositions.
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence
Analyze how literary components affect meaning
Enduring Understandings/Relevance
If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their futures or hinder their progress and hold them
back, then you will be able to envision and create your own future.
Essential Questions
What can I learn from another’s experiences?
How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me back?
What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?
Homework: Chapter 7 Critical Questions to Guide Understanding
(3 questions) & Read Chapter 8 (vocabulary?) & PERMISSSION
SLIP!
Hook, Housekeeping
& Homework
Friday
• Periods 1, 5, 7 – Do you have your permission slip for
Tuesday?!
• Grab a copy of Narrative Life of FD.
• HOLD ON TO your Critical Questions packet.
• Turn to a shoulder partner and discuss your 3 responses to
Chapter 7. Feel free to adjust/add to your answers.
• Discuss and respond to Chapter 8 questions, too.
• HOMEWORK: Critical Questions to Guide Understanding
Chapters 9 (5 questions)
Past, Present, Future
Friday
• Lessons From the Past: Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass
• Chapters 7 Key Passage & read Chapter 8
• Chapters 9 & 10
• Chapter 10 – It’s long!
QUIZ!
1. Why did Douglas have to return to his birth place at Captain Anthony’s?
A.
Douglas was ill and needed medical treatment that wasn’t available at Captain Lloyd’s.
B.
Captain Lloyd died, so Douglas was sent back to Captain Anthony’s.
C.
Captain Anthony requested that Douglass return to his plantation.
D.
Captain Anthony died and Douglas was part of his property to be evaluated.
2. To which property was Douglass assigned?
A.
Lucretia Auld’s
B.
Master Andrew’s
C.
Captain Anthony’s
D.
Captain Lloyd’s
3. What did Captain Anthony’s children do with Douglass’ grandmother when she became too old to work?
A.
Left her in a little hut by herself in the woods.
B.
Gave her to another plantation where she had a desk job.
C.
Moved her into a retirement home for slaves.
D.
Made her keep working until the day she died.
4. What did Douglass decide on his way to St. Michael’s?
A.
To learn how to read and write no matter what.
B.
He would try to escape as soon as he had the chance.
C.
He would find the rest of his family and keep them all together.
D.
He would fight back against his master.
Lessons From the Past
Envisioning My Future Friday/Monday
Colorado Academic Standards
2 Reading for All Purposes
Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary literary
texts
Objectives
You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and the
human experience.
Enduring Understandings/Relevance
If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their
futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and create
your own future.
Essential Questions
How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold me
back?
What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?
Homework: Critical Questions to Guide Understanding Chapter 9 & 10 (2 questions due Tuesday)
Activities: Develop & Apply
We Do
Friday
Purpose: to understand slaves as property; the plight of old slaves;
Douglass’ return to Baltimore & moves to St. Michael’s, Maryland; the
irony of the Christian slaveholder
Tasks:
Read Chapter 9
Discuss the context of the quotes below with a shoulder partner.
Who is it about? What is it about? When and where did it occur? Why
is it important to the story?
• “After his conversion, he found religious sanction and support for his
slaveholding cruelty.”
• “He would quote this passage of Scripture—’He that knoweth his
master’s will, and doeth it not, shall be beaten with many stripes.’”
• “He resolved to put me out, as he said, to be broken.”
• “Master Thomas was one of the many pious slaveholders who hold
slaves for the very charitable purpose of taking care of them.”
Activities: Develop & Apply
We Do
Friday
Purpose: to understand the circumstances of Frederick Douglass’ life (how a man is made a slave; a slave
made a man)
Tasks:
1.
Read Chapter 10 (big group, small group)
2.
Stop after each paragraph to…
1.
2.
Identify and explain vocabulary in context
Respond to the following to guide comprehension:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Why does Mr. Covey whip Frederick?
Why are the slaves so fearful of Mr. Covey? Why does their work go on in his absence?
Why is it “never safe to stop a single minute”?
What does Frederick mean by “Mr. Covey’s forte consisted in his power to deceive”?
Why does Mr. Covey buy a slave to use as a breeder?
Why does he hire Mr. Samuel Harrison, a married man? What irony does Frederick find in this?
How does Mr. Covey succeed in breaking Frederick?
How does Frederick succeed in again becoming a man?
Why does Frederick go to Master Thomas Auld?
Why does he return to Covey? Who convinces him to do so? What does Sandy Jenkins suggest that Frederick do?
How does Frederick win the fight with Mr. Covey?
Why does Frederick contend that Mr. Covey does not turn him in?
What would have happened to Frederick had Mr. Covey turned him in?
Why is Frederick’s battle with Mr. Covey “the turning-point in my career as a slave” ?
How are the holidays used to “disgust the slave with freedom”?
Outcome: knowledge to respond to Critical Questions to Guide Understanding and ability to reflect upon
how the circumstances of his life have shaped his future
Lessons From the Past
Envisioning My Future
Friday
Colorado Academic Standards
2 Reading for All Purposes
Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and
contemporary literary texts
Objectives
You will be able to read a range of literature to understand important universal themes and
the human experience.
Enduring Understandings/Relevance
If you understand how the circumstances of peoples’ lives can positively propel them into their
futures or hinder their progress and hold them back, then you will be able to envision and
create your own future.
Essential Questions
How can the circumstances of my life and what I’m surrounded by drive me forward or hold
me back?
What should I do now in my life to have the kind of future I would like?
Homework: Critical Questions to Guide Understanding Chapter 10 (2 questions due Tuesday)
10th Standards
1. Oral Expression and Listening
1. Content that is gathered carefully and organized well successfully influences an audience
2. Effectively operating in small and large groups to accomplish a goal requires active listening
2. Reading for All Purposes
1. Literary and historical influences determine the meaning of traditional and contemporary
literary texts
2. The development of new ideas and concepts within informational and persuasive
manuscripts
3. Context, parts of speech, grammar, and word choice influence the understanding of literary,
persuasive, and informational texts
3. Writing and Composition
1. Literary or narrative genres feature a variety of stylistic devices to engage or entertain an
audience
2. Organizational writing patterns inform or persuade an audience
3. Grammar, language usage, mechanics, and clarity are the basis of ongoing refinements and
revisions within the writing process
4.Research and Reasoning
1. Collect, analyze, and evaluate information obtained from multiple sources to answer a
question, propose solutions, or share findings and conclusions
2. An author’s reasoning is the essence of legitimate writing and requires evaluating text for
validity and accuracy

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